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Usually I can tell if I’m going to enjoy a comic book series by the end of the first issue. Black Science is an exception to that. I actually felt the first issue was pretty mediocre (which was a disappointment to me because I’m a big fan of writer Rick Remender). However, with last week’s NYCC sale on the majority of Image Comics’ catalog, I gave the series a second chance. I’m glad I did.

Black Science follows Grant McKay and his team of Dimensionauts, which accidentally includes Grant’s kids. The first issue actually joins the action in media res as Grant and one of his colleagues, Jen, rush through a prehistoric forest, chased by fish monsters riding giant eels.


They come to a cliff face and realize they have to turn and face the monsters. And this is where artist Mateo Scalera really first shows us the scope of the story.


In the midst of the action, we get Grant’s narration about making mistakes, and about how he should have learned from them. He also worries for his kids’ safety and “the Pillar”- which we learn shortly is the crux of the series- getting coolant. The fish people brutally murder Jen, and Grant races against time to make her death matter and save his family and team. It’s definitely problematic that the first female character we meet in the series is immediately fridged, but Remender is able to keep it from becoming cliche.

Grant comes across other natives, frog-men who carry electric eel-like bioelectric charges. After a couple brief skirmishes, Grant finds himself in the throne room of the frogmen, where a fish-woman is being forced to dance. Grant inserts himself into the situation, and rescues to fish-woman, while snagging a pitcher of fresh water to use as coolant for the Pillar.


By the way, the weapon McKay is holding there? The head of one of the frogmen, still carrying its bioelectric charge. Grant escapes the castle and finds himself directly in front of a group of the fishmen. Including, apparently, the slave-woman’s mate.


In gratitude, the fishmen hold off the frogmen so Grant can escape.


He makes it back to his team just in time to add the water to the Pillar, inspect his damaged invention (which he concludes was sabotaged) and inform the team of Jen’s death before they jump home. Or so they think.


Nope... they’re not in Kansas any more.

And that just covers the first issue.

On first read, it was a rousing action adventure tale, but it didn’t really grab me. Scalera drew a great alien world, and the character/monster designs were fantastic, but the writing didn’t grab me like Remender’s work normally did.

Then we hit the second issue. The first issue was a action movie. The second slows down a TEENY bit and starts building the characters, the backstory and the universe. We learn that the Pillar is a trans-universal portal which McKay and his team developed to travel through the multiverse, which Remender calls the Onion.

Seriously, I regret dismissing it the first time I read it. If I didn’t give it a second chance, I would have really missed out on an engaging science fantasy adventure. McKay is an interesting protagonist who gets more interesting as the first volume goes on, and there are several mysteries set up and paid off.

And I say science fantasy because the science is never explained. The Pillar is called black science, but it’s never given an explanation in volume 1 how it works or why. I wouldn’t let that stop you though. It’s a blast to read, and even though it takes more time in later issues to build its characters, it never slows down. The first six issues are one continuous action sequence. Even the single issue the team gets to rest turns into a car chase on a very alien Earth.

Even though the series explores alternate Earths, don’t expect something like the cult classic TV series Sliders or Marvel’s Exiles comic series. The Earths the Dimensionauts find themselves travelling through on their way through the Onion are alien worlds, with the only recognizable element being human beings (if they’re lucky).

This series comes highly recommended. After I finished reading issue #6, I immediately bought the next 7 issues because I had to know what happened next.

Next time you want to give something new a try, pick up Black Science. It’ll be worth the time and money.


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Black Science (comics)Edit

Black Science is a creator-owned science fiction American comic book series by Rick Remender and Italian artist Matteo Scalera. Image Comics released the first issue in November 2013. The story follows Grant McKay, an ex-member of the Anarchist Order of Scientists, and his team and family as they are thrown through dimensions as they try to repair his dimensional device, "the Pillar", created by forbidden, unethical means - the eponymous "Black Science". Via the Pillar, McKay and his fellow "Dimensionauts" were able to leap between worlds to find technological and medical advances for their own, but a member of Grant's team sabotages the pillar, causing it to jump to random locations at random times in increasingly lethal and hostile dimensions, forcing the team to try and return to their own dimension before they are killed by numerous hazards, ranging from parasitic fungi, nihilistic dimensional conquerors, and alternate versions of themselves.[1]

Black ScienceEdit

Black Science Vol. cover. Art by Matteo Scalera. Publication information Publisher Image Comics Schedule monthly Format Ongoing series Genre Science fiction Creative team Created by Rick Remender Written by Rick Remender Artist(s) Matteo Scalera Penciller(s) Matteo Scalera Inker(s) Matteo Scalera Colorist(s) Dean White The first several issues of Black Science sold out of first printings at the distributor level, and Image announced that certain issues would be reprinted.[2]


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==Comic Book Series== Comic Book Series 1,487 PAGES ADD PUBLISHERS GENRES COMMUNITY EXPLORE in: Science Fiction Black Science EDIT SHARE ==Black Science 1== Cover to Black Science #1

Black Science is published by Image Comics. Current price per issue is $3.99.

Contents[hide] Publication Dates Last Issue Current Issue Next Issue Status Characters Main Characters Allies Enemies Minor Characters Other Characters/Places/Things Recent Storylines Black Science #37 Black Science #36 Collections Trade Paperbacks Hardcovers History Leftover Useful Information Creative Team Publishing History Future Publication Dates News & Features Links Publication DatesEdit Last IssueEdit Black Science #37: 11 Jul 2018 Current IssueEdit Black Science #38: 05 Sep 2018 Next IssueEdit Black Science #39: 19 Dec 2018 StatusEdit Irregular series.

CharactersEdit Main CharactersEdit Grant McKay AlliesEdit EnemiesEdit Minor CharactersEdit Other Characters/Places/ThingsEdit The Anarchistic Order of Scientists Recent StorylinesEdit Black Science #37 Edit This is the current issue, and therefore no story information will be posted about this issue. Please check your local comic shop for copies of this issue.

Black Science #36

Edit CollectionsEdit Trade Paperbacks

Edit Black Science, vol. 1: How to Fall Forever - Collects #1-6. "Anarchist scientist Grant McKay has done the impossible! Using the Pillar, he has punched a hole through the barriers between dimensions, allowing travel to all possible universes. But now Grant and his team are trapped in the folds of infinity, the Pillar sending them careening through a million universes of unimaginable adventure, sanity-flaying danger and no way home..." - WorldCat - ISBN 1607069679


Black Science, vol. 2: Welcome, Nowhere Edit

- Collects #7-11. "The Anarchist League of Scientists has lost their leader, the most recent victim of the Pillar’s violently random jumps through the Eververse... but are they really random? As the survivors fight their way through a world where magic and science are one and the same, the secrets of their predicament slowly come to light... and illuminate a terrible truth." - WorldCat - ISBN 1632150182 Black Science, vol. 3: Vanishing Point - Collects #12-16. "The Anarchist League of Scientists dive deeper into the Onion than ever before. Now veterans of inter-dimensional travel, the team begins to realize how damaging their actions are on the fabric of reality. No longer content with merely fixing the Pillar and finding a way back home, they vow to uphold a new ideal: leave every dimension they visit better off than how they found it." - WorldCat - ISBN 9781632153951


Black Science, vol. 4: Godworld Edit

- Collects #17-21. "Following the catastrophic final jump of the Pillar, the last Dimensionaut is stranded in the furthest reaches of space, adrift on the wreckage of his former self. Before he can reclaim his mantle as protector of the Eververse, he must first overcome the demons that lurk within his own soul." - WorldCat - ISBN 9781632156860 Black Science, vol. 5: True Atonement - Collects #22-25. "Grant McKay attempts to rescue his team from the evil of the Withering Woods, but his presence threatens to unravel a peace treaty between the world's gods and cost his daughter a hard earned happiness. The Dimensionauts' long jaunt through alternative realities is finally leading them back home, but what will it take to get there? More importantly, what has happened while they were gone?" - WorldCat - ISBN 9781534300330

== Black Science, vol. 6: Forbidden Realms and Hidden Truths ==

- Collects #26-30. "After years adrift in the chaotic Eververse, the McKay family finally reunites in their home dimension. But it’s far from the happy end they expected. To save all there is and ever will be, the Dimensionauts need to cut deeper into the Onion than ever before!" - WorldCat - ISBN 9781534301825


Black Science, vol. 7: Extinction Is the Rule Edit

- Collects #31-34. "The Eververse is collapsing under its own weight. The Dimensionauts, a ragtag collection of heroes, scientists, and anarchists from countless alternate realities, must band together and head towards the center of the Onion, the infinite-layered construct of all there is, was, and ever could be. Grant McKay created the Pillar to save the world with science, and now he must use it to save all worlds, all of creation, or doom reality itself to oblivion." - WorldCat - ISBN 9781534304932


Black Science, vol. 8: Later Than You Think Edit

- Collects #35-38. "The Anarchist League of Scientists is scattered to the cosmic winds. Abuse of the Pillar’s power has gnawed at the very foundation of reality, as all that ever is, was, and will be is falling in on itself. Beaten and dismayed, it falls to Grant McKay and what allies he has left to start a Hail Mary mission to the center of the Onion, and the chance of salvation that rests there." - WorldCat - ISBN 9781534306943 HardcoversEdit


Black Science Premiere, vol. 1: The Beginners' Guide to Entropy Edit

- Collects #1-16. - WorldCat - ISBN 9781632154934 Black Science Premiere, vol. 2: Transcendentalism - Collects #17-30. - WorldCat - ISBN 9781534303447 HistoryEdit Leftover Useful InformationEdit Creative TeamEdit Writer/Creator: Rick Remender. Artist/Creator/Covers: Matteo Scalera.

Publishing HistoryEdit First published in 2013.

Future Publication DatesEdit Dates subject to change at the whims of the publisher or distributor. Please see the Diamond Shipping Lists for current information.

Black Science #39: 19 Dec 2018


Black Science #40: 16 Jan 2019 News & FeaturesEdit


LinksEdit


Categories: Science Fiction Add category


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Contents Plot Edit Grant McKay, former member of The Anarchistic Order of Scientists, has finally done the impossible: He has deciphered Black Science and punched through the barriers of reality. Grant theorizes that each alternate reality of what he calls the "Eververse" is like an onion. Pierce into each and you discover a new dimension, one based an infinite variety of choices made by everyone everywhere. What lies at the center is perhaps the primal universe that started it all. What lies beyond the veil is not epiphany, however, but chaos. Now Grant and his team are lost; living ghosts shipwrecked on an infinite ocean of alien worlds, barreling through the long-forgotten, ancient, and unimaginable dark realms. The only way is forward.

Characters Edit Chandra - Second in command to Kadir. Grant McKay - Member of the Anarchist League of Scientists, father of Nathan and Pia McKay. Kadir - Bankrolled the Pillar project, often at odds with head scientist Grant McKay. Nathan McKay - Grant McKay's son, stranded with him in another dimension after the sabotage of the Pillar. Pia McKay - Grant McKay's daughter, stranded with him in another dimension after the sabotage of the Pillar. Rebecca - Scientist who worked on The Pillar and began an affair with Grant McKay. Shawn - Junior scientist on the Pillar project for the Anarchistic Order of Scientists. Ward - Ex-military, now security officer for the Anarchistic Order of Scientists and Grant McKay. Collected editions Edit Title Material collected Publication date ISBN Black Science Vol. 1: How to Fall Forever Black Science #1-6 May 2014 9781607069676 Black Science Vol. 2: Welcome, Nowhere Black Science #7-11 Jan 2015 9781632150189 Black Science Vol. 3: Vanishing Pattern Black Science #12-16 Aug 2015 9781632153951 Black Science Premiere Edition Vol. 1: The Beginner's Guide to Entropy Black Science #1-16 plus bonus material Feb 2016 9781632154934 Black Science Vol. 4: Godworld Black Science #17-21 May 2016 9781632156860 Black Science Vol. 5: True Atonement Black Science #22-25 Dec 2016 9781534300330 Black Science Vol. 6: Forbidden Realms and Hidden Truths Black Science #26-30 Jul 2017 9781534301825 Black Science Premiere Edition Vol. 2: Transcendentalism Black Science #17-30 plus bonus material Dec 2017 9781534303447 Black Science Vol. 7: Extinction is the Rule Black Science #31-34 Mar 2018 9781534304932 Black Science Vol. 8: Later Than You Think Black Science #35-38 Oct 2018 9781534306943 References Edit

Black Science Preview, www.comicbookresources.com, 2 July 2013
Aaron Long, Image Announces Second Printing for Black Science #4, www.comicosity.com, 3 April 2013

External links Edit Black Science at Image Comics Black Science at Comic Vine Comic Book DB

	This Image Comics-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

Talk Last edited 16 days ago by an anonymous user Wikipedia Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted. Terms of UsePrivacyDesktop

Black Science ReveiwsEdit

For quite some time now, Image Comics have held a creative edge over the comic industry by releasing titles with highly fleshed out characters, intelligent social and political commentary, damn good storytelling and superb artwork.

One such ongoing story is the intense sci-fi spectacle, Black Science, which is the brainchild of Tokyo Ghost writer Rick Remender and artists Matteo Scalera, Dean White and Moreno Dinsio. It's that perfect mix of edgy narrative, wild humour and captivating visuals. What's more, Black Science is a rabbit hole which keeps getting deeper and deeper. Each issue brings the characters closer to the end game of their quest. But with so many pitfalls along the way, its hard to work out when exactly the ending will come, or if it will indeed come at all.

But the story is made with such gripping and entertaining measure that readers aren't putting the comic down until that conclusion finally comes. For those who have not yet had the pleasure, observe the following pointers to find out exactly what is so great about Black Science, and why you should be reading it. Usually I can tell if I’m going to enjoy a comic book series by the end of the first issue. Black Science is an exception to that. I actually felt the first issue was pretty mediocre (which was a disappointment to me because I’m a big fan of writer Rick Remender). However, with last week’s NYCC sale on the majority of Image Comics’ catalog, I gave the series a second chance. I’m glad I did.

Black Science follows Grant McKay and his team of Dimensionauts, which accidentally includes Grant’s kids. The first issue actually joins the action in media res as Grant and one of his colleagues, Jen, rush through a prehistoric forest, chased by fish monsters riding giant eels.


They come to a cliff face and realize they have to turn and face the monsters. And this is where artist Mateo Scalera really first shows us the scope of the story.


In the midst of the action, we get Grant’s narration about making mistakes, and about how he should have learned from them. He also worries for his kids’ safety and “the Pillar”- which we learn shortly is the crux of the series- getting coolant. The fish people brutally murder Jen, and Grant races against time to make her death matter and save his family and team. It’s definitely problematic that the first female character we meet in the series is immediately fridged, but Remender is able to keep it from becoming cliche.

Grant comes across other natives, frog-men who carry electric eel-like bioelectric charges. After a couple brief skirmishes, Grant finds himself in the throne room of the frogmen, where a fish-woman is being forced to dance. Grant inserts himself into the situation, and rescues to fish-woman, while snagging a pitcher of fresh water to use as coolant for the Pillar.


By the way, the weapon McKay is holding there? The head of one of the frogmen, still carrying its bioelectric charge. Grant escapes the castle and finds himself directly in front of a group of the fishmen. Including, apparently, the slave-woman’s mate.


In gratitude, the fishmen hold off the frogmen so Grant can escape.


He makes it back to his team just in time to add the water to the Pillar, inspect his damaged invention (which he concludes was sabotaged) and inform the team of Jen’s death before they jump home. Or so they think.


Nope... they’re not in Kansas any more.

And that just covers the first issue.

On first read, it was a rousing action adventure tale, but it didn’t really grab me. Scalera drew a great alien world, and the character/monster designs were fantastic, but the writing didn’t grab me like Remender’s work normally did.

Then we hit the second issue. The first issue was a action movie. The second slows down a TEENY bit and starts building the characters, the backstory and the universe. We learn that the Pillar is a trans-universal portal which McKay and his team developed to travel through the multiverse, which Remender calls the Onion.

Seriously, I regret dismissing it the first time I read it. If I didn’t give it a second chance, I would have really missed out on an engaging science fantasy adventure. McKay is an interesting protagonist who gets more interesting as the first volume goes on, and there are several mysteries set up and paid off.

And I say science fantasy because the science is never explained. The Pillar is called black science, but it’s never given an explanation in volume 1 how it works or why. I wouldn’t let that stop you though. It’s a blast to read, and even though it takes more time in later issues to build its characters, it never slows down. The first six issues are one continuous action sequence. Even the single issue the team gets to rest turns into a car chase on a very alien Earth.

Even though the series explores alternate Earths, don’t expect something like the cult classic TV series Sliders or Marvel’s Exiles comic series. The Earths the Dimensionauts find themselves travelling through on their way through the Onion are alien worlds, with the only recognizable element being human beings (if they’re lucky).

This series comes highly recommended. After I finished reading issue #6, I immediately bought the next 7 issues because I had to know what happened next.

Basically there's a group of people being transported to different parallel universes at frequencies and locations completely out of their control. That by itself is fine, I think there is a lot of potential for various unique adventures in that concept. But unfortunately after reading the first 8 issues they all seem to be following the same formula. It's always a last minute emergency to make it back to the pillar before it automatically jumps to the next place. So far all but one of the places has been filled with savage beasts trying to kill the group. Because there is constant action, fighting these beasts, there is little room for character development. Which is a shame because there are the beginnings of what could be really interesting characters. The one place that didn't have people trying to kill the group wasn't expanded upon, you don't get any kind of look into what the world is like. Ultimately, I'm disappointed with how the series turned out. 8 people found this helpful Helpful Comment Report abuse GN Reader 4.0 out of 5 starsHard-Core, Fast Paced Sci-FI that satisfies! September 1, 2014 Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase If you liked Remender's Fear Agent, you should really like this new series. However, be warned this series is not as funny and the science is more dark and edgy. Of course, as with any good story, the science is not the main story driver. Instead, it is about a dysfunctional family trying to stay alive and stay together just long enough to get back home. Without giving away too much, I will tell you that Grant McCay, a rebellious genius who invented a machine that can access other dimensions, suddenly finds himself, his kids and coworkers jumping from one dangerous dimension to the next via a damaged machine. The art is excellent, very expressive and well suited to the story. The story starts off fast (akin to how Star Trek Into Darkness started) and never slows down. It is a fast paced enjoyable read that, like the pulp fiction of yesterday, ends with delightful cliffhangers (especially at the end of issue 6...but I won't give that away). The only negative I can think of is some folks may find it confusing how the story jumps back and forth from the past to the present and back again.

Do I recommend it and will I keep on reading it? I sure will for I definitely want to know how they resolve the surprise development that occurred at the end of issue six.

Note to Parents: There is some profanity (not excessive) and some implied sex. I don't think it is appropriate for pre-teens but I felt comfortable letting my teenager read it.

I primarily review graphic novels and my rating system is simple. 5 stars for books that I couldn't put down and read from start to finish in one sitting. 4 stars for excellent books that I highly recommend and will continue reading myself. 3 stars for books I liked and may recommend. 2 stars and below for books I would not recommend.

I hope this review helped. If it did, please click the yes button below. Thanks. Read more 52 people found this helpful Helpful Comment Report abuse Coulter Rail 5.0 out of 5 starsIrresponsible, intelligent, angry science fiction... perfect. August 29, 2015 Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase Temporal anarchy told through a guilty conscience. The only thing keeping the characters going is denial. You'd think it's supposed to be family, but its denial. Rick Reminder seems to have a knack for apocalyptic settings. The worlds always askew and the characters are tortured by their own mental makeup. Forcing a family to shift through dimensions, battle reality, accompanied by traitors, adulterers, and malcontents is right up Remenders alley. I've read Strange Girl, Low, Deadly Class, etc... but this feels like him at his full strength and polished.

The artwork and world designs are supreme. Don't get caught in the fast lane of dialogue. You'll miss some gorgeous artwork. If you're a sci-fi savvy adult then this is for you. Yes, adult. If you're still under 21 you haven't F'd up enough of your life to really regret the full effect. *kidding* Enjoy! 2 people found this helpful Helpful Comment Report abuse AParkRTop Contributor: DC Comics 4.0 out of 5 starsPulp-style sci-fi with a twist!!!! May 8, 2015 Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase I want to start out by saying that Black Science is a twist on the Flash Gordon/Buck Rogers type of adventure science-fiction. For starters, the story doesn't center around one particular hero/heroine, even though it initially looks that way. I actually enjoyed the fact of this book being more of an ensemble cast where everyone has to step up and contribute to the survival of the group as they're all being teleported to different, random dimensions. It also becomes apparent that some of your favorite characters may not survive. It has some elements of superhero comics in terms of action and dynamism without being too "over the top." I really enjoyed Rick Remender's "End League" and the first few chapters of "Fear Agent", and I'm enjoying this book, thus far. Artists Matteo Scalera and Dean White turn in some fine work, displaying a nice balance between cartoony and grittiness as well as capturing the bizarre convincingly. There is profanity in the book, but Remender has the restraint not to go overboard with it. The characters are real people instead of the archetypes (stereotypes) usually portrayed in these types of stories.

I can hardly wait to read the second volume of this story. One person found this helpful Helpful Comment Report abuse Miskatonic 5.0 out of 5 starsLike Sliders but far better! August 25, 2015 Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase Black Science reminds me of the TV show Sliders. Sliders was a low budget show in which the characters were randomly sliding to alternate universes. Characters would meet doppelgangers of themselves and sometimes end up in universes where dinosaurs were still walking around. The premise behind Black Science is very similar but not exactly the same.

The drawings for Black Sciences are beautiful, dark and very creepy. The story lines present a real sense of danger for the characters and the characters themselves are somewhat more than two dimensional. No matter what you thought of Sliders; if you enjoy great science fiction you should be reading Black Science! 3 people found this helpful ext time you want to give something new a try, pick up Black Science. It’ll be worth the time and money.

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CBR EXCLUSIVES COMIC NEWS MOVIE NEWS TV NEWS LISTS COMMUNITY MORE Remender & Scalera's Black Science Enters a New Dimension of Action by Dave Richards – on Oct 11, 2017 in CBR Exclusives, Comics, Comic News ADVERTISING


https://www.cbr.com/rick-remender-black-science-interview/ The


In the opening arc of writer Rick Remender and artist Matteo Scalera's creator-owned Image Comic series Black Science, scientist Grant McKay took his friends and family on a dimension-hopping jaunt across the many realities of the “Eververse.” That dangerous odyssey cost McKay his intellect, his family and the lives of a number of his friends. But worse still is that, at the end of the most recent arc, a number of the monsters and alien menaces McKay and his team encountered in their interdimensional trek followed them back to their home reality.

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RELATED: Rick Remender Talks New Studio, Comic Work Update

In Black Science #31, released last month, Remender and Scalera kicked off a new arc that sees McKay dealing with the chaos of the invasion and reuniting with some of his long-lost family. CBR spoke with Remender about the arc, how McKay and his daughter Pia are handling the loss of his intellect and her absorption of it, and how the series will run quite a bit longer than Remender originally anticipated.

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CBR: A while back you pledged a return to the fun, velocity and chaos of Black Science's original arc, and recent issues fulfilled that promise and then some with the fire ghosts and the millipede death cult running loose on Earth. How does it feel to get to this part of your larger story? And will things slow down at all from here on out?

Rick Remender: No, we're in the chaos zone. Matteo and I have already finished issues #32 and #33.

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It's odd, because I wrote this one so long ago that when I came back to it I had to ask Matteo, “Our initial intention was to go crazy, but is this too crazy?” [Laughs] He then talked me down and we went over the story, picked at it, and made sure we were still into it. We both agreed that we are still into it.

We took a bit of a breather in the book to do some character work and get into some of the human circumstances of Kadir, Sarah and Pia, and some of the other cast on Earth, like Grant, who was in the asylum. I find if I'm just doing the slow character-building stuff and the build of the tension that there's not enough action. Then once I get into the action I'm like, “There's not enough character work!” So I'm never confident with what we're doing in anything I've ever written. [Laughs] I'm always second-guessing everything, which can be good and bad.

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[vn_gallery name="Black Science #32" id="1170661"]

Every single thing we've seen in every issue plays a role in what's coming. That was the fun idea of the whole thing. We're going to go travel and do all these crazy things. We're going to bounce around all these different dimensions and meet all these different characters, and then we're going to smash all of them together on the real Earth in this arc.

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[Laughs] It's a tremendous amount of fun. I wish I could talk more about what's coming up. I could just sit here and create goofy characters and strange shit and have Matteo Scalera draw them for the rest of my life and I would be happy. Him and our colorist Morino Diniso are so phenomenal together, and I'm cooking up scenes where I'm apologizing in the script. I'm like, “I know that's a lot of stuff and I'm super-sorry. That's what we agreed on, though, right?”


He comes back with stuff that's so lavish and cuts no corners. It's just incredible. So the crazy gets continuously turned up here for a good four to five issues.

One of the most fun, goofy and ridiculously enjoyable characters Matteo brought to life in issues #30 and #31 was Har'Logh the Defiler, the giant pink demon creature that reminded me of a Muppet. Who came up with Har'Logh's appearance?


[Laughs] Matteo came up with the idea to make him a cute and fuzzy thing. I don't remember what I originally described Har'Logh as, but when I got Matteo's pages and called him on Skype I was like, “Dude that's just a big teddy bear right there.” He was like, “Yeah, it's a big teddy bear.” Then I was like, “Oh, for the demon! Oh, my God!” Once he told me I was like, “Yes!” So I got to write all of the same dialogue for this horrible demon creature, but it's coming out of this giant, fuzzy teddy bear from a dimension where Care Bear-like creatures are devils. That was so much fun and so ridiculous.

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The last arc ended with the death of one of the series' major villains, the Mister Block of Grant's world, correct?

Yes, that was the Block from Grant's world. He paid the price for his shenanigans, but before dying he revealed that he was from another dimension and had been traveling around spreading his industry from dimension to dimension. It always led to the same sort of chaos.

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PAGE 2: BLACK SCIENCE'S END ISN'T IN SIGHT JUST YET 1 2 TAGS: Black Science


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CBR EXCLUSIVES COMIC NEWS MOVIE NEWS TV NEWS LISTS COMMUNITY MORE Remender & Scalera's Black Science Enters a New Dimension of Action by Dave Richards – on Oct 11, 2017 in CBR Exclusives, Comics, Comic News ADVERTISING


https://www.cbr.com/rick-remender-black-science-interview/ In the opening arc of writer Rick Remender and artist Matteo Scalera's creator-owned Image Comic series Black Science, scientist Grant McKay took his friends and family on a dimension-hopping jaunt across the many realities of the “Eververse.” That dangerous odyssey cost McKay his intellect, his family and the lives of a number of his friends. But worse still is that, at the end of the most recent arc, a number of the monsters and alien menaces McKay and his team encountered in their interdimensional trek followed them back to their home reality.

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RELATED: Rick Remender Talks New Studio, Comic Work Update

In Black Science #31, released last month, Remender and Scalera kicked off a new arc that sees McKay dealing with the chaos of the invasion and reuniting with some of his long-lost family. CBR spoke with Remender about the arc, how McKay and his daughter Pia are handling the loss of his intellect and her absorption of it, and how the series will run quite a bit longer than Remender originally anticipated.

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CBR: A while back you pledged a return to the fun, velocity and chaos of Black Science's original arc, and recent issues fulfilled that promise and then some with the fire ghosts and the millipede death cult running loose on Earth. How does it feel to get to this part of your larger story? And will things slow down at all from here on out?

Rick Remender: No, we're in the chaos zone. Matteo and I have already finished issues #32 and #33.

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It's odd, because I wrote this one so long ago that when I came back to it I had to ask Matteo, “Our initial intention was to go crazy, but is this too crazy?” [Laughs] He then talked me down and we went over the story, picked at it, and made sure we were still into it. We both agreed that we are still into it.

We took a bit of a breather in the book to do some character work and get into some of the human circumstances of Kadir, Sarah and Pia, and some of the other cast on Earth, like Grant, who was in the asylum. I find if I'm just doing the slow character-building stuff and the build of the tension that there's not enough action. Then once I get into the action I'm like, “There's not enough character work!” So I'm never confident with what we're doing in anything I've ever written. [Laughs] I'm always second-guessing everything, which can be good and bad.

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[vn_gallery name="Black Science #32" id="1170661"]

Every single thing we've seen in every issue plays a role in what's coming. That was the fun idea of the whole thing. We're going to go travel and do all these crazy things. We're going to bounce around all these different dimensions and meet all these different characters, and then we're going to smash all of them together on the real Earth in this arc.

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[Laughs] It's a tremendous amount of fun. I wish I could talk more about what's coming up. I could just sit here and create goofy characters and strange shit and have Matteo Scalera draw them for the rest of my life and I would be happy. Him and our colorist Morino Diniso are so phenomenal together, and I'm cooking up scenes where I'm apologizing in the script. I'm like, “I know that's a lot of stuff and I'm super-sorry. That's what we agreed on, though, right?”

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He comes back with stuff that's so lavish and cuts no corners. It's just incredible. So the crazy gets continuously turned up here for a good four to five issues.

One of the most fun, goofy and ridiculously enjoyable characters Matteo brought to life in issues #30 and #31 was Har'Logh the Defiler, the giant pink demon creature that reminded me of a Muppet. Who came up with Har'Logh's appearance?

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[Laughs] Matteo came up with the idea to make him a cute and fuzzy thing. I don't remember what I originally described Har'Logh as, but when I got Matteo's pages and called him on Skype I was like, “Dude that's just a big teddy bear right there.” He was like, “Yeah, it's a big teddy bear.” Then I was like, “Oh, for the demon! Oh, my God!” Once he told me I was like, “Yes!” So I got to write all of the same dialogue for this horrible demon creature, but it's coming out of this giant, fuzzy teddy bear from a dimension where Care Bear-like creatures are devils. That was so much fun and so ridiculous.

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The last arc ended with the death of one of the series' major villains, the Mister Block of Grant's world, correct?

Yes, that was the Block from Grant's world. He paid the price for his shenanigans, but before dying he revealed that he was from another dimension and had been traveling around spreading his industry from dimension to dimension. It always led to the same sort of chaos.

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PAGE 2: BLACK SCIENCE'S END ISN'T IN SIGHT JUST YET 1 2 TAGS: Black Science



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TheRichest Unique lists featuring pop culture, entertainment and crazy facts. Screen Rant Covering the hottest movie and TV topics that fans want. TheThings The most LOL-worthy things the Internet has to offer. TheSportster A fresh take on sports: the biggest news and most entertaining lists. TheTalko The only place to satisfy all of your guilty pleasures. CBR The go-to source for comic book and superhero movie fans. BabyGaga Pregnancy and parenting news, given to you in a way nobody else has. TheQuiz The Most Entertaining Quiz Site In The World. HotCars The World's Most Entertaining Car Website TheGamer A one-stop shop for all things video games. Moms Website for moms seeking advice, community, and entertainment. TheTravel Simply the World’s Most Interesting Travel Site.

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