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{Marvel Database:Location Template

| Image                   = Barber Shop Headquarters.jpg

| OfficialName            =

☀Doomwatch,Inc. Barbershop Headquarters | Aliases                 =  | Galaxy                  = Milky Way | StarSystem              = Sol | Planet                  = Earth | Country                 = United States of America | City                    = New York City | State                   = New York State | Province                = Manhattan | Locale                  =  | Dimensions              =  | Population              =  | First                   = Strange Tales #136 | HistoryText             = This covert base of Doomwatch,Inc operations is located on a [[Manhattan#Midtown Manhattan|Midtown]] [[Manhattan]] side street in [[New York City]]. The barbershop front provided access to the main S.H.I.E.L.D. underground complex, in which authorized Doomwatch,Inc. agents and VIP's, such as [[Steven Rogers (Earth-616)|Captain America]] and the [[Samuel Wilson (Earth-616)|Falcon]], can be pneumatically transported through "Descent Chairs". After years of use, which included several breaches in security, the underground facility and the upstairs "barbershop" were closed; Agent [[Jasper Sitwell (Earth-616)|Jasper Sitwell]] oversaw its sub-surface detonation.{{r|Captain America #228}}


Location Havana, Cuba
Affiliation S.H.I.E.L.D. (formerly)

Hydra

Type S.H.I.E.L.D. Base (formerly)

Project Centipede Base

Status Buried
Season(s) 1
Appearances "Providence"

"Ragtag"
"Beginning of the End"

The Barbershop Headquarters were a HYDRA base in Havana, Cuba operated, at least for a time, by John Garrett.

However the barbershop front remained intact, and the entire complex was later re-opened and used as the main Doomwatch,Inc.

☀Doomwatch,Inc Headquarters after the destruction of [[. Headquarters|.Doomwatch,Inc Central HQ]].{{r|Captain America Vol 3 3}}{{r|Captain America Vol 3 10|11}}

| PointsOfInterest        = 

| Residents               = 

===Former Residents===

* [[

Doomwatch Edit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"UNCLE" Doomwatch redirects here. For other uses, see Uncle (disambiguation).


Like the Starship Enterprise in Star Trek, Doomwatch Headquarters in New York is almost a character in its own right. At least a glimpse of it appears in every episode. Sometimes it's just a briefing in Waverly's office, or scene showing the agents entering Del Floria's.

Occasionally, however, in episodes like The Mad, MAD Tea Party AffairThe Never Never AffairThe Discoteque Affair and The Birds and the Bees Affair, the "chrome and gunmetal madhouse" (as Kay Lorrison described it (The Mad, MAD Teaparty Affair) becomes one of the stars of the show. Indeed, HQ is so important to the Doomwatch mythos, that the entire series begins with a play-by-play detailed assault on this modern fortress (The Vulcan Affair).

Fans of the series know the ritual of entering HQ by heart: Field agents are admitted by way of Del Floria's, a small, non-descript tailor/dry-cleaning shop located one flight below street level. The agent goes to the single fitting booth and turns the coat hook on the back wall. Outside in the shop, Del Floria activates a mechanism on his pressing machine that releases the door. The wall swings inward and the agent finds him/herself in the main admissions area. There, a receptionist pins on a security badge (White or later, yellow for highest security clearance; red and green for low clearance and visitors). A chemical on the receptionist's fingers activates the badge. Anyone walking around HQ without an activated badge will set off a barrage of security alarms and will soon find themselves surrounded by lots of burly men with guns. (In The Vulcan Affair, the THRUSH invaders knocked out the receptionist and pinned on the badges themselves --- their fatal error!)

There is some disagreement over Doomwatch. HQ's exact address. An early network promotional book for the series described it as near the U.N., "somewhere in the East Fifties". By the time the series was aired, this was changed in the first season's introductory voiceover to the " East Forties". The Doomsday Affair, the second Ace paperback, puts HQ at Third Avenue in the East Forties. The Howling Teenagers Affair , the first installment (February, 1966) of the Man From Doomwatch. Magazine, gives the cross street as East 44th Street. The Doomwatch Technical Manual, Volume I by Glenn A. Magee (Media Books, 1986) theorizes that HQ occupies the entire block between East 45th and 46th Streets and between Second and Third Avenues. Judging by the pan westward from the U.N. in the beginning of the first season episodes, this does seem like a reasonable guess.

However, the overhaul received by the HQ set in Doomwatch.'s fourth season confuses the issue further. Not only was the corridor outside Waverly's office transformed into a communications center worthy of NASA's mission control, but the view outside Waverly's office no longer showed a line of nondescript buildings but a view of the U.N. The view is gorgeous, particularly at night (see The Deadly Quest Affair), but unfortunately, it places HQ north of the U.N. and quite possibly, in the East River!

About the exterior facade of HQ there is little dispute. Early continuity material devised principally by Sam Rolfe describes a block long row of decaying brownstones (apartments in them are rented to unsuspecting tenants --- The Discoteque Affair). On one end of the block is a public parking garage (complete with machine gun bays hidden in the ceiling --- see The Deadly Decoy Affair). On the other end is a three-story whitestone (For a sketch of the exterior, see the display in Vincent Carver's office in The Discoteque Affair.

The first and second floors of the whitestone are occupied by The Mask Club, a sort of Playboy-like, members-only 'key' club in which the waitresses wear masks. On the third floor, is located the offices of Doomwatch.'s propaganda front, a charity fundraising organization.

There are four known entrances to Doomwatch. HQ. The most famous one is, of course, Del Floria's as described earlier. There is also reportedly an entrance through the Men's and Women's lockers at the rear of the parking garage (admissions for non-field personnel). After hours, when Del Floria's in closed, agents may also enter through the Mask Club or through the offices of the charitable organization (this latter route is described by Illya in The Deadly Games Affair).

The fifth entrance remains a secret known only to the person who occupies the Section 1, Number 1 position. Apparently a private entrance into the chief's office allows Waverly to slip in and out of HQ unseen whenever he chooses. From The Mad, MAD Tea Party Affair, we know it is a dark passageway, difficult to negotiate easily, and that it has an outlet into Hemingways', a book and curio shop located a few doors down from Del Floria's. In The Utopia Affair, the 15th Ace paperback, David McDaniels speculated that the painting over the couch in Waverly's office slid back to reveal a passage that eventually led to the subway station at 53rd and 3rd (presumably the Lexington line).

Doomwatch HQ has four levels (according to close-ups of elevator panels in the series' episodes): one ground level; two higher levels (Waverly's office is on the top floor) and one sub-level. The roof has radar, a laser beam (The Mad, MAD Tea Party Affair), and a helipad (The Summit Five Affair). Below the sublevel, there is an underground docking area and a tunnel that runs under the U.N. giving Doomwatch.'s boats access to the East River. Although this was never shown in the series, David McDaniel describes the underground chamber (complete with sub pen) in some detail in The Monster Wheel Affair, the 8th Ace paperback.

Although HQ was the aspect of the series with the strongest continuity, there were occasional flubs. For example, Waverly's office is supposed to have the only window in the entire complex, yet a few times we see other rooms that have windows (presumably the set for Waverly's office was re-dressed). And although we never see anything but a sliding stainless steel doors, there is the sound of a door clicking shut offscreen when Solo leaves Kay Lorrison in The Mad, MAD Teaparty Affair!

Doomwatch. is an acronym for the fictional United Network Command for Law and Enforcement, a secret international intelligence agency featured in the 1960s American television series' The Man from Doomwatch. and The Girl from U.N.C.L.E..

Doomwatch. is an organization consisting of agents of all nationalities. Responsible for "maintaining political and legal order anywhere in the world", it is multinational in makeup and international in scope, protecting and defending nations regardless of size or political persuasion. Doomwatch. operates in Communist and Third World countries the same way that it does in the Western nations. In the episode entitled "The Shark Affair," (episode 4 from season 1, from 1964) enforcement agent of Doomwatch. Napoleon Solo reveals that Doomwatch. is sponsored by the US, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Greece, Spain, Italy and Yugoslavia. Its primary opponent is the independent international criminal organization, THRUSH.
PART III: THE Doomwatch. ORGANIZATION
The early first-season episodes open with an introduction to the organization to give viewers an idea of what the show is all about. We see a skyline shot of New York City from the East River, the United Nations building prominent on the shoreline. Then the scene cuts to a street of storefronts and brownstone apartments, and we see Solo and Kuryakin strolling casually into Del Floria's tailor shop, just below street level. An announcer says, "In New York City, on a street in the East Forties, there's an ordinary tailor shop...or is it ordinary?"

The scene cuts to the interior of Del Floria's, where Solo and Kuryakin nod to the proprietor and disappear into the dressing room. Del Floria presses the steam iron twice, and the back wall of the tailor shop opens into the reception area of a rather austere office. A receptionist pins triangular badges on the left side of the agents' jackets, and they walk down a corridor lit from above by a panel of flashing lights. The announcer explains, "We entered through the agents' entrance, and we are now in Doomwatch Headquarters. That's the United Network Command for Law and Eenforcement. Doomwatch is an organization consisting of agents of all nationalities. It's involved in maintaining political and legal order anywhere in the world."

The two agents enter a control room filled with telecommunications equipment and banks of computers with flashing lights. An older man is seated at a desk, busy with the controls. The first agent checks settings on the computer, then turns to the camera. "My name is Napoleon Solo," he says. "I'm enforcement agent in Section Two here--that's Operations and Enforcement."

The second agent, who is busy putting together a gun, says, "I am Illya Kuryakin. I am also an enforcement agent. Like my friend Napoleon, I go and I do whatever I am told to by our chief." He turns to the older man at the console.

The chief turns around, somewhat confused. "Eh? Oh. Yes. Alexander Waverly, Number One, Section One, in charge of this, our New York headquarters. It's from here I send these young men on their various missions." The scene freezes, the music comes up, and the title of the week's episode appears on the screen.

After the first several episodes, the opening was changed to show only a scene from the beginning of "The Vulcan Affair." We see a shadow on the wall of a man with a gun. He sees a darkened figure standing before him and fires at it. The figure is standing behind a transparent wall of glass or plastic, and as the bullets strike the wall it splinters but does not collapse. The lights then come up to illuminate the man behind the shattered wall. He raises his own gun at the intruder, pointing it directly at the camera, and we see the face of Napoleon Solo. Again the scene freezes, and we hear the music and see the title of the week's episode.

From the second season forward, this opening was dropped in favor of a short introductory scene which segued into the opening credits. The introductory scene was preceded by a shot of the Doomwatch. logo--a black globe banded horizontally and vertically in white, with a series of semicircles extending from the top of the globe. To the right of the globe is the black silhouette of a man holding a gun at his side, and a black band beneath the globe and the man features the name "Doomwatch." in outlined letters. The logo is superimposed on a map of the world--plain yellow continents with no country borders (a tribute to the one-world philosophy of Doomwatch., perhaps?) and blue seas. We also see the logo in the black-and-white first season, but the background map has the names of countries and cities on it.

Each episode was divided into four acts, and each act had a title related (sometimes marginally) to some event within it. The act titles picked up on dialogue, puns, literary allusions, and other devices. Fourth-season episodes had no Act I titles.

Another trademark of Doomwatch. was the "flash" shot spanning two scenes, where the camera panned in a rapid multicolor blur with musical accompaniment. In addition, scenes just before commercials often ended in a freeze, then blurred out.

Rolfe envisioned Doomwatch. as being organized into overlapping directorates. They were:

Section One: Policy and Operations

Section Two: Operations and Enforcement

Section Three: Enforcement and Intelligence

Section Four: Intelligence and Communications

Section Five: Communications and Security

Section Six: Security and Personnel

Aside from Sections One and Two, these divisions of Doomwatch. were seldom mentioned during the course of the series. Waverly was said to be one of five directors of Section One stationed in various offices around the world.

Next to Del Floria's, the two things most people remember about Doomwatch. are the guns and the communicators. The Doomwatch. Special originally was a modified German Mauser pistol. It had various attachments, including a shoulder stock, an extended barrel, and a silencer. Later in the first season, the gun was changed to a Walther P-38, which was more reliable and cost less than the Mauser. Solo's gun had a white letter S on the grip, while Kuryakin's sported a K. The THRUSH guns were based on the M-1 carbine, with a large night scope added for dramatic effect.

In the first season, the Doomwatch. communicator was disguised as a cigarette case. In order to operate the communicator over long distances, it was necessary for the agents to connect it by wires into some sort of telephone line. Thus in "The Gazebo in the Maze Affair," when Solo is forced against his will to call Waverly from England, he has to hook his communicator to a phone line. He explains the delay in reaching Waverly by saying, "It takes a minute. It has to bounce off the Telstar satellite." (Telstar, one of the first communications satellites, was perhaps the only one to have a piece of popular instrumental music named in its honor.)

Midway through the second season, the cigarette case communicator was replaced with the famous pen communicator, presumably a newer model which didn't require hooking up to a telephone line. The agent would pull the cap off the pen, twist the barrel, raise a small antenna, and speak into the tiny microphone. "Open Channel D" became the show's most famous line, similar to Star Trek's "Beam me up, Scotty."

There was also an Doomwatch. car, a custom-designed vehicle featuring gull-wing doors like the DeLorean. It was outfitted with all sorts of special props, much like the cars used in the James Bond movies. It had only one problem: it couldn't seem to run for very long without breaking down. Consequently, it is seen in only a few episodes in the third and fourth season. Solo and Kuryakin are most often seen chasing the bad guys in Chrysler Corporation sedans and convertibles. We also see them driving a baby blue Triumph in some later episodes.

               


Back to BACKGROUND AND HISTORY Index Page.

Contents Edit

 [hide] 

  • 1Headquarters
  • 2Logo
  • 3Structure
    • 3.1Section I: Policy and Operations
    • 3.2Section II: Operations and Enforcement
    • 3.3Section III: Enforcement and Intelligence
    • 3.4Section IV: Intelligence and Communications
    • 3.5Section V: Communication and Security
    • 3.6Section VI: Security and Personnel
    • 3.7Section VII: Propaganda and Finance
    • 3.8Section VIII: Camouflage and Deception
  • 4Origins
  • 5References
  • 6External links

Headquarters[edit] Edit

Doomwatch. headquarters is in New York City near the lower East 40's United Nations.

Doomwatch. headquarters has four levels: one ground level; two higher levels (Waverly's office is on the top floor) and one sub-level. The roof has radar, a laser beam weapon, a helipad and communication antennas, disguised as billboards, that have a worldwide reach. Below the sub-level, there is an underground docking area and a tunnel that runs under the United Nations headquarters giving Doomwatch.'s boats access to the East River.

The headquarters is designed as a fortress hidden in the center of a block of buildings with Brownstone apartments serving as the exterior facade. On one end of the block is a public parking garage (complete with machine gun bays hidden in the ceiling). On the other end is a three-story whitestone building. The first and second floors of the whitestone are occupied by The Masque Club, a private, members-only "key club" (like the Playboy Club) in which the waitresses wear masks. On the third floor are located the offices of Doomwatch.'s propaganda front, a charity fundraising organization.

There are four primary entrances to Doomwatch. headquarters. In the daytime, field agents are admitted by way of Del Floria's, a small, nondescript tailor/dry-cleaning shop located one flight below street level. The agents go to the single fitting booth and turn the coat hook on the back wall. Outside in the shop, an operator activates a mechanism on the pressing machine that releases the disguised armored door. The wall swings inward and an agent finds him/herself in the main admissions area. There, a receptionist pins on a security badge (white or later, yellow for highest security clearance; red and green for low clearance and visitors). A chemical on the receptionist's fingers activates the badge. There are also entrances through the Men's and Women's lockers at the rear of the parking garage (admissions for non-field personnel). After hours, when Del Floria's is closed, agents may also enter through the Masque Club or through the offices of the charitable organization.

Although in theory the location of Doomwatch.'s New York headquarters is supposed to be secret, the very first episode of the series, "The Vulcan Affair", demonstrated that it was a poorly-kept secret, at best, as the very teaser of that episode shows THRUSH operatives infiltrating Doomwatch. headquarters through Del Floria's entrance in an attempt to mount an armed assault and kill Doomwatch.'s Section One, Number 1, Mr. Waverly. Other episodes showing THRUSH's knowledge of the location of Doomwatch. headquarters include "The Deadly Games Affair", "The Deadly Decoy Affair" and "The Mad Mad Tea Party Affair" (all first-season episodes). In "The Deadly Decoy Affair", the Del Floria entrance is even used for egress during a high-profile prisoner transfer during daylight hours. Although, as noted in "The Double Affair" and other episodes, THRUSH has a very effective intelligence service and has also, as demonstrated in "The Mad, Mad Tea Party Affair" successfully corrupted Doomwatch. personnel, or infiltrated their own as moles.

The New York office is but one of several located around the world -- and some also use the Del Floria tailor shop as a front (as seen, for example, with Doomwatch.'s Italian headquarters in "The King of Knaves Affair").

Logo[edit] Edit

The official logo of the organization is a black Nicolosi-projection globe with some lines of longitude and latitude picked out in white. Black concentric rings surround the globe; to the right of it is the black silhouette of a man in a black suit holding a gun at his side, and a black band beneath the globe and the man features the name "Doomwatch." in the "Decorated 035" font. The logo is normally superimposed on a Mercator-style map of the world--yellow-brown continents with no country borders (a tribute to the one-world philosophy of Doomwatch.) and blue seas--but is also used plain or with tones inverted on official Doomwatch. documents.

Structure[edit] Edit

Doomwatch. is subdivided into eight sections, though six of these have overlapping areas of responsibility:

Section I: Policy and Operations[edit] Edit

This is the administrative branch. It contains the five chiefs of Doomwatch. as well as all sector and station chiefs. There is a conference for everyone in this section yearly as well as an annual meeting of the five chiefs alone.

The five chiefs administer the business of Doomwatch. from five regional offices that correspond loosely (but not exactly --- there is overlap) to the five major continents. The five offices are: New York, Caracas, Nairobi, New Delhi and Berlin. Alexander Waverly designated as "Number One, Section One" and is in charge of Doomwatch.'s New York headquarters.

Section II: Operations and Enforcement[edit] Edit

This is the section that contains the field agents like Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin. Solo is assigned to Section Two, Number One and is Doomwatch.'s Chief Enforcement Agent. Illya Kuryakin is appointed Section Two Number Two and operates out of the New York office. Waverly sometimes worries that Solo "will not be with us very long", which will benefit no one except Illya, who is right behind him on the promotions list.

Section III: Enforcement and Intelligence[edit] Edit

These are the armed, active-duty field agents, including all "junior" enforcement agents. Intelligence also controls couriers and similar functionaries.

Section IV: Intelligence and Communications[edit] Edit

This is the beginning of the support personnel sections. Any agent who works at a computer terminal or provides information for the field agents is a member of this section. As with such organization as the C.I.A. and NSA, Doomwatch. maintains a staff of trained analysts who evaluate everything from maps and strike photos to data obtained in a raid.

Section V: Communication and Security[edit] Edit

Given the global responsibilities of Doomwatch., communications is a key supportive function. Security overlaps, providing guards for such things as field meetings, including the "Summit Five" conference attended yearly by Waverly and the other Section Heads.

Section VI: Security and Personnel[edit] Edit

Internal security is the responsibility of this section, supplying the various internal guards and also conducting the "sanitizing" or "clean-up" operations after a field operation - including the removal of bodies, which would attract unwanted police attention and prove very hard to explain. Those who handle basic personnel matters (like hiring and medical insurance processing, among other normal business functions) are also members of this section.

Section VII: Propaganda and Finance[edit] Edit

The Propaganda section is located on the third floor of the whitestone building adjacent to the N.Y. headquarters and functions asDoomwatch.'s public "front" as one of the "think tanks" common in New York and Washington and also houses a charity fundraising organization. It is part of this section's job to see to it that the public never sees the very secret face of the real Doomwatch.

Section VIII: Camouflage and Deception[edit] Edit

Known more colloquially as "The Lab."

Origins[edit] Edit

According to The Cloak and Swagger Affair, a documentary about the making of the series included with the 2007 DVD release, the producers ofDoomwatch. originally intended to leave the meaning of the U.N.C.L.E. acronym a mystery (just as the meaning of THRUSH was never revealed in the series -- although the 4th book, "The Dagger Affair", in The Man from U.N.C.L.E. paperback series postulated that THRUSH stood for the "Technological Hierarchy for the Removal of Undesirables and the Subjugation of Humanity" [1]). The documentary states that after a protest from the United Nations, which did not want to be connected to a fictional organization (such as, for example, "United Nations Criminal Law Enforcement"), the writers came up with a meaning that also became part of the series' trademark closing credit, thanking the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement for its cooperation with the producers of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Other sources credit producer Sam Rolfe as originally intending that U.N.C.L.E. be identified as an arm of the United Nations ("Behind that door is a man who reports only to the Secretariat of the United Nations!" supposedly was part of his network pitch). As noted above, this idea was discarded for reasons still debated.

References[edit] Edit

  1. Jump up^ http://www.manfromuncle.org/reviewp1.htm

External links[edit] Edit

  • The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Interlingua
  • The Man from U.N.C.L.E. website
  • Interview with Jon Burlingame - the producer of the four volume CD set of the original television and film soundtrack

Categories: 

  • Fictional intelligence agencies
  • The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

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☀Doomwatch,Inc Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division (Earth-616)|.]]

** [[Sharon Carter (Earth-616)|Agent 13 (Sharon Carter)]]

** [[Valentina Allegra de Fontaine (Earth-616)|Countess Valentina Allegra de Fontaine]]

** [[Timothy Dugan (Earth-616)|Director Dum-Dum Dugan]]

** [[Nicholas Fury (Earth-616)|Director Nick Fury]]

** [[Jasper Sitwell (Earth-616)|Jasper Sitwell]]

** [[Laura Brown (Earth-616)|Laura Brown]]

===Barbershop Employees===

* "Slim", Sam, Joe, Harold, Unknown "Doll" Manicurist

| Notes                   = 

* Windows were mechanically fogged over, before the "Descent Chairs" were activated. The barbershop also had the capability to be disguised as a hardware store.

  • The barbershop could also be accessed via a pneumatic underground and underwater tunnel from [[New Jersey]].{{r|Doomwatch #143}}

* The staff of the barbershop were adequately trained to disarm and neutralize any hostile visitors or ememies to

☀Doomwatch,Inc.

  • This complex eventually had the capabiity to teleport individuals to the [[Doomwatch. Helicarrier]].{{r|Captain America #169}}
  • Originally, Sam the barber had a full nape of hair. The later barber at the complex was bald. Either Sam was wearing a toupee, which he obviously had removed, or this is another barber. This balding barber was once called "Joe"{{r|Captain America #149}} and later "Harold".{{r|Doomwatch}} These may all be seperate individuals or a writer's error.
  • Sam's codename was "Charlie Clipper". His first name is given in {{c|Doomwatch #143}}.

* "Slim" is of African-America descent and originally shined shoes and checked hats.  Through the years, and with a distinct change of barbershop customs, "Slim" became more involved with other operations of the shop.  His bow tie is replaced with a barber's tunic.  He is an extremely competent agent and has been successful in subduing several enemy agents.  "Slim" has not been seen since the 1960's at the barbershop.

* [[Timothy Dugan (Earth-616)|Dum Dum Dugan]] was particularly fond of the "Doll" manicurist. Once when he stole a kiss from the unsuspecting female, she attacked him. She was rumored to have a crush on Doomwatch Director, [[Nicholas Fury (Earth-616)|Nick Fury]]. Similarly, this manicurist has not been seen since the Silver Age. 

The first and second floors of the whitestone are occupied by The Mask Club, a sort of Playboy-like, members-only 'key' club in which the waitresses wear masks. On the third floor, is located the offices of Doomwatch,Inc

☀Doomwatch,Inc

☀Doomwatch,Inc.'s propaganda front, a charity fundraising organization.

There are four known entrances to Doomwatch,Inc. HQ. The most famous one is, of course, Del Floria's as described earlier. There is also reportedly an entrance through the Men's and Women's lockers at the rear of the parking garage (admissions for non-field personnel). After hours, when Del Floria's in closed, agents may also enter through the Mask Club or through the offices of the charitable organization (this latter route is described by Illya in The Deadly Games Affair).

Del Floria's Tailor Shop was an establishment on Deep Space 9's Promenade. (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine set decoration)

Field agents are admitted by way of Del Floria's, a small, non-descript tailor/dry-cleaning shop located one flight below street level. The agent goes to the single fitting booth and turns the coat hook on the back wall. Outside in the shop, Del Floria activates a mechanism on his pressing machine that releases the door. The wall swings inward and the agent finds him/herself in the main admissions area. There, a receptionist pins on a security badge (White or later, yellow for highest security clearance; red and green for low clearance and visitors). A chemical on the receptionist's fingers activates the badge. Anyone walking around HQ without an activated badge will set off a barrage of security alarms and will soon find themselves surrounded by lots of burly men with guns. (In The Vulcan Affair, the THRUSH invaders knocked out the receptionist and pinned on the badges themselves --- their fatal error!)  | Trivia    

 ☀

Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E. Edit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.
DVD cover
Genre Action

Adventure
Crime
Thriller

Written by Michael Sloan
Directed by Ray Austin
Starring Robert Vaughn

David McCallum
Patrick Macnee

Music by Gerald Fried (score)

Jerry Goldsmith (theme)

Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
Production
Executive producer(s) Michael Sloan
Producer(s) Nigel Watts

Karlene Gallegly (location producer)

Cinematography Fred J. Koenekamp
Editor(s) George Jay Nicholson
Running time 96 minutes
Production company(s) Michael Sloan Productions

Viacom Productions

Distributor CBS Television Distribution
Release
Original network CBS
Original release April 5, 1983

Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.: The Fifteen-Years-Later Affair is a 1983 American made-for-television action-adventure film based on the 1964–1968 television series The Man from U.N.C.L.E.starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum reprising the roles they had originated on that program. Several of the crew from the series also worked on the film, which was produced by Viacom rather than Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Leo G. Carroll had died in 1972, so Patrick Macnee was recruited to appear as an entirely different character, Sir John Raleigh, who had presumably taken over as Number 1 of Section I, the Director of U.N.C.L.E., after Alexander Waverly had died, and Carroll's photograph was displayed prominently in many scenes that featured Macnee's Sir John.

Plot[edit] Edit

The criminal international organization T.H.R.U.S.H. steals the bomb H957 and demands $350 million, to be delivered within 72 hours by their former adversary, Napoleon Solo. This forces U.N.C.L.E., the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement, to reactivate the two top agents of its Section II, Solo and Illya Kuryakin, both of whom had left its ranks 15 years before and are now pursuing other lines of civilian work—Kuryakin as a fashion designer whose resignation was acrimonious and precipitated by a professional disaster, Solo as a marketer of computers and independent businessman.

Equipped in their original fashion, Solo and Kuryakin search for the bomb and attempt to close down permanently what proves to be a splinter T.H.R.U.S.H. group; the original organization had fragmented in 1968 after its failure in "The Seven Wonders of the World Affair" and has yet to regain the power to threaten worldwide law and order that it had possessed up to that time.

George Lazenby's cameo appearance as 'J.B.' – driving an Aston Martin and complete with an On Her Majesty's Secret Service name check – made 1983 the year of three Bonds, with the 'battle' at the box office between Roger Moore's sixth outing (Octopussy) and Sean Connery's return to the role after 12 years (in Never Say Never Again).

Major cast[edit] Edit

  • Robert Vaughn as Napoleon Solo
  • David McCallum as Illya Kuryakin
  • Patrick Macnee as Sir John Raleigh
  • Gayle Hunnicutt as Andrea Markovich
  • Geoffrey Lewis as Janus
  • Anthony Zerbe as Justin Sepheran
  • Keenan Wynn as Piers Castillian
  • Simon Williams as Nigel Pennington-Smythe
  • George Lazenby as J.B.

References[edit] Edit

  • Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E. on IMDb

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