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Holo Space

Holo Space or Holographic Space is a Holographic universe,that represents all data existing in Real Time Space.It is perhaps not as large as real space. Holospace Holospace


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Holo Space is a fictional extradimensional plane of existence inhabited by many ancient races-Elder Superbeings from Atlantis,Sidairian,Asguard,Olympians of extremely powerful, hyper-intelligent beings,that is a copy of the multiverse,existing with the Maveric Universe.

a non-linear temporal phenomenon capable of delivering an individual to a non-corporeal Utopian existence.


Ascension is a process by which sufficiently-evolved sentient beings may shed their physical bodies and live eternally as pure energy on a higher plane of existence full of knowledge and power. It is a mental, spiritual or evolutionary enlightenment that can arise as the direct result of achieving a certain level of wisdom and self-knowledge

In a holographic universe, even time and space could no longer be viewed as fundamentals. Because concepts such as location break down in a universe in which nothing is truly separate from anything else, time and three-dimensional space, like the images of the fish on the TV monitors, would also have to be viewed as projections of this deeper order. At its deeper level reality is a sort of superhologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the superholographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past. What else the superhologram contains is an open-ended question. Allowing, for the sake of argument, that the superhologram is the matrix that has given birth to everything in our universe, at the very least it contains every subatomic particle that has been or will be -- every configuration of matter and energy that is possible, from snowflakes to quasars, from blue whales to gamma rays. It must be seen as a sort of cosmic storehouse of "All That Is."At its deeper level reality is a sort of super hologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the super holographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past.


Write the text of your article here!

Holo Space is a fictional extradimensional plane of existence inhabited by many ancient races-Elder Superbeings from Atlantis,Sidairian,Asguard,Olympians of extremely powerful, hyper-intelligent beings,that is a copy of the multiverse,existing with the Maveric Universe.

a non-linear temporal phenomenon capable of delivering an individual to a non-corporeal Utopian existence.


Ascension is a process by which sufficiently-evolved sentient beings may shed their physical bodies and live eternally as pure energy on a higher plane of existence full of knowledge and power. It is a mental, spiritual or evolutionary enlightenment that can arise as the direct result of achieving a certain level of wisdom and self-knowledge

In a holographic universe, even time and space could no longer be viewed as fundamentals. Because concepts such as location break down in a universe in which nothing is truly separate from anything else, time and three-dimensional space, like the images of the fish on the TV monitors, would also have to be viewed as projections of this deeper order. At its deeper level reality is a sort of superhologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the superholographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past. What else the superhologram contains is an open-ended question. Allowing, for the sake of argument, that the superhologram is the matrix that has given birth to everything in our universe, at the very least it contains every subatomic particle that has been or will be -- every configuration of matter and energy that is possible, from snowflakes to quasars, from blue whales to gamma rays. It must be seen as a sort of cosmic storehouse of "All That Is."At its deeper level reality is a sort of super hologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the super holographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past.

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Matrix about a group of heroes who fight a desperate war against machine overlords that have enslaved humanity in an extremely sophisticated virtual reality system. The series is most notable for its use of slow motion, which revolutionized action films to come. The series depicts a future in which Earth is dominated by artificial intelligence that was created early in the 21st century and rebelled against humanity. At one point, humans attempted to block out the machines' source of solar power by covering the sky in thick, stormy clouds. During this time, the machines and mankind were engaged in a massive war in which the machines ultimately emerged the victor. Having no definite source of energy, the machines devised a way to extract humans' bioelectricity and thermal energy by growing people in pods, while their minds are controlled by cybernetic implants connecting them to a simulated reality called the Matrix.

The virtual reality world simulated by the Matrix resembles human civilization around the turn of the 21st century (this time period was chosen because it is supposedly the pinnacle of human civilization). The majority of the stories in the Matrix franchise take place in a vast Western World unnamed megacity. This environment is practically indistinguishable from reality (although scenes set within the Matrix are presented on-screen with a green tint to the footage, and a general bias towards the color green), and the majority of bluepills - humans connected to the Matrix - are unaware of its true nature. Most of the central characters in the series are able to gain superhuman abilities within the Matrix by taking advantage of their understanding of its true nature to manipulate its virtual physical laws.

The virtual world is first introduced in The Matrix. The Animatrix short film "The Second Renaissance" and the short comic Bits and Pieces of Information show how the initial conflict between humans and machines came about, and how and why the Matrix was first developed. Its history and purpose are further explained in The Matrix Reloaded. Contents Plot Edit Six months after the events of the first film, Neo (Keanu Reeves) and Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) are now romantically involved. Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) receives a message from Captain Niobe (Jada Pinkett Smith) of the Logos calling an emergency meeting of all of Zion's ships. Zion has confirmed the last transmission of the Osiris: an army of Sentinels is tunneling towards Zion and will reach it within 72 hours. Commander Lock (Harry Lennix) orders all ships to return to Zion to prepare for the onslaught, but Morpheus asks one ship to remain in order to contact the Oracle (Gloria Foster). The Caduceus receives a message from the Oracle, and the Nebuchadnezzar ventures out so Neo can contact her. One of the Caduceus crew, Bane (Ian Bliss), encounters Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving), who absorbs his avatar whilst killing him in the process. Smith then uses this avatar to leave the Matrix, gaining control of Bane's real body.

In Zion, Morpheus announces the news of the advancing machines to the people. Neo receives a message from the Oracle and returns to the Matrix to meet her bodyguard Seraph (Collin Chou), who then leads him to her. After realizing that the Oracle is part of the Matrix, Neo asks how he can trust her; she replies that it is his decision. The Oracle instructs Neo to reach the Source of the Matrix with the help of the Keymaker (Randall Duk Kim), a prisoner of the Merovingian (Lambert Wilson). As the Oracle departs, Smith appears, telling Neo that after being defeated, he refused to be deleted, and is now a rogue program. He demonstrates his ability to clone himself using other inhabitants of the Matrix, including other Agents, as hosts. He then tries to absorb Neo as a host, but fails, prompting a battle between Smith's clones and Neo. Neo manages to defend himself, but is forced to retreat from the increasingly overwhelming numbers.

Neo, Morpheus, and Trinity visit the Merovingian and ask for the Keymaker, but the Merovingian refuses. His wife Persephone (Monica Bellucci), seeking revenge on her husband for his infidelity, betrays him and leads the trio to the Keymaker. The Merovingian soon arrives with his men. Morpheus, Trinity, and the Keymaker escape, while Neo holds off the Merovingian's servants. Morpheus and Trinity try to escape with the Keymaker on the freeway, facing several Agents and the Twins, the Merovingian's chief henchmen. Morpheus defeats the Twins, Trinity escapes, and Neo flies in to save Morpheus and the Keymaker from Agent Johnson. In the real world, Zion's remaining ships prepare to battle the machines.

Within the Matrix, the crews of the Nebuchadnezzar, Vigilant and Logos help the Keymaker and Neo reach the door to the Source. The crew of the Logos must destroy a power plant in the Matrix to prevent a security system from being triggered, and the crew of the Vigilant must destroy a back-up power station. The Logos succeeds, while the Vigilant is bombed by a Sentinel in the real world, killing everyone on board. Seraph (Collin Chou), who then leads him to her. After realizing that the Oracle is part of the Matrix, Neo asks how he can trust her; she replies that it is his decision. The Oracle instructs Neo to reach the Source of the Matrix with the help of the Keymaker (Randall Duk Kim), a prisoner of the Merovingian (Lambert Wilson). As the Oracle departs, Smith appears, telling Neo that after being defeated, he refused to be deleted, and is now a rogue program. He demonstrates his ability to clone himself using other inhabitants of the Matrix, including other Agents, as hosts. He then tries to absorb Neo as a host, but fails, prompting a battle between Smith's clones and Neo. Neo manages to defend himself, but is forced to retreat from the increasingly overwhelming numbers.

Neo, Morpheus, and Trinity visit the Merovingian and ask for the Keymaker, but the Merovingian refuses. His wife Persephone (Monica Bellucci), seeking revenge on her husband for his infidelity, betrays him and leads the trio to the Keymaker. The Merovingian soon arrives with his men. Morpheus, Trinity, and the Keymaker escape, while Neo holds off the Merovingian's servants. Morpheus and Trinity try to escape with the Keymaker on the freeway, facing several Agents and the Twins, the Merovingian's chief henchmen. Morpheus defeats the Twins, Trinity escapes, and Neo flies in to save Morpheus and the Keymaker from Agent Johnson. In the real world, Zion's remaining ships prepare to battle the machines.

Within the Matrix, the crews of the Nebuchadnezzar, Vigilant and Logos help the Keymaker and Neo reach the door to the Source. The crew of the Logos must destroy a power plant in the Matrix to prevent a security system from being triggered, and the crew of the Vigilant must destroy a back-up power station. The Logos succeeds, while the Vigilant is bombed by a Sentinel in the real world, killing everyone on board. Although Neo asked Trinity to remain on the Nebuchadnezzar due to getting a premonition of her death, she enters the Matrix to replace the Vigilant crew and complete their mission. However, her escape is compromised by Agent Thompson, and they fight. As Neo, Morpheus, and the Keymaker try to reach the Source, the Smiths appear and attack them. The Keymaker unlocks the door to the Source, allowing Neo and Morpheus to enter and escape from the Smiths, but the Smiths shoot the Keymaker dead while he tries to close the door to the Source. Neo enters a door and meets a program called the Architect, the creator of the Matrix.

The Architect explains that Neo is an intentional part of the design of the sixth iteration of Matrix, designed to combine the anomalies and stop the fatal system crash that naturally occurs due to the concept of human choice. As with the five previous Ones, Neo can choose either to return to the Source with his unique code to reboot the Matrix and pick survivors to begin to repopulate the soon-to-be-destroyed Zion, or cause the Matrix to crash and kill everyone connected to it; combined with Zion's destruction, this would mean mankind's extinction. Neo learns of Trinity's situation and chooses to save her instead of returning to the Source. As she falls off a building, getting shot in the process, Neo flies in and catches her. He then phases his hand into her body and removes a bullet from her body, restarts her heart and revives her from death. They return to the real world and are attacked by Sentinels. The Nebuchadnezzar gets destroyed, but the crew escape. Neo displays a new ability to disable the machines with his thoughts, but falls into a coma from the effort. The crew are picked up by another ship, the Hammer. Its captain, Roland, reveals the other ships were wiped out by the machines after someone activated an EMP too early, and that they found only one survivor afterwards—revealed to be the Smith-possessed Bane. Contents Plot Edit Neo and Bane lie unconscious in the medical bay of the ship Hammer. Meanwhile, Neo finds his digital self trapped in a virtual subway station – named, "Mobil Ave", "mobil", being an anagram for "limbo" – a transition zone between the Matrix and the Machine City. In that subway station, he meets a "family" of programs, including a girl named Sati, whose father tells Neo the subway is controlled by the Trainman, an exiled program loyal to the Merovingian. When Neo tries to board a train with the family, the Trainman refuses and overpowers him.

Seraph contacts Morpheus and Trinity on behalf of the Oracle, who informs them of Neo's confinement. Seraph, Morpheus and Trinity enter Club Hel, where they confront the Merovingian and force him to release Neo. Troubled by visions of the Machine City, Neo visits the Oracle, who reveals that Smith intends to destroy both the Matrix and the real world. She states that "everything that has a beginning has an end", and that the war will conclude. After Neo leaves, a large group of Smiths assimilates Sati, Seraph and the unresisting Oracle, gaining her powers of precognition.

In the real world, the crew of the Nebuchadnezzar and the Hammer find and reactivate Niobe's ship, the Logos. They interrogate Bane, who says that he has no recollection of the earlier massacre. As the captains plan their defense of Zion, Neo requests a ship to travel to the Machine City. Motivated by her encounter with the Oracle, Niobe offers him the Logos. Neo departs, accompanied by Trinity. Bane, who has stowed away on the Logos, takes Trinity hostage. Neo realizes that Bane has been assimilated by Smith and a fight ensues. Bane cauterizes Neo's eyes with a power cable, blinding him; however, Neo discovers an ability to perceive the world as golden light. Neo kills Bane, and Trinity pilots them to the Machine City.

Niobe and Morpheus set out for Zion with the Hammer to aid the human defenses against the Sentinels. In Zion, the fatally wounded Captain Mifune instructs Kid to open the gate for the Hammer. When it arrives, it discharges its EMP, disabling the Sentinels but also the remaining defenses. The humans are forced to retreat and wait for the next attack, thinking that it will be their last stand. Near the Machine City, Neo and Trinity are greeted by thousands of missiles which Neo attempts to destroy, but is overwhelmed by their numbers. The Logos is attacked by the Sentinels forcing them to fly above the missiles for a few seconds. They breach the cloud layer and see Earth's real sky, to which Trinity whispers the word "Beautiful". Upon descent, they lose control causing them to crash the Logos into the Machine City. The crash kills Trinity. Neo enters the Machine City and encounters "Deus Ex Machina", the machine leader. Neo, warning that Smith plans to conquer both the Matrix and the real world, offers to stop Smith in exchange for peace with Zion. The machine leader agrees, and the Sentinels stop attacking Zion. The Machines provide a connection for Neo to enter the Matrix. Inside, the Smith with the Oracle's powers steps forth, saying that he has foreseen his victory against Neo. After a protracted battle, Neo – finding himself unable to defeat Smith – allows himself to be assimilated. The machine leader sends a surge of energy into Neo's body in the real world. Because Neo is connected to the Source, the energy surge causes the Neo-Smith clone and all other Smith clones in the Matrix to be destroyed; deleting Smith once and for all, though Neo's life is sacrificed in the process. The Sentinels withdraw from Zion, Morpheus and Niobe embrace, and Neo's body is carried away by the machines. The Matrix is rebooted, and the Architect encounters the Oracle in a park. They agree that the peace will last "as long as it can", and that all humans will be offered the opportunity to leave the Matrix. When questioned about Neo's fate, the Oracle tells Sati that she thinks they will see Neo again as Sati reveals she created a beautiful sunrise over the horizon in Neo's honor. Seraph asks the Oracle if she knew this would happen; she replies that she did not know, but she believed.


Dreamscape


Holographic Space


Holo Deck


Nexus Coil The Nexus was an extra-dimensional realm in which one's thoughts and desires shaped reality. Inside the Nexus, time and space had no meaning, allowing one to visit any time and any place that one could imagine. The doorway to the Nexus was a violent, destructive temporal energy ribbon which crossed through the galaxy every 39.1 years, among others in 2293, 2332, and 2371.

Contents[hide] Enterprise-B incident Soran's attempt to return to the Nexus In the Nexus Appendices Background information Apocrypha External link Enterprise-B incident Edit SS Lakul The Lakul trapped in the ribbon

Starfleet first encountered this phenomenon in 2293, when the newly-christened USS Enterprise-B responded to a distress call from two vessels transporting El-Aurian refugees to Earth. Arriving at the vessels' location, the Enterprise found them trapped in a powerful gravimetric field emanating from the trailing edge of the energy ribbon.

Arriving too late to save the first ship, the SS Robert Fox, the Enterprise moved into transporter range in an attempt to beam aboard the crew and passengers from the other, the SS Lakul. The crew experienced difficulty in maintaining a transporter lock on them, however, as their life signs were experiencing a state of temporal flux, phasing in and out of the spacetime continuum. As the Lakul began to lose structural integrity, the transporter was initiated, but the crew was only able to save 47 people out of 150, including El-Aurians Guinan and Tolian Soran.

Afterward, the Enterprise itself became caught in the gravimetric field, and was unable to escape. Scotty, who was attending the maiden voyage of the vessel along with Captain Kirk and Commander Pavel Chekov, realized that a resonance burst fired from the main deflector might disrupt the field long enough for the ship to break free. Although this was successful, Captain Kirk himself was pulled into the Nexus when an energy discharge from the ribbon impacted the section of the ship where Kirk was modifying the deflector relays. For the next seventy-eight years it was believed that Kirk had died a hero. (Star Trek Generations)

Soran's attempt to return to the Nexus Edit Soran enters the Nexus Soran about to enter the Nexus

Before being rescued by the Enterprise, the El-Aurians experienced brief moments inside the Nexus, where all of their desires became reality. Soran became obsessed with returning, and dedicated himself to discovering a way to safely re-enter the Nexus, rather than the more random possibility of flying into it in a ship in the hope that he would be taken into the Nexus before his ship was destroyed.

By 2371, he had developed a plan to destroy two stars, altering the gravitational forces influencing the ribbon and bringing it to the planet Veridian III, where Soran would be waiting for it. Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the USS Enterprise-D discovered the nature of Soran's plot, and realized that, by destroying the Veridian star, he would also destroy all of the planets in the Veridian system, including Veridian IV, a planet with a pre-industrial population of 230 million. Picard confronted Soran on Veridian III in an attempt to stop him, but was unsuccessful in preventing Soran from destroying the star. As all planets in the Veridian system were destroyed, as was the Enterprise-D, both Picard and Soran were pulled into the Nexus.

Picard and Kirk leaving the Nexus Kirk and Picard leave the Nexus

While inside, Picard encountered Guinan, who described herself as an "echo" of the version of Guinan who once visited the Nexus, allowing him to realize what had happened to him despite experiencing his perfect world. With Guinan's advice reminding him of his responsibilities outside the Nexus, Picard located Kirk, who, from his point of view, had only just entered the Nexus after his loss on the Enterprise-B.

Picard initially had difficulty in persuading Kirk to leave the Nexus, as Kirk saw it as his opportunity to correct the mistakes of his past. Kirk soon realized, however, that the events which transpired in the Nexus were not real, but rather a complicated illusion, and agreed to join Picard, recognizing that the fundamental unreality of the Nexus meant that the one thing it could never offer him was the one thing he had always wanted; the chance to make a difference. Due to the timeless nature of the Nexus, the two captains were able to leave and arrive on Veridian III at a point in time before Soran destroyed the star. Teaming up to fight him, they were successful in changing history and stopping Soran, but unfortunately Kirk was killed in the process. (Star Trek Generations)

In the Nexus Edit Picard Kirk riding Kirk and Picard in the Nexus

Describing the Nexus to Captain Picard, Guinan described it as like "being inside joy." Inside the Nexus, all of a person's desires become reality, and one can reshape that reality to visit any time and any place one chooses.

Picard's version of the Nexus was of a family he never had. He had two sons – Matthew and Thomas – and three daughters – Olivia, Mimi, and Madison. They lived, with his wife, in a beautiful house, and his nephew René, who had recently died in a fire in the real world, was still alive.

Kirk's version was initially being at his log cabin in the mountains, which he had previously sold. While there, he reunited with his dog Butler, and had the chance to propose marriage to Antonia, a woman whom he had regretted leaving to return to Starfleet. Later, he experienced his uncle's farm in Idaho, where he went horseback riding with Captain Picard. (Star Trek Generations)

Appendices Edit Background information Edit In an early version of the Star Trek: Generations script, Guinan explains that her experience with the Nexus and the Enterprise-B are responsible for her "sixth sense" that lets her perceive people and events outside of linear time.

Ronald D. Moore commented:

"Guinan, Soran, and the other El-Aurians are in some kind of transitional phase going into the Nexus when their ships begin exploding. The Enterprise-B beams them away at a crucial moment that brings their physical bodies back, but leaves behind some kind of "echo" (at least for Guinan – whether or not Soren also left behind an "echo" was the subject of much debate and many rewrites, some including a Soren doppelganger and some even including a meeting between the two Sorens in the Nexus). The momentary sensation of being in the Nexus leaves both Guinan and Soren with an almost overpowering desire to return. When Kirk is pulled into the Nexus, there's no transporter beam to yank him away and hence, he's completely left inside. When Picard and Soren enter the Nexus years later, they too are pulled in completely and the idea of an "echo" should not apply since it was the direct result of a transporter fluke in a very specific instance." (AOL chat, 1997) Apocrypha Edit The novelization of Star Trek Generations expands on Kirk's fantasies in the Nexus, with its timeless nature allowing him to experience multiple events while still feeling like no actual time has passed. After Picard enters the Nexus, the novel depicts one fantasy where Kirk is preparing for his wedding to Carol Marcus with all his friends and colleagues from the Enterprise – with Leonard McCoy expressing shock at the idea of Spock having brought a date and David Marcus giving his mother away at the altar– as well as referencing other encounters with other women from his past, including an occasion where he managed to save Edith Keeler and preserve the future.

In the novel Engines of Destiny, a confrontation between an alternate Guinan and the Guardian of Forever reveals that the version of Guinan in the Nexus is the source of her constant "feelings," as this version of herself exists outside all time, and can thus reach out to her other selves and provide valuable insight into possible actions that must be taken, although even she is ignorant of what the definitive outcome will be in the end.

During the novel, Scotty travels back in time in a Klingon Bird-of-Prey with the intention of beaming Kirk out of the Enterprise-B before he falls into the Nexus – believing that this will ensure Kirk's survival without actually changing history – only for history to change so that the Borg conquer the Alpha Quadrant (the reason for this chain of events is never explicitly revealed to the characters, but the evidence provided to the reader suggests that this is due to the Borg's invasion of the past in Star Trek: First Contact succeeding as Picard apparently failed to survive his confrontation with Soran without Kirk's aid). At the novel's conclusion, history is restored when the Enterprise-D – which had followed Scotty into the past and thus been protected from the changes in history – manages to send Kirk back into the Nexus in the new timeline, undoing all subsequent events.

In The Next Generation - Q Continuum, it is revealed that the Nexus was created from a solar flare by a very much younger Q during an idle moment in his "childhood," but he was ignorant of what had become of it.

In the Star Trek: Stargazer novel Oblivion, chronicling Guinan's "first" meeting with Picard (discounting Picard's meeting with Guinan's past self in "Time's Arrow"), it reveals that, after her initial encounter with the Nexus, Guinan was left in a deep state of depression, mourning the loss of the reality she had in the Nexus, where all the family she lost to the Borg – including her youngest daughter, the one who was most like her – were restored to her. She experiences a particularly bleak mood after the Nexus passes through the galaxy once again, but after meeting with Picard, who subsequently risks his mission to save her, Guinan overcomes her depression, realizing that the universe can still give her joy and friendship even outside the Nexus.

In Star Trek: Armada, a Borg starbase is called a Nexus.

The novel The Final Nexus details a series of intergalactic transport gates called Nexuses, which operate much like the Iconian gateways.

The Nexus makes an appearance in the Star Trek Online mission "Beyond the Nexus", as part of the celebration of the 30th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation. When the Nexus makes its passage again in 2410, 39.1 years after the events in Star Trek Generations, Starfleet receives distress call from the USS Forrestal, an Ambassador class vessel that disappeared in the Nexus during its passing in 2332. The player character is teamed with Captain Geordi La Forge and the USS Challenger to discover that the Forrestal and the Galaxy class USS Madison, which had been sent to investigate, have been taken over by a psionic entity called Khaj'Buur, who was imprisoned in the Nexus. It is mentioned in the mission's conclusion that Khaj'Buur's desire to leave the Nexus is highly unusual, considering its paradise-like nature.


Marvel Comics Dimensions Multiverse (Marvel Comics) Learn more This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Within Marvel Comics, most tales take place within the fictional Marvel Universe, which in turn is part of a larger multiverse. Starting with issues of Captain Britain, the main continuity in which most Marvel storylines take place was designated Earth-616, and the multiverse was established as being protected by Merlyn. Each universe has a Captain Britain designated to protect its version of the British Isles. These protectors are collectively known as the Captain Britain Corps. This numerical notation was continued in the series Excalibur and other titles. Each universe of the Multiverse in Marvel also appears to be defended by a Sorcerer Supreme at nearly all times, appointed by the mystic trinity of Vishanti to defend the world against threats primarily magical in nature from within and beyond and bearing the Eye of Agamotto.

Later on, many writers would utilize and reshape the Multiverse in titles such as Exiles, X-Men, and Ultimate Fantastic Four. New universes would also spin out of storylines involving time-traveling characters such as Rachel Summers, Cable, and Bishop, as their actions rendered their home times alternate timelines.

Contents Concept Edit The Multiverse is the collection of alternate universes that share a universal hierarchy. A large variety of these universes were originated from another due to a major decision on the part of a character. Some can seem to be taking place in the past or future due to differences in how time passes in each universe. Often, new universes are born due to time traveling; another name for these new universes is an "alternate timeline". Earth-616 is the established main universe where the majority of Marvel books take place.

Nature of the Multiverse Edit According to Forge, mutants living on these alternate Earths have lost their powers due to M-Day, as stated in "Endangered Species"; however, this mass depowering has not been seen in any of Marvel's current alternate reality publications such as Exiles, the Ultimate titles, Amazing Spider-Girl, the Marvel Adventures titles or GeNext, though it is possible that the issue of time may be related to their exclusion. This was apparently retconned during the "X-Men: Messiah Complex" storyline, where Forge stated that all mutants in possible future timelines were depowered, not in parallel universes.[1] This, in addition to A.R.M.O.R.'s observation that Lyra arrived from an alternate reality[2] indicates that the topology of the Marvel Multiverse is based on new realities branching off from key nodes of a timeline instead of strictly parallel dimensions.

Other realities Edit See also: List of Marvel Comics dimensions Not every alternate reality is an entire independent universe, but instead maintain a parasitic relationship to a parent reality. Others can exist outside the multiversal structure altogether.

Pocket universes Edit Counter-Earth (Heroes Reborn): A pocket dimension where Franklin Richards stored many of Earth's superheroes after the events surrounding the appearance of Onslaught. Doom saved Counter-Earth from the unstable pocket dimension and placed it in an alternate orbit of the Earth-616 on the other side of the sun. The Hill: A dangerous pocket dimension used by Mikhail Rasputin after flooding the Morlock tunnels. Rasputin brought all Morlocks to the Hill to raise them in a survival-of-the-fittest mentality. In this dimension, time runs several times faster. While in Earth-616 only one or two years passed, more than 10 years passed in the Hill. Marrow and the other Gene Nation members grew up in this dimension. The Microverse: Originally, many microverses existed within the Marvel Multiverse. The most commonly visited is the one containing the regions known as Sub-Atomica and the Micronauts' Homeworld. The Mojoverse: A dimension where all beings are addicted to gladiator-like television programs. Ruled by Mojo and home to Spiral, Longshot and the X-Babies. The Negative Zone: Mostly uninhabited, it is a universe parallel to Earth's with many similarities. One major difference is all matter in the Negative Zone is negatively charged. Negative Zone Prison Alpha is located here. Also the home of Blastaar and Annihilus. Otherplace: Also known as "Limbo" or "Demonic Limbo", A magical dimension of demons which were historically ruled by Belasco and was primarily featured in the X-Men comics. The Void: A pocket dimension that exists inside Shaman's medicine bag. The Soul Gem: A pocket dimension that exists inside the orange Infinity Gem. External realities Edit Avalon: Also known as Otherworld, this realm is an access point to the entire Marvel Multiverse utilized by the Captain Britain Corps. Also home to the Celtic Gods and King Arthur. The Darkforce Dimension: This dimension also includes, but is not limited to, Spotworld as used by the supervillain the Spot and the Brimstone Dimension as used by the X-Man Nightcrawler. Limbo: Also known as "True Limbo" or "Temporal Limbo", Outside of time historically ruled by Immortus and the location to which Rom the Spaceknight banished the Dire Wraiths. The Panoptichron: Home base of the reality-hopping Exiles, structurally dissimilar but functionally similar to Avalon. Definitions Edit The classification system for alternate realities was devised, in part, by Mark Gruenwald.[3]

Continuity Edit A Universe/continuity is a single reality, such as Earth-616, the mainstream Marvel Universe/Continuity. In Marvel Comics, the concept of a continuity is not the same as "dimension". For example, demons like Mephisto and gods like Odin hail from separate dimensions, but they all nevertheless belong to Universe-616. A continuity should also not be confused with an imprint; for example, while the titles of some imprints, such as Ultimate Marvel, take place in a different continuity, some or all publications in other imprints, such as Epic Comics, MAX, and Marvel UK, take place within the Earth-616 continuity. Note that whether any given specific use of the term "Marvel Universe" refers to the Marvel Multiverse (in general) or to the Earth-616 continuity (in particular) can only be determined by the context of its use.[4]

Multiverse Edit A multiverse is the collection of alternate universes, with a similar nature and a universal hierarchy. The Marvel Multiverse contains the universe that holds Earth-616, most of the What If? universes, as well as the vast number of the alternate Marvel Universe Earths.

The original term and concept were coined by Michael Moorcock for his "Eternal Champion" sequence. The lead characters from Moorcock's work are obviously the inspiration for the Captain Britain Corps.

Megaverse Edit A Megaverse is a collection of alternate multiverses, which do not necessarily need to have similar natures and universal hierarchies. The term was posited in the 21st century edition of the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe.

Omniverse Edit According to the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes, and building on Mark Gruenwald's original definition of the term,[5] the Omniverse consists of all of fiction and reality combined, including all the works that are outside of Marvel's copyright restrictions. As such, there can logically only be one Omniverse, as everything is a part of it.

Known alternate universes Edit As stated above, nearly every imprint, timeline and appearances in other media have its own separate universe. Most of these have been cataloged by Marvel Comics in many publications, being most notable the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes. The numerical designations for these are rarely revealed outside of reference works such as the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes 2005. A.R.M.O.R. and Project Pegasus however seem to possess vast knowledge of other Marvel realities, utilizing the same designations; whether this is simply narrative convenience on behalf of Marvel's authors or an unusual decision by these agencies to utilize an effectively alien catalog method is as yet unstated.

The numeric designations of these alternate universes have been confirmed by Marvel Comics throughout the years and compiled in 2005's Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes, and in Marvel publications since the release of the Handbook. The prevalent method of labeling an unnamed universe is to derive numbers in some way from the publication date of the relevant issue featuring its first appearance. This is, in turn, based on the mistaken belief that "Earth-616" derived its number from the publication date of The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961), although the origin of this term in particular has been under debate. Many official numbers are random or use other numbers as a base, the best example of this is Ultimate Marvel. 1610 is the swapped numbers of 616 with a 0 to differentiate it from the already existing 161. In addition, many universes have also been designated with numbers by fans with various methods for the numbering, such as the birth date of an important Marvel staff member (artist Nelson Ribeiro for the Transformers U.S. Universe, Earth-91274) or the spelling of a name with a touch-tone phone (Animated Silver Surfer Earth, 936652, spells out Zenn-La).

In 2014, during the publication of Spider-Verse, writer Dan Slott posted on Twitter that the numbers that appear in wiki entries and handbooks do not count, only those that are published within "actual" stories do. This was in response to the questions that the different numbers for some Earths appearing in Spider-Verse brought up, such as the Spider-Friends being from Earth-1983 and not the believed designation of Earth-8107.[6] This has created some debate among readers, as some believe that the "Spiders" with numbers that do not match the "original" ones are alternate versions, or if the former numbers should be completely dismissed, despite being official.

In the 2015 Secret Wars series, a confrontation with the Beyonders over the fate of the various alternate versions of the Molecule Man results in the destruction of the Multiverse, triggering various 'incursions' as Earths crash together and destroy each other, the Beyonders' assault culminating in Doctor Doom stealing the power of the remaining Beyonders and bringing the last of the parallel universes together into a single 'Battleworld'. Doom rules this reality for eight years until key heroes and villains from the pre-existing Multiverse are discovered and released by Doctor Strange, who had been acting as Doom's 'sheriff' until the discovery of the survivors gave him an alternative. In the heroes' final assault on Doom's fortress, the Molecule Man, who had been the source of Doom's power, transfers Doom's power to Mister Fantastic when Doom acknowledges that Reed would have done a better job as 'God' than he did. Having restored Earth-616 as it was before the Beyonders' incursions began, Mister Fantastic departs to recreate the multiverse with the company of his restored family.

Main alternate universes History Origin No one in our universe knows how or when the Negative Zone appeared or how old it is. If its aging process is similar to our universe's, it is much older: it has already begun to contract and will eventually implode (a Big Crunch as opposed to a Big Bang). At one time there were several species who had flourishing cultures and made progress in science and the arts. When the contraction began (one estimate puts it at a million years ago), their focus changed to survival. The people of Tyanna, for instance, used spores to terraform other worlds and produced many of the species now known to live there. Other species include the people of Argor, Arthros, Kestor, Krysok, Mantracora, Ootah, and Tarsuu.

The Negative Zone is an alien universe with several characteristics that distinguish it from our own. First, and most important, it is composed entirely of anti-matter. Anyone or anything that moves from one universe to the other must reverse its polarity on a molecular level or be instantly annihilated. Second, it is a mature universe that has already started to contract (ours is still expanding); eventually, it will implode. Third, time passes at a faster rate relative to ours. Fourth, a still unknown factor (possibly lack of water) makes evolution difficult, because much of the Negative Zone is still uninhabited. The best-known characters from the Zone include Annihilus and Blastaar.

Discovery: The FF and the Zone Reed Richards discovered the Negative Zone and built the first portal between the universes.[1] The Fantastic Four have visited there many times.[2]

In the early years, Reed knew little about the people and properties of the Negative Zone. In fact, he treated it as a sort of cosmic trash can, useful only as a place to send intractable foes such as the Super-Adaptoid and Galactus. He abandoned this stratagem after such foes inevitably escaped.

Most of the FF's interaction with the Negative Zone has involved attempts by Annihilus, Blastaar, or both to invade our universe. On an extended trip there, however, they encountered several of the other denizens. They discovered Ootah, a world half-covered by a city, where the control systems had driven out the citizens.[3] Another world, Kestor, imploded when it was drawn into the center of the Zone.[4]

Recently, Reed has returned to the idea of using the Zone as a prison, this time with an actual facility built for the purpose.[5]

During the Secret Invasion, Lyja opened a portal and transferred the entire Baxter Building to the Negative Zone.[6]

A builder described it as a tumor in space, an adrift dying universe that connected to several others [7]

Other Heroes in the Zone For a time, Captain Marvel and Rick Jones shared the same body, with one in our universe and the other in the Negative Zone. The one in our universe changed places voluntarily by striking the Nega-Bands together, or Jones returned involuntarily after a few hours. Captain Marvel freed Jones from this intermittent imprisonment by physically transferring him back to our universe.[8]

Spider-Man has also visited the Negative Zone. He became involved in a rebellion against Blastaar on the world of Tarsuu and acquired the costume now used by Dusk[9].

The realm of Asgard once drifted into the Zone. Odin drove Annihilus back when he tried to invade.[10] Points of Interest Annihilation Area / Crossroads of Infinity As already noted, the Negative Zone is contracting. A black hole (at least, the Zone's version of a black hole) has formed at the center of the universe, made up of all the surplus matter. As it grows, its pull becomes stronger, thus adding more mass to itself--a vicious circle. Some call it the Annihilation Area.

In theory, entering a black hole in our universe and traveling through the singularity will send you to another universe. In the case of the Negative Zone black hole, this theory is fact. For ordinary beings, though, this trip would be fatal. The first hazard is the sheer amount of mass already on its way into the black hole, in the form of gas, rock, and debris. The second is the exponential increase in gravity as one approaches the singularity, which would exert tidal forces on the traveler (see Larry Niven's short story "Neutron Star" for a good explanation). Finally, everything that approaches the singularity is pulled toward and through a single point at faster-than-light speeds, a process that would turn normal matter into a microscopic stream of plasma. The whole process would be like going through an avalanche, an earthquake, and a flood simultaneously, all of them at literally astronomical levels. On the only known successful passage into the singularity, it took the combined forces of Doctor Doom, Annihilus, and Susan Richards to survive. [11]

Inside the singularity, though, is the Crossroads of Infinity, a path that branches off to many other universes. Where you step off the path determines the universe you enter. And, if you stay on the path to the end, you reach the new location of Tyanna.

Distortion Area A direct link between our universe and the Negative Zone would mean the end of both. Reed Richards found (or created) an energy field that serves as an insulator so that travel between the universes is possible. The Distortion Area is an energy sphere in the Zone that is normally invisible (presumably to keep people like Blastaar from noticing it). A beam of the correct wavelength will energize the sphere, making it briefly visible, and open a portal. Passing through the sphere not only takes you to the other universe, it reverses your atomic particles to match the charge of your destination. The experience is disconcerting, to say the least; nausea is the most common complaint, while others may suffer psychological effects such as anxiety or depression. In rare cases someone may enter a fugue state, a sort of waking dream. These mental problems only seem to happen when traveling into, not out of, the Negative Zone, so some property of the Zone itself may be responsible.

Reed recently invented another means of traveling to the Negative Zone--the Fold Space Transceptor--so the Distortion Area may be obsolete.

Time Differential In the space-time continuum of the Negative Zone, time passes at the same rate as it does here: one second per second. When compared to each other, though, the rates differ. While one day passes in our universe, eleven months go by in the Negative Zone. Conversely, while one day passes in the Zone, only 25.7 seconds go by in our universe. This phenomenon offers amazing opportunities for research in such fields as astronomy and cosmology. So far, the difficulties of getting to the Zone and staying alive there have discouraged such research.

Tarsuu Alternate Realities Earth-1610 (Ultimate Marvel) In Ultimate Marvel, the N-Zone is another universe with a corrosive atmosphere and an insectoid villain named Nihil.

Negatory Zone (Earth-9047) 1 Negatory Zone

Earth-9047 (Humorverse) Main article: Negatory Zone In Earth-9047, the Negative Zone is called Negatory Zone. It is a labyrinth that the Fantastical Four went through, trying to avoid dangerous inhabitants including Annihilator and Blastarr.[12]

Earth-135263 (Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes) The Negative Zone appears in Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes (Earth-135263). Seen inhabited by various serpent and insect like creatures. The zone is alleged to be a nexus to all other universes. Unlike it's Earth-616 counterpart the zone was not discovered by Reed Richards, Doom alleges he discovered it years before. Also the Zone does not appear to be composed of anti-matter as Johnny Storm and his girlfriend were seen entering the zone with no protection or preparations and surely would have been annihilated.

Notes The Negative Barrier was an energy field that the insane, evil Inhuman Maximus created around the Inhumans's city of Attilan by reversing his atmo-gun.[13] This seemingly impenetrable energy field was eventually permanently destroyed when Maximus's brother Black Bolt, whose rightful hereditary rule of the Inhumans the evil Maximus has been attempting to usurp for years by trying to overthrow his brother and murder him, unleashed the power of his voice, shattering the field and laying to waste much of the city.[14] See Also Negative Barrier EDIT

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Negative Barrier


Gallery Information-silk Official Name Negative Barrier Origin Information-silk Universe Earth-616 Information-silk Lead Designer Maximus Information-silk Place of Creation Attilan Information-silk Creators Stan Lee, Jack Kirby First Appearance Last Appearance Fantastic Four #48 (March, 1966) (original) Fantastic Four #59 (second barrier was taken down prior to) Quicksilver #4 Contents[hide] History See Also Links and References Footnotes History When the Fantastic Four met the Inhumans, Black Bolt argued with Mister Fantastic, encouraging him to leave peaceably, Maximus sealed the refuge in a "Negative Barrier" after discovering that Inhumans and humans were of the same race. [1]

With his brother insane, and the key to the barrier trapped within Maximus' diseased mind, the Inhumans sought frantically for a way to escape the Negative Barrier. Black Bolt's first attempt was to use his own energy to empower a bomb that would burst it open, but it almost destroyed the entire city before he used his powerful voice to stop it. [2]

Finally, he was forced to expose his secret and again use his destructive voice to demolish the barrier surrounding Attilan, freeing his people. [3]

Attilan remained free of any sort of barriers for years and the hidden city was eventually relocated to the Blue Area of the Moon. [4] However when the city's artificial atmosphere was compromised, the Fantastic Four saved it by shrinking Attilan down in size and recovering it. This occurred during a time that the sorceress known as Morgan le Fay had risen the undersea kingdom of Atlantis from above the ocean floor and formed an alliance with the Inhuman's Genetic Council. [5] They had recovered the shrunken city of Attilan, [6] Although the Fantastic Four, Inhuman royal family, and their allies defeated Le Fay and the rogue Genetics Concil, a new Negative Zone barrier was erected around Attilan, trapping the Terrigen Mist which was unleashed inside, leaving all those still trapped within constantly exposed to the mists. [7] However eventually, Black Bolt regained the Inhuman throne, contained the mists and took down the barrier, although the circumstances behind this are not recorded at this time. [8] History Overview The Dark Dimension is where Dormammu and Umar were both banished to by the Faltine; ruled by Dormammu, who seeks to seize other dimensions to add to his realm. It is home to the Mhuruuks; humanoind extra-dimensional beings naturally adept at manipulating Magic.[citation needed]

Dormammu & Umar The two fugitive Faltine known as Dormammu and Umar were banished to the Dark Dimension, which was inhabited by sorcerers known as the Mhuruuks. Their ruler Olnar dreamed of returning to the days of warfare and conquest. Umar and Dormammu befriended Olnar and played upon these desires. They showed Olnar how to make conquest of other dimensions and bond them with his own. Olnar greedily subjugated several dimensions and added them to his own domain.[citation needed]

In time, the rogue Faltines led Olnar to shatter the barrier between his dimension and that of the Mindless Ones. The Mindless Ones were a horde of soulless brutes that exist simply to destroy anything that lies in their path. The Mhuruuks were beaten back by the onslaught and many were slain, including Olnar. Dormammu and Umar then slew or exiled any wizards that might oppose them. Then they barred the Mindless Ones behind a great mystical barrier.[citation needed]

This battle weakened Umar, and she became subordinate to her brother. Dormammu ascended the throne as regent and ruler of the Dark Dimension. He re-assumed his Faltine form of flame, but Umar chose to remain in her humanoid form.[citation needed]

Alternate Universes Earth-96173 Morgan le Fay Stephen Strange dark dimension (Earth-96173) 1 Unnamed dimension of Morgan le Fay

In Earth-96173, the witch Morgan le Fay was exiled to an unnamed dimension five centuries ago, and she inhabits this weird-looking set along with her sponsor the Nameless One. Only in the twentieth century the barrier between their dimension and Earth was weakened, and the Nameless One sent le Fay to Earth in a three-day quest to murder Sorcerer Supreme Thomas Lindmer and his successor Stephen Strange. Apparently unable to leave the dimension, the Nameless One nonetheless tracked le Fay's progress and chastened her when she failed to succeed. Eventually, le Fay captured Lindmer and imprisoned him in the dimension. Feeling attraction toward Strange, she took him to the dimension and tried to seduce him, but he refused her advances and defeated her. Le Fay was abandoned in the dimension, and even the Nameless One deserted her. However, soon afterward, le Fay was seen again on Earth.

Venus Dee Milo's Dark Dimension The X-Statix member Venus Dee Milo had her own Dark Dimension, linked to her powers, where she had teleported (mistakenly thought killed) them. This place looked quite like a peaceful Heaven, and was seemingly inhabited only by Dee's family.[2]

Marvel Cinematic Universe Dark Dimension from Doctor Strange (film) 001 In Earth-199999, the Dark Dimension is a void within the Multiverse, namely the space between universes. It is highly anomalous and not subject to scientific laws, most notably time - allowing those who draw power from the Dark Dimension to slow down their aging. The ruler of this dimension, Dormammu, feeds on worlds he manages to incorporate into the Dark Dimension. The Masters of the Mystic Arts managed to shield Earth from the Dark Dimension by building three mystical Sanctums, one in New York, one in London and one in Hong Kong.[3] Points of Interest Luminia

Residents Faltine Dormammu Umar Rorkannu Mhuruuks Clea Orini Olnar Val-Larr Mindless Ones Asti the All-Seeing Veritas Paradox Gochhgchaka

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White Hot Room[citation needed]


Gallery Information-silk Official Name White Hot Room[citation needed] Information-silk Aliases Afterlife, The Heart of the Phoenix, The Center/Heart of Creation,[citation needed] White-Hot Room[1] First Appearance — Jean Grey Vol 1 3 Dauterman Variant Textless Marvel Girl What is this?! Where am I? Conversation Tail Classic X-Men Vol 1 8 Back Phoenix Force You're in the White-Hot Room. Conversation Tail Jean Grey Vol 1 3 Dauterman Variant Textless Marvel Girl The White-Hot what now? Conversation Tail Classic X-Men Vol 1 8 Back Phoenix Force It is a nexus between all Phoenix hosts and our eternal flame. A place of rest and contemplation. Home to every being with whom I've merged. Every Phoenix host leaves a piece of itself here with me. Conversation Tail Contents[hide] History Residents Notes Trivia See Also Links and References Footnotes History The White Hot Room is a realm that serves both as the afterlife and a base of operations for the Phoenix. The White Hot Room also resides in the M'Krann Crystal, which is a nexus of realities and contains a Neutron galaxy.[citation needed]

When Jean Grey first bonded with the Phoenix and later sought to heal the M'Krann Crystal she found a white city inside. She felt as though she were connected to it and was meant to heal it. [citation needed]

Later, when Jean Grey appeared in the afterlife and met Death and his towers, Death described the realm as "the alpha and the omega, the beginning and end of all-- where the physical universe merges with the domains of the spirit and imagination." When beings die they go inside Death's towers, but the Phoenix exists outside of the towers to do her work. During the second encounter with Death and the afterlife, Death explains to Jean that his towers are compartmentalized and that all beings go there to experience their own version of the afterlife.[3]

When Quentin Quire briefly ascended to the White Hot Room as he was near death, he could hear and understand the thoughts of everyone on Earth, and he realized that he had met his parents there before he had been born.[citation needed]

Jean Grey would later comment that we are all in the White Hot Room waiting for ourselves to arrive. When Jean went to the White Hot Room as The White Phoenix of the Crown to disinfect Sublime, the Phoenix Consciousness explained that the White Hot Room is inside the M'Krann Crystal. It is a hospital to the universe and where Phoenix Work is done. Jean met various Phoenix hosts in the White Hot Room.[citation needed]

The White Hot Room is also where a Phoenix-like Jean Grey may go if they do not instantaneously resurrect when killed, and do Phoenix Work while they await to incubate and be reborn anew from a Phoenix Egg.[citation needed]

Inside the White Hot Room is the Crown. Several times Jean spoke of being in the Crown, and the Phoenix Consciousness labeled her a White Phoenix of the Crown. However, it has yet to be explored as to what the Crown actually is.[citation needed]

During the House of M event, Psylocke and Rachel Summers would be pulled into the White Hot Room by a holoemphatic crystal, that Jean Grey had left for Rachel, to temporarily protect them from the effects of Scarlet Witch's powers. Rachel refers to the White Hot Room as the Heart of the Phoenix. In the White Hot Room, Psylocke encounters alternate universe versions of herself, while Rachel only encounters herself in different time periods of her life.[citation needed]

In recent times Jean Grey and the Phoenix were pulled from the White Hot Room and separated and shattered. Upon coming back together, Jean has faded away to the White Hot Room as White Phoenix to collect the rest of the missing pieces of the Phoenix. She made contact with Cyclops when he became the Dark Phoenix, and tried to help him to control the Phoenix Force.[citation needed]

The White Hot Room has recently been referenced by the former Avenger Sentry (now a Horsemen of Death), who stated that the Void and Exitar the Executioner are both currently residing in the realm.[4][5] Residents Jean Grey Phoenix Force Jean was seen taking her family into the White Hot Room in End of Greys, making them presumable residents. Other past and future host that are not named. The Void Exitar the Executioner Notes Jean Grey seemingly ushered her family into the White Hot Room after they were slaughtered by the Shi'ar Death Commandos.[citation needed] Wolverine had a near death experience in which he had a vision of Jean dressed in a white gown bathed in white light. Jean comments that they are near the entrance to the afterlife, and that she had been there so many times that she has left a piece of herself at the door.[citation needed] In the X-Men: The End miniseries, the Stepford Cuckoos refer to Jean as Phoenix as living in the Center of Creation.[citation needed] Trivia The existence of this location is known to Jean Grey,[3] Quentin Quire,[citation needed] Phoenix Corps,[citation needed] Death,[citation needed] Psylocke,[citation needed] and Rachel Summers,[citation needed] Cyclops[citation needed] and the Sentry.[citation needed] See Also Appearances of White Hot Room Minor Appearances of White Hot Room Media White Hot Room was Mentioned in Location Gallery: White Hot Room Images related to White Hot Room

Links and References X-Men #108 Classic X-Men #43 X-Men Forever #3 New X-Men #138 New X-Men #151-154 X-Men Phoenix Endsong #1-5 Footnotes ↑ Jean Grey #11 ↑ X-Men Phoenix Endsong #5 ↑ 3.0 3.1 Classic X-Men #43 ↑ Uncanny Avengers #11 ↑ Uncanny Avengers #22 Categories: Locations Jean Grey (Earth-TRN240)/Quotes Phoenix Force (Earth-616)/Quotes Dimensions Heaven Realm of Death Add category

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Hell


Gallery Information-silk Official Name Hell Information-silk Aliases Arallu,[1] Hades,[citation needed] Heck,[2] Limbo,[citation needed] Netherworld,[3] The Pit[4][5][6] Information-silkCreators George Kapitan, Harry Sahle First Appearance Mystic Comics #4 (August, 1940) Quote1 Every night the foulest creatures imaginable hound me from one end of the inferno to the other! I ride through fire and blades and swamps of rotting flesh, I immerse myself in caverns filled with blood like veins-but I can't shake them off! And every night they tear me to shreds! Quote2 -- Ghost Rider src

Contents[hide] Overview History 20th Century Points of Interest Trivia See Also Links and References Footnotes Overview A common name for the underworld domains of the various demons who have referred to themselves as Satan. If they are separate from each other or different areas of a much larger dimensional plane has not been clearly explained, nor can be confirmed due to the deceitful nature of the realm(s)' various rulers. Many beings claim to be the ruler of hell. These beings have all been referred to as Hell-Lords and have often worked with, or against each other and have referred to themselves and/or posed as the Biblical Satan at one point or another. These rulers have included:

Daimon Hellstrom Lucifer Marduk Kurios Mephisto Satannish Thog

The purpose of this article is to identify activities that have occurred in these various interrelated realms.

History 20th Century One of the most active demons claiming to be Satan during the 20th Century was the demon that empowered the Black Widow in 1928. This Satan had the Black Widow bring him the souls of the wicked and those who violated deals that he had made of them. The first of these was criminal Lester Maddox, who killed the Black Widow's sister Debbie.[7] Accounts of other souls that the Black Widow has brought to this hell-realm included James Wagler,[8] Garvey Lang,[9] and war profiteers Lewis and Sykes.[10] The Black Widow was also sent to Germany during World War II to collect the souls of Nazi soldiers due to the fact that their leader Adolf Hitler had apparently violated some pact that he had made with the Black Widow's master.[11]

One region of Hell was briefly run like an Earth-style business in 1942. Dubbed "Hades Inc." it was run by a demon calling himself Lucifer Satan (or L.S. for short). They claimed to have been responsible for Hitler's rise to power. They also sent one of their agents to the town of Arbor City in the United States and as local celebrity Victor Risling, entered into politics in order to spread his message of hate and prejudice. Risling was defeated and exposed by the other-dimensional Vision.[12] In 1943, a demon calling himself Satan and his mistress claimed that they were involved in Hitler's rise to power. Unimpressed with the progress Hitler was making during the war they decided to replace him with Attila the Hun. This plot was foiled by the Destroyer.[13]

Following his death, a Red Skull impersonator found his soul in an unspecified Hell Realm ruled by a demon calling himself Satan. He tricked this Satan to pull the soul of Captain America to Hell. There both men battled for their freedom, with Captain America ultimately winning his freedom by defeating the Red Skull.[14] Points of Interest Styx River Some invocations and mentions presents Hell as having seven circles.[15][16][17] The Ninth Circle of Hell is allegedly for the traitors.[18] Another invocation mention the "ten unholy levels of Hell".[19]

In Hyboria, invocations mentioned seven[20] or nine Hells.[21] Conan once shouted about "seven Hyborian Hells".[22] One demon was known as Azthamur of the Hundred Hells.[23] Another invocation mentions the "Nine Seas of Hell".[24]

In Earth-85133, there's at least nine circle, with Belathauzer as the arch-lord of the Ninth Circle. Omniverse EDIT

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Omniverse

Gallery Information-silk Official Reality Number Unknown Information-silk Status Existing First Appearance — Contents[hide] History Related definitions Continuity Multiverse Megaverse Notes Links Footnotes

History The Omniverse is the collection of every single universe, multiverse, megaverse, dimension (alternate or pocket) and realm. This includes not only Marvel Comics, but also DC Comics, Image, Dark Horse, Archie, Harvey, Shueisha, Boom Studios, Rebellion, Dynamite, IDW, Graphic India, Derby Pop, Vertigo, Oni Press, Udon, Valiant, and every universe ever mentioned or seen (and an infinite amount never mentioned or seen) including our own world. Everything is in the Omniverse, and there is only one Omniverse. According to the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes, "It includes every single literary, television show, movie, urban legend, universe, realm, etc. ever. It includes everyone from Popeye to Rocky Balboa to Ronald Reagan to Romeo and Juliet to Luke Skywalker to Snoopy to Jay and Silent Bob, etc." This includes universes outside of American and European western comics, such as Dragon Ball, Naruto, Bleach, One Piece, Ghost in the Shell and etc. eastern comic book media. The Omniverse is EVERY reality, including those published by all other companies. Even fan-fictions, cancelled works, mere fantasies, wishes of thoughts created by people, future comic book publishing companies and fictional universes yet to be published are considered part of the Omniverse; simply put, the Omniverse is every version of reality and existence imaginable.

Related definitions The classification system for alternate realities was devised, in part, by Mark Gruenwald.

Continuity A Universe/continuity is a single reality, such as Earth-616, the mainstream Marvel Universe/Continuity. In Marvel Comics, the concept of a continuity is not the same as "dimension" or "galaxy"; for example, characters like Mephisto and Dormammu hail from alternate dimensions and the Celestials from another galaxy, but they all nevertheless belong to Universe-616. A continuity should also not be confused with an imprint; for example, while the titles of some imprints, such as Ultimate Marvel, take place in a different continuity, some or all publications in other imprints, such as Epic Comics, MAX, and Marvel UK, take place within the Earth-616 continuity. Note that in context the Marvel Universe is sometimes used to refer to the Marvel Multiverse, and sometimes used to refer to the Earth-616 continuity.

Multiverse A Multiverse is a collection of alternate universes, with a similar nature and a universal hierarchy. The Marvel multiverse contains Earth-616 and most of the What If? universes, as well as the vast number of alternate Marvel Universe Earths.

The original term and concept were coined by Michael Moorcock for his "Eternal Champion" sequence. The lead characters from Moorcock's work are obviously the inspiration for the Captain Britain Corps.

Megaverse The Megaverse is a structure present between Multiverse and Omniverse which links realities more closely associated to the mainstream Multiverse, and more distant realities, such as the Shadowline.[1]

There are certain universes outside of the Marvel multiverse that are collected inside their own multiverses, which then form groups of multiverses.[citation needed] The 21st century edition of the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe posits the term Megaverse (although Marvel does not actually endorse the use of this term because of trademark issues) as the name for this larger grouping; because there is always the chance that some future publications will increase the interactions between different Multiverses, this is a fluid definition. Notes According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, an Omniverse is simply "a universe that is spatiotemporally four-dimensional".[2] Kevin Brashear, son of the Blue Marvel, is noted as being the first human being to exit and later re-enter the Omniverse in Captain America and the Mighty Avengers #7. How that could even be possible as the Omniverse has been described as encompassing everything imaginable has not been explained. It should be noted, though, that Al Ewing (the writer of Captain America and the Mighty Avengers), like many writers before him, uses Omniverse as a synonym to Multiverse.[3] Dimension Brimstone Dimension Also known as a realm, a dimension is a portion of reality containing space, matter and energy which is separated from others by some physical difference in these elements. The universe is the dimension which the planet Earth shares with other planets, stars and galaxies. "Earth-like dimensions" possess a a similar markup, physical properties and laws of physics as the Earth's dimension. Alien dimensions differ in physical properties and laws than Earth's dimension. Magic dimensions are primarily governed by magic.

Most prominent example of dimensions are the Ten Realms, a set of ten different worlds connected by the energy field known as Yggdrasill.

Known Dimensions

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Information-silk Multiverse


Gallery Information-silk Official Reality Number Unknown Information-silk Aliases Multi-Verse[1] Information-silk Status Existing Information-silk Creators Bill Everett First Appearance Motion Picture Funnies Weekly #1 (April, 1939) Contents[hide] History Overview Multiversal Cycle Protectors of the Multiverse X-Termination Age of Ultron Incursions and the Eighth Cosmos Eternity War "Universe" meaning Dimension vs. Universe Universe Listing Official Universes Pocket Dimensions: Universes Within Universes Future Timelines Near Future Far Future The End of Time Bibliography Links Footnotes

History Quote1 How many worlds have you been to? I've seen multitudes. They're all beautiful... and different. Quote2 -- Spider-UK src

Overview The Multiverse is the collection of alternate universes which share a universal hierarchy; it is a subsection of the larger Omniverse, the collection of all alternate universes. A large variety of these universes were originated as forms of divergence from other realities, where an event with different possible outcomes gives rise to different universes, one for each outcome. Some can seem to be taking place in the past or future due to differences in how time passes in each universe. Often, new universes and dimensions are born due to time traveling. Eternity once stated that there are almost infinite aspects of itself, thus establishing the Marvel's positioning then.[2] Afterward the Beyonder estimated there is a "seemingly endless number of dimensions" to thereafter explore the entire Multiverse and its "myriad planes."[3] The Crossroads also leads to an infinite number of dimensions.[4] In addition, the Molecule Man, who was almost omniscient,[5] has also postulated that there are infinite parallel dimensions to Earth's universe that together comprise the Multiverse.[6] Finally, it was later stated in the Book of the Vishanti, which details the Marvel cosmology, that there is "literally a transfinite number, that is, a number greater than infinity" of universes in the Multiverse.[7] There is also a transfinite number of Multiverses.[8] The Multiverse was further described as boundless by the Captain Universe.[9]

Multiversal Cycle In the beginning, there was only one universe: the First Firmament. A war between its creations, the Aspirants and the Celestials, shattered the First Firmament into pieces, and from these pieces were born countless universes, thus forming the Second Cosmos and First Multiverse. As these new universes coalesced, a new, collective being was formed. Each iteration of the Multiverse has gone through a different instance of renewal, which constitutes in the destruction and re-creation of everything there is starting from zero, with each renewal prompting the Multiverse to evolve further.[10][11]

The seventh iteration of the Multiverse was destroyed as a consequence of the phenomena known as incursions,[12] and was eventually reborn as the eighth when Mister Fantastic acquired the power of the Beyonders, which was previously held by Doctor Doom. Richards' intervention caused the eighth incarnation to be a direct continuation of the seventh. Instead of starting from scratch, most of the destroyed universes were re-created, continuing their existence almost as if nothing had happened.[13]

Protectors of the Multiverse The Multiverse was originally categorized and protected by Merlyn, who established the Captain Britain Corps. Most realities have a Captain Britain designated to protect its version of the British Isles and in extension the reality, thanks to an omniversal dimensional nexus situated in a tower on the shores of the United Kingdom. Individual members of the Corps draw their power from this nexus thanks to Merlyn's magic and science.[14]

There are other beings and groups dealing with protecting the Multiverse, for example the Time Variance Authority,[15] or the Exiles.[16]

New realities are constantly created and often involves time traveling characters as time travel in Marvel Comics always creates divergent realities, and it is typically not possible to alter time or travel back to your own past.[17]

X-Termination The rift first became known on Earth-13812 in the head of the Sphinx. Lord Xavier, the Witch King, Nazi Xavier, and Xavier Head began sacrificing civilians to an interdimensional rift to gain power. The transdimensional X-Men were were able to rescue their Xavier and narrowly defeated Lord Xavier and Nazi Xavier. Unfortunately, the X-Men did not act quickly enough to save that world, and were forced to make an interdimensional jump, leaving that reality and all its citizens being consumed by the Exterminators vortex.[18]

Meanwhile on Earth-616, AOA Nightcrawler and Dark Beast used the Dreaming Celestial to create a portal to New Apocalypse. Unfortunately, this portal opened the rift between realities wide enough for the Exterminators to pass over to Earth-295.[19]

When the Exterminators emerged, they were greeted by the X-Men, the transdimensional X-Men, and the X-Terminated.[19][20]

One of the Exterminators departed to Earth-616 where he drained the Dreaming Celestial while the other two Exterminators remained on Earth-295, one feeding off the rift and the other seeking out the power of Apocalypse in the Death Seed.[21]

Age of Ultron After Wolverine traveled back in time numerous times to prevent the rise of power of the evil artificial intelligence known as Ultron, the space-time continuum was broken, causing a multiversal massive shockwave to echo through time and space as reality seeming to shatter before being pulled back together. A "multiversal chaos" was unleashed, where numerous beings from other realities were transported to other universes through the tears of reality.[22]

Incursions (Multiverse) New AvengersVol 3 2 001 Mechanics of incursions

Incursions and the Eighth Cosmos Due to the result of a phenomena paradoxial in nature known as incursions which resulted from the early destruction of a reality causing a contraction in the Multiverse,[23] every universe in existance began to experience regular collisions one with another, with their respective planets Earth acting as the focal point. Unless the impact was averted by the destruction of either of the two colliding Earths, both intersecting realities would be destroyed when the two planets made contact.[24]

While numerous different beings and groups of people from across numerous universes attempted to avert the death of everything, it all eventually came down to the final incursion between the last two surviving universes, Earth-616 and Earth-1610, which were subsequently destroyed. Only a handful of inhabitants from each universe outlived their realities, aboard life rafts that kept them in suspended animation. Among them were the Reed Richards of each universe, Mister Fantastic and the Maker.[25]

After stealing the power from the Beyonders, powerful beings that existed outside what once was the Multiverse, with the help of the Molecule Man, Doctor Doom managed to salvage the remnants of several destroyed universes, merging them into Battleworld. Doom's eight-year reign as Battleworld's ruler came to an end when the discovery of the two life rafts caused bedlam. During a confrontation between Doctor Doom and Mister Fantastic, the Molecule Man transferred Doom's power to Reed, destroying Battleworld in the process. With the power he had received, Mister Fantastic began to restore the Multiverse, universe by universe, with the help of his revived family. This chain of events is what caused the creation of the Eighth Cosmos.[26]

Eternity War Still resentful by the existence of multiple realities, the First Firmament decided to attack the current embodiment of the Multiverse, Eternity. Taking advantage of Eternity's weakened state caused by its most recent rebirth, the First Firmament bound it in chains, and sent its Aspirants to destroy it from the inside out.[11]

In an attempt to help strengthen Eternity, the Maker harvested the essence of the Aspirants and used the High Evolutionary's technology to disrupt and bring down the Superflow, the network that separated realities from one another, successfully merging every universe within Eternity into one. The Maker also took advantage of this opportunity to rewrite the laws of the Multiverse to bring back to life the original Ultimates from his defunct home universe.[27] Even though the process strengthened Eternity in the beginning and allowed it to break free from the First Firmament's grasp, it soon proved to be counterproductive. Eternity began to deteriorate, facilitating the First Firmament's consumption of it. Because of this, Galactus sent his own Ultimates to stop the Maker.

After Spectrum and the High Evolutionary killed the Maker's then-current body, both teams of Ultimates worked together to reverse the damage caused to the Superflow. Using the nanites from his armor in the High Evolutionary's technology, which had been advanced by the Maker beyond its creator's understanding, Iron Man was capable of interacting with it. Spectrum subsequently used her powers to link together the minds of both teams of Ultimates, allowing their combined brain power to operate the machine, and restore the Multiverse to its normal state.

Galactus and his Eternity Watch subsequently entered Eternity and defeated the Aspirants, freeing Eternity from their detrimental influence. Full of vigor once again, Eternity managed to confront the First Firmament, summoning the previous embodiements of past cosmoses to his aid. This army of past cosmoses imprisoned the First Firmament, and took it away to another plane of existence in order to heal it.[28]

"Universe" meaning The word "universe" has also been used by Yahweh from Earth-616 to describe the universe (Earth-616) along with all its multiple realities, including Duckworld. He also confirmed that the Universe comprised the Multiverse and the metaversal spaces between the different realities.

Yahweh also stated that they were other universes, and that his job was "a contribution to a collective work called "Existence.".[29]

Dimension vs. Universe A dimension is described as "universe or realm containing space, time, matter, and energy".[30] The realms where gods and demons reside are parallel dimensions, rather than being adjacent realities. They are situated beyond the main universes.[7] The Beyonder once classified parallel dimensions such as the Microverse within the same "many-layered multiverse" of gods and demons.[3] The realms are pocket-dimensions endowed with limited size,[7][30] while the universes within the multiverse don't have boundaries and are virtually infinite.[31]

Universe Listing A list of alternate universes with known numerical designations resides below. Many other alternates have been visited or explored, but are yet to be designated.

Official Universes These universe numbers have actually been printed in an official Marvel publication. For other, unprinted universes, see "Unofficial Universes" below.

Multiverse/Universe Listing

Pocket Dimensions: Universes Within Universes Earth-311 (Marvel 1602): Originating out of a Neil Gaiman story; the Age of Marvels began during Queen Elizabeth's reign. Elizabethan versions of many Marvel heroes banded together. The sequel is 1602: New World. Note: Within the pages of 1602, it is unambiguously affirmed that this universe is the same Earth-616 that the normal Marvel titles are based within. However, when events transpire at the end of the series, the 1602-verse lives on in Uatu's pocket dimension as Earth-311.[32] Limbo: The name of three singular dimensions in the Marvel Universe. The Encroachiverses: A succession of universes believed disappointments by extremely powerful, unnamed beings; including the Baloney-verse, the Don't-Worry-Be-Happy-verse, the 976-verse, the Dimension of Suicide, the Noriega-verse, the Trashi-verse, the Narcissi-verse. the Media-verse, the Puppet-verse, and the Insipiverse.[33] The splinter of time that was Earth-13584 qualifies as a pocket dimension.[34] The Microverse: Once believed to be a universe within the universe, the Microverse is actually a parallel reality.[35][30] There are many microverses,[36] or at least there were at one time. The most commonly visited are Sub-Atomica[37] and also the Micronauts' Homeworld.[38] Reportedly, a Crisis-event once caused all the Microverses to collapse in one themselves to become a single Microverse, although reports of this event come second-hand.[39] Counter-Earth (Heroes Reborn): Originally a pocket dimension, where Franklin Richards kept some of the heroes after the events surrounding the appearance of Onslaught, this version of Earth now resides in the Earth-616 universe, on the opposite side of the sun.[40] The Magick Universe, home to Lord Chaos, Master Order, and the In-Betweener.[41] Future Timelines The future of the Marvel Universe is not set in stone; not all futures listed below are possible futures. Some are thought to have been prevented, but may have only been delayed.

Near Future The near-future timeline of MC2 is home to numerous next-generation superheroes, most notably Spider-Girl and the next generation of Avengers.[citation needed]

The dark future of Days of Future Past may have been prevented by the X-Men. In this timeline, mutants are hunted down and either killed or imprisoned by the Sentinels who control the world's governments. Rachel Summers, Nimrod and Ahab have all traveled from here to the present.

Earth-1191, the future of Bishop, Shard and the XSE may be a later period in the same timeline.[citation needed]

The future timeline of Earth X revolves around the Marvel Universe's cosmology. However, Earth X is not a possible future of the main Marvel Universe, given that revelations about the history of Earth X that are incompatible with the known history of Earth-616.[citation needed]

In Earth-691, Martian Masters conquer the Earth in a redux of The War of the Worlds. Jonathan Raven (Earth-691) and his Freemen are among the few revolutionaries who are able to resist the alien overlords. In one alternate timeline, Killraven is the leader of his timeline's team of Avengers; another alternate version was seen in Alan Davis's Killraven miniseries.[citation needed]

The year 2020 is home to several heroes and villains, most notably Iron Man 2020. Machine Man and Sunset Bain are known to have future counterparts in this year. The bounty hunter Death's Head visited here at least twice (and died here on the last visit), and his successor Death's Head II (Minion) was created here and returned to this timeline on several occasions. Nikki Doyle, the virtual-reality adventurer called Wild Thing, is also a native of 2020.[citation needed]

The space faring superhero Star-Lord hails from a future timeline, but has, through unknown circumstances, come to reside in the present, where he fought alongside Thanos against the Maker in the cosmic prison called the Kyln.[citation needed]

Far Future The Marvel 2099 series tell the exploits of the Marvel Universe in the year 2099, including Spider-Man 2099, Doom 2099, and the X-Men 2099. Marvel 2099 has its heroes in a climate of corporate-dominated dystopia. An alternate version of this timeline was seen in the Marvel Knights 2099 series of one-shots; a villain from this time traveled to the past and was defeated by a group of heroes from the present, who remained in this future timeline after preventing their own timeline from occurring.

The Spider-Man of the year 2500 met both the modern Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2099, but was later killed by the Hobgoblin from 2211.

The 30th century is the home of the Guardians of the Galaxy and their allies, the Galactic Guardians. The Guardians are the future of the same timeline that Killraven inhabits. The starship Sol III and its crew (from Cyberspace 3000) are also native of the time of the Guardians.

The 30th century of the parallel timeline of Other-Earth is the home of Kang the Conqueror, whose divergent counterparts include Immortus and Iron Lad; he uses the 40th century as his home base.

Cable and his clone Stryfe hail from the future world that was ruled by Apocalypse until he was killed by the time-travelling Cyclops and Phoenix. Cable was raised here by the Askani, who were led by this timeline's version of his time-displaced half-sister, Rachel Summers.

The year 8192 is home to the time-travelling robot bounty hunter Death's Head and the gladiators-turned-mercenaries called Dragon's Claws.

The End of Time Near the end of time, the last member of the timeline-managing Time Variance Authority oversees the birth of three entities named Ast, Vort, and Zanth; these three become either the Time-Keepers or the Time-Twisters in one of the two possible remaining futures. The Time-Keepers are the employers of Immortus, and use him to eliminate timelines that could lead to the creation of the Time-Twisters. During the Destiny War, Kang the Conqueror killed the Time-Keepers and diverged from Immortus, creating a new future for himself in which he does not become Immortus.[citation needed]

Wolverine and Jubilee of the X-Men were once transported to the end of the universe (the "Big Crunch") by the time-dancer Spiraland her employer Mojo. All four returned to their own time after the battle.[citation needed]Galactus battles the Watcher who witnessed his "birth". The two of them battle over a millennia and the universe basically dies around them. Stars burn out and opposed to there being a "big crunch" entropy wins over all. As the universe verges on flickering out of existence, Galactus draws his last shreds of energy, giving him just enough of an edge to battle the rogue Watcher. Galactus and Nova, his herald, are left in an empty void. Galactus comes to the realization what he's been doing for billions of years. He cracks his armor and the energy he absorbed spews out of him. Galactus becomes the Big Bang of the next universe. Nova survives and becomes the "Galactus" of the next universe and the cycle continues.[42]

Mister Immortal, Craig Hollis of the Great Lakes Avengers, is destined to be the only true immortal in existence and will learn the last secret of the universe at the last moments of the universe.[43]

Bibliography Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes 2005 X-Men: Millennial Visions #2000 Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A-Z (Hardcover) Vol. 2-5 2005's Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe: Alternate Universes compiles all of the then-known universes in a Earth-number format. Supposedly, the method of delineating a Universe's number is to derive the numbers from the publication date of the issue where the universe first appeared. First being the two-digit year followed by the number of the month. For instance, it is commonly and erroneously thought that "Earth-616" was named after the publication date of Fantastic Four #1, 61 from its year of publication and 6 from June.[44] Links Characters from Multiverse Other things related to Multiverse Multiverse's Appearances Multiverse's Minor Appearances Media Multiverse was Mentioned in Images from Multiverse Reality Gallery: Multiverse Appendix to The Marvel Universe Alternate Universes Page

Footnotes ↑ Spider-Verse Team-Up #2 ↑ What If? #43 ↑ 3.0 3.1 Incredible Hulk #312 ↑ Incredible Hulk #305 ↑ Secret Wars II #7 ↑ Secret Wars II #8 ↑ 7.0 7.1 7.2 Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme #21 ↑ Cable #94 ↑ Fantastic Four Annual #2001 ↑ Ultimates Vol 2 #1 ↑ 11.0 11.1 Ultimates 2 Vol 2 #6 ↑ Secret Wars #7 ↑ Secret Wars #9 ↑ Excalibur #50 ↑ Thor #371 ↑ Exiles #1 ↑ Marvel Two-In-One #50 ↑ X-Treme X-Men Vol 2 #12 ↑ 19.0 19.1 X-Termination #1 ↑ Astonishing X-Men Vol 3 #60 ↑ Age of Apocalypse #14 ↑ Age of Ultron #10 ↑ New Avengers Vol 3 #33 ↑ New Avengers Vol 3 #2 ↑ Secret Wars #1 ↑ Secret Wars #2-9 ↑ Ultimates 2 Vol 2 #9 ↑ Ultimates 2 #100 ↑ Howard the Duck Vol 3 #6 ↑ 30.0 30.1 30.2 Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A-Z #1 ↑ Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A-Z #2 ↑ Marvel 1602 #6 ↑ Sensational She-Hulk #13 ↑ Dark Avengers #190 ↑ Fantastic Four #282 ↑ What If? #23 ↑ Fantastic Four #16 ↑ Micronauts #1 ↑ Captain Marvel Vol 4 #6 ↑ Heroes Reborn: The Return #1-4 ↑ Silver Surfer Vol 3 #15-16 ↑ Epic Illustrated #26 ↑ G.L.A. #4 ↑ Statement by Stuart Vandal, Jun 17, 2005. Original thread preserved on comixfan.net, http://www.cxpulp.com/showthread.php?7263-The-Official-Handbooks-General-Q-amp-A-Thread

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Phantom Zone. The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, commonly in association with stories featuring Superman. It first appeared in Adventure Comics #283 (April 1961), and was created by Robert Bernstein and George Papp.[1] It was frequently used in the Superman comics before the continuity was rebooted in the 1980s, after Crisis on Infinite Earths, and has appeared occasionally since.

Phantom Zone Phantom Zone.jpg Superman being trapped in the Phantom Zone as seen on the cover of Superman vol. 5 #2 (August 2018). Art by Ivan Reis. First appearance Adventure Comics #283 (April 1961) Publisher DC Comics Contents Fictional history Edit Pre-Crisis Edit The Phantom Zone was a "pocket universe" discovered by Jor-El that existed outside the space-time continuum; used on the planet Krypton as a humane method of imprisoning criminals. Previously, criminals were punished by being sealed into capsules and rocketed into orbit in suspended animation with crystals attached to their foreheads to slowly erase their criminal tendencies; Klax-Ar was one criminal who received this punishment but escaped. Gra-Mo was the last to suffer the punishment, for it was then abolished in favor of the Zone.

The inmates of the Phantom Zone reside in a ghost-like state of existence from which they can observe, but cannot interact with, the regular universe. Inmates do not age or require sustenance in the Phantom Zone; furthermore, they are telepathic and mutually insubstantial. As such, they were able to survive the destruction of Krypton and focus their attention on Earth, as most of the surviving Kryptonians now reside there. Most have a particular grudge against Superman because his father created the method of their damnation, and was often the prosecutor at their trials. When they manage to escape, they usually engage in random destruction, particularly easy for them since, on Earth, each has the same powers as Superman. Nevertheless, Superman periodically released Phantom Zone prisoners whose original sentences had been completed, and most of these went to live in the bottle city of Kandor.

The sole inmate of the Phantom Zone who was not placed there as punishment for a crime is Mon-El, a Daxamite who fell victim to lead poisoning. Superboy was forced to cast him into the Phantom Zone to keep him alive, where he remained until the time of the Legion of Super-Heroes when Brainiac 5 created a medication that allowed him to leave safely.

Green Lantern Guy Gardner once experienced an extended and tortuous stay after an explosion of a Green Lantern Power Battery sent him there, until rescued by Superman and Green Lantern Hal Jordan, who had believed him to be dead all that time.

Phantom Girl can enter or leave the Phantom Zone as she pleases, and once did so to interrogate the prisoners about Jor-El.[2]

Superman develops communications equipment for the Phantom Zone, like the Zone-o-Phone, and refinements to the projector. In addition, the city of Kandor uses the Phantom Zone regularly, with parole hearings sometimes chaired by Superman. However, since the departure of Kandor, that is, outside of Mon-El, most of the inhabitants were confined to lifers and generally not inclined to making conversation with their jailer. As for Superman himself, as much as he appreciates how the Zone is necessary to contain its Kryptonian inmates and shelter Mon-El, he apparently privately harbors concerns about the justness of its penal use. This is illustrated in the acclaimed story, "For the Man Who Has Everything" by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, where Clark is ensnared in a fantasy illusion created by an alien parasitical plant called a Black Mercy. As his subconscious resists the illusion of a peaceful life on Krypton, among the first signs of its degeneration is the sight of his cousin, Kara Zor-El, hospitalized after being attacked by an anti-Phantom Zone militant who left literature protesting that the Phantom Zone is a method of torture.

In the Steve Gerber miniseries The Phantom Zone (January–April 1982), it is revealed that the Zone not only has a breach through which other inmates had escaped, but were never heard from again. The imprisoned Superman and Quex-Ul use this method and travel through several dimensional "layers" seeking the exit into the physical universe. They finally encounter a Kryptonian wizard named Thul-Kar, who tells them he believed Jor-El's prophecy of Krypton's doom and entered the Phantom Zone through magic. Using the same breach, he discovered the truth about the Phantom Zone: all its levels are manifestations of the consciousness of a sentient universe called Aethyr. The Zone itself is an interface between the Earth-One dimension and Aethyr's mind, the outer layer representing its ability for abstract thought; the Zone is basically Aethyr's capacity to imagine other possibilities of existence. Only by entering Aethyr's core realm can they escape back to Earth, which is dangerous since any being who tries risks either being destroyed or merging with Aethyr's essence.[3] While Quex-Ul is killed by Aethyr, Superman manages to make his way out of the Phantom Zone and return to Earth.[4]

Mister Mxyzptlk is later possessed by Aethyr. During Superman's fight with the possessed Mr. Mxyzpltk-Aethyr empties the Phantom Zone of its inhabitants but is absorbed into Aethyr itself. As the Phantom Zone villains head to Earth to conquer it, Thul-Kar and Nam-Ek are also absorbed into Aethyr. Superman awakes and sees that the Phantom Zone villains are wreaking havoc on Earth, causing destruction to the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. and demanding Superman come out and fight them. Superman battles the Phantom Zone villains in Washington. While fighting Faora Hu-Ul, he witnesses her disappearing as she is absorbed into Aethyr. Mister Mxyzpltk reveals that his strong personality has taken over Aethyr and he absorbs all the rest of the Phantom Zone inhabitants into himself. Mxyzpltk-Aethyr leaves, intending to next take over the Fifth Dimension, and Superman is left to put out the fires in Washington and then rid Metropolis of Kryptonite.[5] Post-Crisis Edit

Phantom Zone criminals pictured from left to right: Ursa, General Zod, and Non. Art by Gary Frank and Jonathan Sibal. In the Post-Crisis DC Universe, the Phantom Zone first appears after Superman returns from space with a Kryptonian artifact called the Eradicator. This device, created by his Kryptonian ancestor Kem-L, attempts to recreate Krypton on Earth, building the Fortress of Solitude; the extradimensional space in which the Eradicator finds the Kryptonian materials necessary is called the Phantom Zone.[6][7] A Phantom Zone Projector is part of Superman's current Fortress. It has been used to access the Bottle City of Kandor and to trap villains such as the White Martians.

The Phantom Zone has been independently discovered by various characters where it is called the "Buffer Zone" by the Bgztlians, the "Still Zone" by the White Martians, the "Stasis Zone" by Loophole, the "Ghost Zone" by Prometheus, and the "Honeycomb" by the first Queen Bee. In Post-Crisis/Post-Zero Hour continuity, it was Loophole's "Stasis Zone" technology that exiled Mon-El, known in the new continuity as Valor/M'Onel, into the Phantom Zone for a thousand years.

Superman fashions the Phantom Zone technology into an arrow projectile which upon striking a victim will project them into the Phantom Zone. Roy Harper, the original Speedy, steals this arrow from Superman when the original Teen Titans are invited for a visit many years ago. Roy, however, never uses the arrow and passes it on to his replacement, Mia Dearden, who uses the arrow during the events of Infinite Crisis on Superboy-Prime. Unfortunately, he is too strong for even the Phantom Zone arrow, and manages to break out.

At one point, the White Martians imprison Batman in the Phantom Zone and take his identity as Bruce Wayne.

Batman devises a measure made after Superman recovers from his first battle with Doomsday, that, when the Justice League or any other superhero groups encounter a Doomsday Level Threat, a group of heroes, authority, and military forces will contain it within a proximity after clearing all civilians within it. If Superman and the rest fall, the Doomsday Protocol will commence by sending it to the Phantom Zone.[8]

In Action Comics, General Zod, along with Ursa and Non, appear in search of the son of Zod and Ursa.[9]

Supergirl #16 shows a form of life native to the Phantom Zone. These Phantoms are enraged over the use of their universe to house criminals and seek revenge on the one responsible.

During the "New Krypton" storyline, the Krytonians in Kandor have started to take matters into their own hands and started rounding up some of Superman's enemies to throw into the Phantom Zone. First, they attack the Science Police where they make off with Parasite. The second target is Silver Banshee who the Kandorians chase across the skies. At Arkham Asylum, the Kryptonians knock out Nightwing and Robin where they make off with Toyman while another group knocks out Black Lightning in order to claim Toyman. Bizarro is even attacked by Thara's group while flying. While Superman, Supergirl, and Zora are disgusted at what some of the Kandorians did and demands the ones responsible to turn themselves over to the authorities, Alura wouldn't cooperate and gives the orders to throw the villains they rounded up into the Phantom Zone.[10] Those who were thrown into the Phantom Zone were later freed by Superman.[11]

In the miniseries 52 the Phantom Zone is ingested by Mr. Mind while he is mutating into a giant insect form. Once fully-grown, Mind regurgitates it in an attempt to destroy Booster Gold and Rip Hunter, but the attack is deflected by Supernova, who returns the Phantom Zone to its proper dimensional plane. Supernova is able to control the Zone as his supersuit's powers are based upon Phantom Zone projector technology stolen by Rip Hunter.

In Action Comics #874, the Phantom Zone vanished.[12] Action Comics #886 offers a possible explanation as to the Phantom Zone's disappearance. The theory being that the Phantom Zone was actually the mythical Nightwing, counterpart to the Flamebird, imprisoned in an altered state of being. Having chosen a new Avatar, Chris Kent, who was freed from the Zone, he too would have been freed from his shackles, thus causing the Phantom Zone to cease to exist.[13]

In Adventure Comics (vol. 2) #11, the Phantom Zone is recreated by Chameleon Boy and Superman.[14]

The New 52 Edit In September 2011, The New 52 rebooted DC's continuity. In this new timeline, Jor-El suggests going into the Phantom Zone when Krypton was about to explode. Zod however appears with other Phantom Zone prisoners and attempts to escape the Phantom Zone. Krypto however sacrifices himself by attacking Xa-Du thus going into the Phantom Zone as well.[15]

It is revealed that the Doctor Xa-Du was the first Kryptonian prisoner to be sent to the Phantom Zone due to his forbidden experiments in suspended animation with Jor-El executing the sentence. The Phantom Zone is reverted to the Pre-Crisis version as the inmates can observe, but cannot interact with, the regular universe becoming literally "Phantoms".[16]

DC Rebirth Edit During the Dark Days: Metal event of the DC Rebirth reboot, Superman has theorized that the Phantom Zone might be actually a permeable membrane between Earth-0 (DC Universe) and the Dark Multiverse.[17] permeable membrane between Earth-0 (DC Universe) and the Dark Multiverse.[17]

Known inmates Edit Inmates in Pre-Crisis Edit Throughout the Silver Age of Comic Books, the following inhabitants of the Phantom Zone have been depicted. Based on this list, at least 34 Kryptonians were projected into the Phantom Zone on Krypton over a period of less than 256 Kryptonian days.[18] Refer to the entry on the Kryptonian Calendar for details on the relationship between Kryptonian sun-cycles and Earth years.

Ak-Var - Ak-Var was sentenced to approximately 30 Earth years (22 Kryptonian sun-cycles)[19] in the Phantom Zone for plotting to steal a revered relic called a Sun-Stone from a museum. After he had served his full sentence, Ak-Var was released by Superman and brought to the bottle-city of Kandor. Ak-Var became the lab assistant of Superman's cousin, Van-Zee.[20] Sometime later, Van-Zee adopted the costumed identity of Nightwing, and Ak-Var became his partner Flamebird.[21] Ar-Ual - Ar-Ual was sentenced to 50 Kryptonian sun-cycles (68.5 Earth years) in the Phantom Zone for destroying priceless knowledge and depriving Krypton of 1,000 years of scientific progress. When an alien space warship that was approaching Earth exploded, the blast opened a temporary rift in the Zone. Ar-Ual escaped the Zone, captured and imprisoned Wonder Woman, then impersonated her so that she could trick Superman into marriage. Ar-Ual figured that Superman would never suspect his wife of ruling the crime world. Superman uncovered her deception and returned her to the Zone.[22] Az-Rel - Az-Rel was a petty criminal from Bokos, the Island of Thieves. He possessed pyrotic powers. His partner, Nadira, possessed psychokinetic powers. Together they robbed helpless victims in Erkol, the oldest city of Krypton. Both were captured and sentenced to 15 Kryptonian sun-cycles (20.55 Earth years)[23] in the Phantom Zone. The two criminals were among those freed from the Zone when Quex-Ul was manipulated into building and activating a crude Phantom Zone Projector.[24] Later, Nadira was killed when the dying Jer-Em exposed her to green kryptonite. In her dying agony, Nadira telekinetically inflicted pain on Az-Rel, which unleashed his pyrokinesis upon himself, incinerating him.[25] Bal-Gra - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Bal-Gra once escaped from the Phantom Zone through a temporary space-warp. He boasted to Superman that he was the strongest man on Krypton. Lois Lane managed to expose Bal-Gra to gold kryptonite, which permanently robbed him of his superpowers. He was then sent back into the Zone by Lorraine Lewis, a brilliant scientist who had built her own Phantom Zone projector.[26] Blak-Du - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Blak-Du was Jor-El's roommate at Krypton College, and was rated as scientifically brilliant.[27] Cha-Mel - Cha-Mel was a clever youngster who developed a secret spray that enabled him to control his appearance. He turned to crime, but made the fatal mistake of impersonating Jor-El and attempting to rob his house. Jor-El returned home too soon and foiled Cha-Mel's attempt. The young thief was sentenced to the Phantom Zone for his crime. Years later, Cha-Mel managed to take the form of Superboy and trick the real Superboy into entering the Zone. Cha-Mel then manipulated Superboy's parents into freeing him. He tried to secure the Phantom Zone projector to free the other prisoners, but the device was destroyed in a tug-of-war with Krypto, returning him to the Phantom Zone while freeing Superboy.[28] General Dru-Zod (General Zod)[29] – General Zod was sentenced to 40 Kryptonian sun-cycles (54.8 Earth years) for using a duplicator ray to create a private army of imperfect clones (Bizarros) to overthrow the government.[30] Erndine Ze-Da (Zeda)[31] - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. One day, a South Seas volcano exploded, and the concussion opened a temporary gap in the Phantom Zone, enabling both Erndine Ze-Da and Dr. Xadu to escape. They concocted a plan to trap Superboy in the Zone, but he became aware of their scheme and stranded them on the planet Exon.[32] Years later, Erndine and Dr. Xadu, who had since married and acquired the secret of the cosmic power-grip, escaped from Exon and returned to Earth. Superman defeated them again, and placed them in separate cells on two different worlds.[33] Faora Hu-Ul – Faora is a martial arts expert and hater of males, who was sentenced to 300 Kryptonian sun-cycles (411 Earth years) in the Phantom Zone for causing the deaths of 23 men in her own concentration camp. She once escaped captivity by using telepathy to manipulate an Earthman named Jackson Porter into freeing her from the Zone.[34] Gann Artar - In one imaginary story, a criminal named Gann Artar was sentenced to 50 Kryptonian sun-cycles (68.5 Earth years) for using his de-evolutionary ray to create large, dangerous monsters.[35] Gaz-Or (the Mighty Gazor)[36] - After a lifetime of scientific villainy, and because he was dying of old age, the Mighty Gazor attempted to use his earthquake machine to destroy Krypton. He was stopped by Jor-El, who had arrived just in time, and was sentenced to the Phantom Zone for his crime. Gazor claimed that he had received the longest sentence ever given to anyone condemned to the Phantom Zone. This contradicts the fact that Jax-Ur and Orn-Zu both received life sentences. However, after Mon-El was released from the Zone in the 30th Century, Gazor was indeed the only prisoner remaining in that ghostly dimension.[37] Gor-Nu - Once the greatest biochemist on Krypton, Gor-Nu's reckless experiments caused several deaths. He was sentenced to 50 Kryptonian sun-cycles (68.5 Earth years) in the Phantom Zone. When a lethal crystal-menace threatened to destroy the bottle-city of Kandor, Superman released Gor-Nu in the hope that he could figure out a way to stop it. Gor-Nu was successful, but he then tried to betray Superman. Gor-Nu's plans were foiled and he was returned to the Zone.[38] Gra-Mo and two assistants - The criminal Gra-Mo and his two assistants (one possibly named Ni-Van[39]) were captured, sentenced to life for attempting to take over Krypton with Gra-Mo's robot hordes, placed in suspended animation, and imprisoned in a space capsule which was placed into orbit around Krypton. They were the last criminals to receive this type of punishment. After Krypton's destruction, the capsule drifted through space, and they eventually awakened and traveled to Earth. When Superboy learned of their criminal nature, he figured out a way to defeat them and projected them into the Phantom Zone.[40] The Inventor - The history and sentencing of this non-Kryptonian prisoner was not revealed.[41] Jackson Porter of Earth - Phantom Zone prisoner Faora Hu-Ul used telepathy to delude Jackson Porter into believing she was the ghost of his dead wife, Katie. Faora soon manipulated him into freeing her from the Zone. After she was returned to her prison, the permanently deluded Jackson chose to follow her into the Zone.[42] Jax-Ur – Jax-Ur was a rogue Kryptonian scientist who was sentenced to an eternity in the Phantom Zone for breaking the law forbidding anyone to experiment with an untested explosive. His rocket missed its target and destroyed Wegthor, an inhabited moon of Krypton, killing 500 colonists. He was the first prisoner projected into the Phantom Zone on Krypton. He also became the first prisoner to escape the Zone when a passing comet created a momentary warp through which he slipped.[43] Jer-Em – Jer-Em was a religious fanatic who was sentenced to 30 Kryptonian sun-cycles (41.1 Earth years) in the Phantom Zone for wiping out the superpowers of the people of Argo City (the birthplace of the future Supergirl) by guiding it back toward a red sun, leaving the residents stranded in their city in space.[44] Jer-Em was among those freed from the Zone when Quex-Ul was manipulated into building and activating a crude Phantom Zone Projector.[24] Later, Jer-Em purposely exposed himself to green kryptonite in order to enter the Kryptonian afterlife.[45] Kru-El - Kru-El was a weapons designer and cousin of Jor-El[46] (the father of the future Superman). He was sentenced to 35 Kryptonian sun-cycles (47.95 Earth years) for developing an arsenal of super-powerful, forbidden weapons.[47] Note: Kru-El is erroneously depicted wearing Dr. Xadu's outfit in at least five appearances. Kur-Dul - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Kur-Dul served his full sentence[48] and was released by Superman and the Kandorian parole board.[38] Lar Gand of Daxam (Mon-El) – A super-powered youth arrived on Earth with amnesia. He was found by Superboy, who suspected the youth may be his older brother. Superboy named him Mon-El, because they met on a Monday. When Mon-El was later exposed to lead, he collapsed in pain. His memory returned, and he explained that he is from the planet Daxam, whose natives have a lethal vulnerability to lead. To save Mon-El's life, Superboy projected him into the Phantom Zone.[49] Mon-El spent a thousand years in the Zone before he was released and cured by the Legion of Super-Heroes.[50] Lar-On - Lar-On found himself inflicted with a werecreature disease for which there was no known cure. He was sent into the Phantom Zone by Jor-El until a cure could be found for the disease. Lar-On was later unwittingly freed by a scientist named Professor Jeremiah Terry when he attempted to create a portal to Earth-Two. Lar-On was captured by Superman and Batman, who returned him to the Zone.[51] Lester Wallace of Earth - After being mentally manipulated by the Phantom Zone prisoner Zan-Em into developing a deep hatred of aliens and causing him to betray Superboy, Lester Wallace realized he had become the very thing he despised. He projected himself into the Phantom Zone as punishment.[52] L. Finn - The history and sentencing of this non-Kryptonian prisoner was not revealed.[41] Lois Lane of Earth – Lois Lane time-traveled back to Krypton before it exploded, and was accidentally trapped in the Phantom Zone by Jor-El when he was testing his new Projector device. She spent more than two and a half decades there before she was discovered and released by Superman.[53] Marok - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed.[53] Murkk - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed.[54] Murkk was among a group of Phantom Zone prisoners who escaped by focusing their mental energies on a piece of jewel kryptonite. He was later disintegrated by the Vrangs.[55] Nadira Va-Dim[56] - Nadira was a petty criminal from Bokos, the Island of Thieves. She possessed psychokinetic powers. Her partner, Az-Rel, possessed pyrotic powers. Together they robbed helpless victims in Erkol, the oldest city of Krypton. Both were captured and sentenced to 15 Kryptonian sun-cycles (20.55 Earth years)[57] in the Phantom Zone. The two criminals were among those freed from the Zone when Quex-Ul was manipulated into building and activating a crude Phantom Zone Projector.[24] Later, Nadira was killed when the dying Jer-Em exposed her to green kryptonite.[25] Nam-Ek - Rondors were a foul-smelling beast on Krypton whose horn radiated a natural healing ray. So valuable were the animals that their slaughter was outlawed. Five centuries ago, Nam-Ek, a Kryptonian scientist, killed two Rondors so that he could study the horn's powers. He extracted a serum from the healing horns, which would grant immortality. When four people died because no Rondors were available, he was charged with murder. He evaded capture and drank the serum. In the next instant, he mutated into a human Rondor. 500 years later when Krypton exploded, the immortal Nam-Ek was left drifting in space.[58][59] Nam-Ek was later retrieved by Amalak the Kryptonian-Killer, who attempted to kill him, but discovered that it was impossible. When Amalak's spaceship entered a yellow sun-system, Nam-Ek gained superpowers and headed to Earth to warn Superman. After Amalak's defeat, Nam-Ek was projected into the Phantom Zone by Superman because he had been exhibiting dangerous bouts of insanity.[60] Orn-Zu - Believing that Krypton's sun would soon go nova, Orn-Zu created Jorlan, an android designed to hypnotically lure children away. He intended to use it to save his world's youth by kidnapping them and taking them away from Krypton. Orn-Zu was sentenced to an eternity in the Phantom Zone. When Jorlan arrived on Earth, it attempted to complete its mission.[61] Orn-Zu convinced Superman to release him from the Zone, and they both confronted the android. Already dying from Pythagra Fever, Orn-Zu sacrificed his life to help stop his creation.[62] Py-Ron (Evil-Man) - Py-Ron was sentenced to 50 Kryptonian sun-cycles (68.5 Earth years) in the Phantom Zone for using forbidden experiments to turn humans into weird, bird-like monsters. Years later, a volcanic eruption freed Py-Ron from the Zone. He donned a costume and harassed Superman using the name Evil-Man. Superman soon captured Py-Ron and returned him to his prison. A few years after that, when Supergirl was forced through hypnosis by the Sisterhood of Evil to test a deadly poison on a super-human, Py-Ron agreed to be her test subject. When Py-Ron appeared to die, Supergirl was then forced to give the poison to Superman and herself. Luckily, Comet the Super-Horse had learned of the poison and altered it with his X-ray vision so that it only put the victims into suspended animation for a few hours. When Py-Ron woke up, he tried to earn his right to stay out of the Zone by flying to Feminax, the Sisterhood's homeworld, and killing everyone in retaliation. For his heartless action, Superman projected Py-Ron back into the Phantom Zone.[63] Quex-Ul (Charlie Kweskill) – Quex-Ul was sentenced to nearly 25 Earth years (18 Kryptonian sun-cycles) in the Phantom Zone for slaying the rare Rondors and cutting off their radiant, curative horns. He was the last prisoner projected into the Zone on Krypton. When he served his full sentence, Quex-Ul notified Superman and was released. Quex-Ul intended on getting revenge on Jor-El, the man who sentenced him to the Zone, by exposing his son Superman to gold kryptonite. When Superman proved that Quex-Ul was innocent, having been framed by Rog-Ar, Quex-Ul attempted to stop Superman from being exposed. Quex-Ul inadvertently exposed himself, and was robbed of his powers and his memory.[64] Clark Kent set Quex-Ul up with a job at the Daily Planet using the alias Charlie Kweskill.[24] Quex-Ul later sacrificed his life in a battle against the entity called Aethyr.[45] Ral-En - Ral-En was a college friend and associate of Jor-El, and son of the famous psychologist Mag-En. With the help of his father, Ral-En used hyper-hypnotism to make everyone believe he had gained superpowers, then attempted to become ruler of Krypton. Jor-El exposed his scheme, and Ral-En was sentenced to the Phantom Zone.[65] Note: The existence of both baby Kal-El (Superman) and the city of Kandor were crucial to this story. Since Kandor was stolen by Brainiac before the birth of Kal-El and the invention of the Phantom Zone projector, this entire story is impossible.[66] Ran-Zo - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed.[53] Ras-Krom - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Ras-Krom was a superstitious Kryptonian criminal who escaped the Phantom Zone when an atomic blast opened a small gap between worlds. He attempted to release the other prisoners, but was outwitted and re-imprisoned by Superman and Jimmy Olsen.[67] Roz-Em - The criminal Roz-Em had plastic surgery to look exactly like Nim-El (Jor-El's twin brother). He attempted to steal a valuable weapon from the Armory of Forbidden Weapons, but was captured by Jor-El and the real Nim-El. He was placed in suspended animation, and imprisoned in a space capsule which was placed into orbit around Krypton.[68] After Krypton's destruction, the capsule drifted through space, and Roz-Em eventually awakened and traveled to Earth. He planned on getting his revenge on Nim-El's nephew, Superboy, by pretending to be a Superman created from Superboy's exposure to red kryptonite. Superboy discovered Roz-Em's ruse and projected him into the Phantom Zone.[69] Shyla Kor-Onn[70] - A brilliant scientist named Shyla Kor-Onn was sentenced to 1 Kryptonian sun-cycle (1.37 Earth years) for the crime of manslaughter. She was trapped in the Phantom Zone well past her punishment period due to Krypton's destruction. After countless failures, Shyla predicted that she could use her mental powers to manipulate a jet pilot into flying his plane in a specific manner which would create a rip in the Zone. She escaped from her prison and battled Supergirl. When Shyla attempted to use the Phantom Zone Projector in Superman's Fortress of Solitude to free the other Phantom Zone prisoners, Supergirl was able to project her back into the Zone.[71] A short time later, Shyla was freed in the bottle-city of Kandor, where she attempted to get her revenge on Supergirl.[72] Tal-Var of the Dark Dimension - Jimmy Olsen accidentally released the evil Tal-Var from the Dark Dimension. He intended to loot and lay waste to the Earth, then to trap and kill Superman. Using his wits, Jimmy was able to project the alien into the Phantom Zone before he could carry out his threats.[73] Thul-Kar - The last of the Wizards of Juru, Thul-Kar used magic to teleport himself into the Phantom Zone on the day of Krypton's destruction. He was the first to discover the Phantom Zone's connections to the entity called Aethyr.[74] Tor-An - Tor-An was condemned to the Phantom Zone for carrying out forbidden experiments transferring the minds of a Kryptonian family into the bodies of monsters. Years later, he instructed a group of Phantom Zone prisoners to use their combined mental powers to prompt the Mayor of Midvale to ask Supergirl to perform a feat which would open a small rift in the Zone. The handsome Tor-An escaped and tricked Supergirl into marrying him. When he began to gloat that she would now be forever disgraced, he learned to his dismay that the marriage was invalid and that he himself had been tricked by Supergirl. He was quickly captured and returned to his prison.[75] The Toymaster - The history and sentencing of this non-Kryptonian prisoner was not revealed.[41] Tra-Gob – Tra-Gob was the leader of a band of Kryptonian thieves which raided the priceless Science Archives. He was betrayed by his own men, but was rescued by Jor-El before they could exterminate him. Tra-Gob was sentenced to nearly 40 Earth years (29 Kryptonian sun-cycles) for his crime, but still remained deeply grateful to Jor-El. Tra-Gob was in the Phantom Zone for nearly 30 Earth years[76] before he escaped due to a freak disruption by the Aurora Borealis. He rescued Superman and Lois Lane from a Kryptonian monster, repaying his debt to Jor-El. As Tra-Gob was being returned to the Zone to finish out his sentence, Superman commented that he may be pardoned in Kandor for his good behavior.[77] Tyb-Ol - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed.[54] Tyb-Ol was among a group of Phantom Zone prisoners who escaped by focusing their mental energies on a piece of jewel kryptonite. He was later disintegrated by the Vrangs.[55] Professor Va-Kox (Professor Vakox)[78] - Va-Kox, a mad geneticist, was sentenced to 50 Kryptonian sun-cycles (68.5 Earth years) for tossing a test tube full of his life force experiment into the Great Krypton Lake, creating a huge mutated monster.[79] Vax-Nor - The history and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Vax-Nor served his full sentence[48] and was released by Superman and the Kandorian parole board.[38] Vorb-Un - Vorb-Un was sentenced to 10 Kryptonian sun-cycles (13.7 Earth years)[80] in the Phantom Zone for experimenting with forbidden elements without the Science Council's permission. During a parole hearing in Kandor, Vorb-Un explained to Superman and the parole board that his sentence was almost up, and he insisted that he had repented. Due to his advanced age and his sincere remorse, he was released from his prison.[81] Vor-Kil - The crime and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed. Vor-Kil escaped from the Phantom Zone when sunspot activity opened a temporary gap to Earth. He battled Superman using the Kryptonian martial art of Klurkor. Superman lured him back into captivity with the help of Jimmy Olsen.[82] Dr. Xadu - Dr. Xadu was sentenced to 30 Kryptonian sun-cycles (41.1 Earth years)[83] for breaking the law which forbids the use of suspended animation in any scientific research.[30] He later escaped the Phantom Zone with a prisoner named Erndine Ze-Da when a South Seas volcano exploded and opened a temporary gap in the Phantom Zone. They concocted a plan to trap Superboy in the Zone, but he became aware of their scheme and stranded them on the planet Exon.[32] Years later, Dr. Xadu and Erndine, who had since married and acquired the secret of the cosmic power-grip, escaped from Exon and returned to Earth. Superman defeated them again, and placed them in separate cells on two different worlds.[33] Inexplicably, Dr. Xadu appeared in the Phantom Zone in many stories set between these two tales.[84] This contradiction is never addressed. Note: Kru-El is erroneously depicted wearing Dr. Xadu's outfit in at least five appearances. Zan-Ar - The crime and sentencing of this prisoner was not revealed.[53] Zan-Em - Zan-Em was a psychic scientist who was banished to the Phantom Zone for unauthorized mind control experiments. As part of his plan to escape the Zone and trap Superboy there, Zan-Em mentally manipulated Lester Wallace into developing a hatred of aliens. When Lester projected Superboy into the Zone, Zan-Em remarked that he had been in the prison dimension for nearly two decades.[85] Superboy escaped the Zone, leaving Zan-Em trapped in his prison.[86] Zo-Mar - The criminal Zo-Mar was captured, sentenced to life for attempting to enslave all of Krypton, placed in suspended animation, and imprisoned in a space capsule which was placed into orbit around Krypton. After Krypton's destruction, the capsule drifted through space, and Zo-Mar eventually awakened and traveled to Earth. With the help of the Challengers of the Unknown, Superman captured Zo-Mar and projected him into the Phantom Zone.[87] Unnamed Kandorian scientist - A scientist in Kandor was sentenced to 20 Kryptonian sun-cycles (27.4 Earth years) for performing experiments with the Z-Bomb, even though he was warned it could accidentally blow up the bottle-city.[88] Unnamed energy creature - An alien life form whose race evolved into pure energy followed an Earth probe back to Earth. The entity was able to possess and control other physical objects and beings, and used this ability to wreak havoc. Superman and Lois Lane tricked the creature into a Superman puppet, then projected it into the Phantom Zone.[89] Two unnamed members of the Superman Revenge Squad - Two members of the Superman Revenge Squad attempted to enslave the people of New Krypton (a.k.a. Rokyn), but Superman foiled their plans by projecting them into the Phantom Zone.[90] Inmates in Post-Crisis Inmates in Post-Crisis Edit The following were imprisoned in the Phantom Zone:

Az-Rel and Nadira Va-Dim - In the Post-Crisis, Az-Rel and his lover Nadira Va-Dim are Kryptonians that Ursa had enlisted to be sleeper agents on Earth.[91] Bizarro - He was thrown into the Phantom Zone by the Kandorians.[10] Car-Vex - A Kryptonian criminal who was banished to the Phantom Zone. General Zod later recruited her to be a sleeper agent on Earth where she infiltrated Project 7734 under the alias of Officer Romundi of the Science Police.[92] Dev-Em - A Kryptonian who was arrested and imprisoned in the Phantom Zone for murder and perversion.[93] Doomsday - Due to his adaptive powers, Doomsday evolved in a way where his fists tore through the Phantom Zone, allowing him to escape it. Faora - General Zod - A Kryptonian military general who was exiled to the Phantom Zone after trying to overthrow the Kryptonian Council so he could take over Krypton. Jax-Ur - Non - Non is a former friend and scientific colleague of Jor-El. After leading a separatist movement that planned to tell all of Krypton on what will happen to their planet, he is abducted and lobotomized by Krypton's Science Council. This leaves him a minimally-verbal and highly-aggressive brute. Some aspects of his personality survive and surface as an extreme kindness when dealing with children. Serving as General Zod's enforcer, he also becomes guardian and caregiver for Zod's son Chris Kent. Parasite - He was thrown into the Phantom Zone by the Kandorians.[10] Prankster - He was thrown into the Phantom Zone by the Kandorians.[10] Prometheus - Quex-Ul - In the Post-Crisis, Quex-Ul is a Kryptonian criminal who was banished to the Phantom Zone and was later recruited by General Zod to be a sleeper agent on Earth.[92] Silver Banshee - She was thrown into the Phantom Zone by the Kandorians.[10] Tor-An - A Kryptonian who was on General Zod's side and was imprisoned in the Phantom Zone. When Ursa was charged with assigning five Krypontians as sleeper agents on Earth, Tor-An assumed the identity of a human entrepreneur named David Carter and became the CEO of the Empire Communications Network based out of Sydney Australia. He was defeated by Flamebird and Nightwing and reimprisoned in the Phantom Zone. Tor-An was later killed by Ursa.[94] Toyman - He was thrown into the Phantom Zone by the Kandorians.[10] Ursa - Ursa is the lover of General Zod and mother of Chris Kent. After Non is lobotomized by the Science Council, she instigated open rebellion along with General Zod. As a result, the three were exiled to the Phantom Zone. Val-Ty - A Kryptonian sociopath who once fought Tomar-Re whom he eluded by destroying Xan City. He was later captured and placed in the Phantom Zone. When Zod's blanket amnesty was issued, he and the other Phantom Zone criminals were released. Unlike the group who went with Ursa, Val stayed on New Krypton, going rogue. He was the target of a manhunt by the Military Guild, and was eventually captured by Kal-El's Red Shard for which he has vowed revenge. White Martians - Inmates in All-Star Superman Edit Bar-El - A Kryptonian astronaut who was one of a few survivors of Krypton. He and Lilo were placed in the Phantom Zone until Superman can find a cure for their Kryptonite illness. Lilo - A Kryptonian astronaut who was one of a few survivors of Krypton. She and Bar-El were placed in the Phantom Zone until Superman can find a cure for their Kryptonite illness. Inmates in The New 52 Edit General Zod - Faora - Jax-Ur - Krypto - Sealed in the Phantom Zone when stopping Xa-Du from escaping. He was released by Superman in Action Comics #13 (Dec. 2012). Non - Ras-Krom - Ursa - Vak-Ox - Xa-Du - A scientist who was incarcerated in the Phantom Zone for doing illegal experiments revolving around suspended animation. Other versions Edit Superman & Batman: Generations Edit In the Elseworlds tale Superman & Batman: Generations, Superman is sentenced to the Phantom Zone in 1989 when he is stripped of his powers in a confrontation with the Ultra-Humanite that ends with his foe's death, after the Ultra-Humanite's actions lead to the death of Superman's wife Lois Lane and his son Joel being tricked into killing Superman's cousin Kara before Joel dies himself, as well as arranging various 'accidents' for Clark Kent's other remaining loved ones. The judges reason that even if Superman feels he may have killed his foe deliberately after the deaths of his family and friends, putting him in a conventional prison without his powers would be dangerous and solitary confinement was too extreme given his past deeds, selecting the Zone based on the suggestion of the new Batman, Bruce Wayne Junior. Superman is released in 1999 by the now-rejuvenated Bruce Wayne as Bruce returns to the role Batman- Bruce noting that he is ending the sentence a few months early but is certain that nobody would object to early release "for good behavior"- although Superman was briefly able to appear as a phantom in the real world in 1997 to distract a foe who was about to kill Knightwing (Superman's grandson, adopted by Batman's son after the deaths of Superman's children).

In other media Edit Television Edit In the 1978 season of Super Friends there is an episode titled "Terror from the Phantom Zone" in which a comet's collision causes the Phantom Zone to release three Kryptonian villains Hul (voiced by Stanley Jones), Rom-Lok (voiced by Michael Bell), and Logar (voiced by Bob Holt) who are exclusive to this series. The villains go on a crime spree and banish the Super Friends to the Phantom Zone, but keep Superman on Earth where they exposed him to red kryptonite which causes him to age quickly, though the red kryptonite also gave Rom-Lok an appearance that resembles Shaggy Man. The villains get great enjoyment showing off "old Superman" to the world. Superman, with help from the Justice League computer, manages to figure out that blue kryptonite may reverse the aging process because blue kryptonite is harmful to Bizarro and therefore should be helpful to Superman. Superman finds the blue kryptonite and is aged back to normal, then goes on his quest to rescue the other Super Friends and ultimately send the three villains back into the Phantom Zone. The three villains later return in a "lost season" episode from 1983 titled "Return of the Phantoms". Here, they hijack an alien's time-space conveyor and go back in time to Smallville and attack Superboy, in order to prevent him from becoming Superman. Fortunately, the pilot of that craft went to warn the Super Friends about what the trio would be attempting, and guided Superman and Green Lantern to the proper time period to help the boy. The Super Friends version of the Phantom Zone is described as, "Far beyond the boundaries of the Milky Way. In the uncharted void of deep space. An incredible 5th dimension of space and time, lies parallel to the universe that we know. This interesting interstellar warp which holds the most sinister and ruthless criminals in the galaxy is the infamous Phantom Zone". The molecular structure of any person exiled in the Zone appears white and black. Batman's devices and the Wonder Twins' Exxor Powers are useless within the Phantom Zone. The Phantom Zone appears in the Superman episode "The Hunter". General Zod and his female followers Ursa and Faora are shown as prisoners in the Phantom Zone. Although the Phantom Zone isn't explicitly mentioned or shown in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, there is a similar type of medium which resembles its representation in season four episodes "Meet John Doe" and "Lois and Clarks". An Utopian from the future Andrus programmed a "time tablet" to trap fugitive Tempus in a space-time cube if he tried to control the tablet. However, Tempus tricked Superman into being trapped in the cube, which was then lost in space-time. Superman was rescued by H.G. Wells when the exact second Clark who disappeared was discovered. Another episode from that season "Battleground Earth" featured another analogue, a Kryptonian form of capital punishment (practiced by a surviving colony); devices capable of scattering a criminal's body across the universe. Superman was sentenced to this punishment, but due to newly discovered facts and a violation of procedure the process was reversed before it could be completed. It is unclear whether a fully complete procedure could be reversed, and if so, whether there is a point after which it becomes irreversible. Superman was feeling shaky immediately after the procedure (which appeared to be painful), but recovered quickly. The Phantom Zone is first mentioned in the first episode of Superman: The Animated Series, "The Last Son of Krypton, Part 1". Jor-El attempted to convince everyone to enter the Phantom Zone to be saved from Krypton's destruction, and one man would be sent via spaceship to re-establish Krypton's population on a new world. Since this idea was not accepted by Krypton's Science Council, Jor-El sent his son in the spaceship to Earth along with the Phantom Zone projector. In the episode "Blasts from the Past", Superman discovers the Phantom Zone projector which also has a communication function that allows him to converse with the inmates. He makes contact with the convicted traitor Mala (who is a loose adaptation of Superman II's Ursa). He learns that Mala's 20-year sentence in the Phantom Zone is finished and releases her. He hoped to train Mala as his co-worker. Unfortunately, Superman then learns that Mala is arrogant and power-hungry, badly enough to possibly require returning her to the Phantom Zone. When she learns that Kal-El (Superman's Kryptonian name) prefers the company of a certain terrestrial named Lois Lane, Mala turns against Superman, and later releases General Jax-Ur (a version of General Zod, although named after another villain from the Superman comics) to take over Earth. They were banished once again into the Phantom Zone at the end of the story as Superman commented "Parole revoked". In "Absolute Power", Jax-Ur and Mala are later accidentally released on another remote planet where they remake it into Krypton's image. During a fight with the Kryptonian fleet, Jax-Ur and Mala are ultimately sent into a black hole. In the Justice League Unlimited episode "The Doomsday Sanction", Superman and the Justice League send the nearly unstoppable Doomsday into the Phantom Zone after his capture. This usage of the Phantom Zone, effectively sentencing Doomsday to life imprisonment without trial, presented massive arguments about the Justice League's right to make such judgments. Batman was especially troubled by this move because their verdict on Doomsday would've been a decision that the Justice Lords would've made. In the Legion of Super Heroes animated series, the Phantom Zone is close to its classical portrayal as a parallel dimension where criminals are sent. As a throwback to the Pre-Crisis version, inhabitants of the Zone become incorporeal - essentially, ghost-like phantoms - thus giving the Zone its name. In this series, Superman discovers his previous self's Phantom Zone projector, which he accidentally uses to free a villain named Drax (voiced by Greg Ellis). The projector is eventually turned on the other Legionnaires, but with Phantom Girl's help, they manage to escape without it and send Drax back at the same time. On a related note, Drax mentioned that he was born in the Phantom Zone. In the television series Smallville, in the fifth-season premiere "Arrival", Clark Kent battles two evil Kryptonians named Nam-Ek & Aethyr (Disciples of Zod). When he refuses to join them in their quest to subjugate Earth, the Kryptonians attempt to banish Clark to the Phantom Zone using a metallic bracelet (inscribed with Kryptonian symbols) that opens up a vortex. However, Clark manages to turn the tables, sending them into the portal instead. Aside from its entrance, the Phantom Zone is represented as a floating black square, similar to its depiction in the Superman films. In the episode "Solitude", the Kryptonian artificial intelligence known as Brainiac (posing as Professor Milton Fine) manipulates Clark into believing that Jor-El is responsible for Martha's mysterious illness. This is all part of a plot to free the imprisoned General Zod. Professor Fine persuades Clark to take him to the Fortress of Solitude, where he gives Clark a black crystal and instructs him to insert it into the Fortress' control console, misleadingly saying that it will destroy Jor-El and therefore save Martha. However, the crystal, once inserted into the console, instead opens up a vortex in which another black square is seen, with a figure resembling General Zod as portrayed in the Superman movies. However, Brainiac's plan is thwarted once Clark removes the crystal. In the episode "Vessel", General Zod is finally freed from the Phantom Zone. After inhabiting Lex Luthor, Zod traps Clark inside the Phantom Zone using a Kryptonian bracelet similar to the one used in the episode "Arrival". In the season premiere of the sixth season, the Phantom Zone itself is shown as a desolate wasteland where Clark is rendered powerless and mortal. It is revealed to have been created by Jor-El as a prison for not only Kryptonian convicts, but also criminals from the "28 known galaxies". The more dangerous prisoners (e.g. General Zod and Bizarro) are stripped of their corporeal forms and their spirits are then cast into the Zone. Clark escapes with the help of a Kryptonian woman named Raya, who claims to have known Jor-El. To ensure her survival, Jor-El sent Raya to the Phantom Zone just before the destruction of Krypton. Raya reveals that those of the blood of Jor-El's house can utilize a secret exit from the Phantom Zone, therefore Clark can leave. Upon escaping the Phantom Zone, Clark accidentally releases Raya and various prisoners and phantoms to Earth. Chloe Sullivan later refers to the escaped convicts as "Zoners". In the season 7 finale, "Arctic", it is revealed that Brainiac has trapped Kara in the Phantom Zone. In the season eight episode "Bloodline", Clark and Lois are both trapped in the Phantom Zone, where they are reunited with Kara. Also Zod's wife Faora takes control of Lois' body so she can be set free by Kara, and goes on a rampage in Metropolis. In the season ten episode "Icarus", Clark uses a crystal of El to send Slade Wilson to the Zone. When Wilson is found back on Earth in "Dominion", Clark and Oliver Queen enter the Zone to see how that escape was possible. They learn that the clone of Zod - who was sent to New Krypton with the others - was sent to the Phantom Zone for his crimes. While there he merged with the Phantom of the original Zod, gaining all of his memories, and a blood transfusion from Clark allowed him to send others out of the Zone. Clark departs the Zone while destroying the control console on the Phantom Zone side in order to prevent anyone else from leaving. In the pilot episode of Supergirl, Kara's capsule accidentally ended up in the Phantom Zone - which is depicted as an actual area of real-space in which time doesn't pass/exist rather than a separate dimension - following Krypton's explosion. It was also shown that the Phantom Zone had a maximum security prison called Fort Rozz which housed criminals like Astra, Caren Falqnerr, the Commander, Dr. Alphonse Luzano, Gabriel Phillips, Gor, a Hellgrammite, Indigo, Jemm, K'hund, Kerfuffle, Moyer, Mur, Non, Tor, and Vartox where they have personal issues with Alura Zor-El who had them imprisoned in Fort Rozz prison. The Master Jailer was one of the prison guards in Fort Rozz. When Kara's capsule left the Phantom Zone, Fort Rozz was intentionally pulled out with her as Indigo revealed that she took control of Kara's escape pod in order to do that. As a result of Fort Rozz being pulled out of the Phantom Zone and crashing on Earth, many of its inmates had escaped. Additionally, there is also a Phantom Zone projector - a device used by Kryptonians to transport prisoners in Fort Rozz and than into Zone. It was later collected and stored in Fortress of Solitude by Kal-El. In "Resist", Kara, Lilian Luthor and Hank Henshaw use this projector to board into Daxamite ship during their invasion to save Lena Luthor and Mon-El from Rhea. After rescuing them, Lilian betrays and leaves Kara and Mon-El behind while beaming her daughter and themselves to Fortress. However, Kara expected her betrayal and her friend Winn Schott Jr. put a bug device on Hank prior to rescue operation. Supergirl turned on the device to force Hank reactivate the projector to beam Mon-El out of the spaceship, while she stayed behind to confront Rhea. The Phantom Zone appears in the Justice League Action episode "Field Trip". As Superman gives Blue Beetle, Firestorm and Stargirl a tour of the Fortress of Solitude, they are shown to the Phantom Zone projector where General Zod, Faora and Quex-Ul are accidentally released and Superman is accidentally trapped. With some guidance from Martin Stein, Firestorm learns how to transmute some of the ice into Kryptonite to weaken the Kryptonian villains. Afterwards, Superman is freed from the Phantom Zone and the Kryptonian villains are thrown back into the Phantom Zone. Films Edit In the 1950 film serial, Atom Man vs Superman, Lex Luthor traps Superman in another dimension. Though the Phantom Zone would not appear in the comics until eleven years later, it is styled in the same fashion and is named by Luthor as The Empty Doom. In the 1978 Superman film starring Christopher Reeve, the Phantom Zone is presented as a large, flat rhombus-shaped mirror that moves by spinning. Jor-El (Marlon Brando), who developed the Phantom Zone summons it with a wand to imprison General Zod (Terence Stamp) and his co-conspirators Ursa (Sarah Douglas), and Non (Jack O'Halloran), who appear to be transferred into the two-dimensional space on the mirror's surface, which is then flung into deep space. The Phantom Zone is only referred to by name in the extended versions of Superman when it is mentioned by the Kryptonian First Elder. Superman's mother Lara refers to the Phantom Zone by name in Superman II when she first makes the revelation about the three villains contained inside it. In his DVD commentary, director Richard Donner refers to it as "the Zone of Silence". In Superman II, as Superman saves the city of Paris from destruction by hurling a nuclear bomb into space, the resulting nuclear explosion inadvertently shatters the Phantom Zone and releases the three prisoners. Now free, General Zod and his cohorts travel to Earth, wreaking havoc with the powers granted to them by Earth's yellow sun. The Phantom Zone appears in Richard Donner's cut of Superman II, released in November 2006. In this version (per the original shooting script prior to being altered by director Richard Lester for the theatrical version), the Phantom Zone is shattered by the rocket Superman threw into space in the first Superman film. The Zone is shown splitting into three separate shards, one containing each villain, before it finally shatters, freeing them. Jor-El presents a visual representation of the Phantom Zone and its occupants in a recorded message embedded in the education crystals housed at the Fortress of Solitude, unaware that he is actually talking to Lex Luthor and Miss Teschmacher. After defeating Zod and his followers, Superman uses a time-warp to keep the three criminals imprisoned in the Phantom Zone while undoing the damage they had done during their time on Earth. In the Supergirl movie, the sorceress Selena banishes Kara to the Phantom Zone by means of a summoned crystal shard. The crystal transports her to a barren, desolate world where it shatters, casting her to the ground. This depiction of the Phantom Zone suggests that the crystal shard seen in the first two Superman movies is not the Phantom Zone itself, but simply a vehicle that takes prisoners to this desolate wasteland which is referred to as the Phantom Zone, similar to the later Smallville TV series. Once in the zone, Kara loses her powers as Supergirl and becomes an ordinary mortal. In this movie, it is also revealed that there is a way out of the Zone, although the trip to the exit portal is extremely dangerous and would almost lead to certain death. Kara is guided to this portal by Zaltar, another Kryptonian who was banished there. Kara is successfully able to transport herself back to earth using this portal, although Zaltar is killed in the attempt. Following Kara's escape, the defeated Selena and her henchwoman Bianca are both banished to the Phantom Zone. In the direct-to-video animated feature Superman: Brainiac Attacks, Superman had to enter the Phantom Zone to retrieve a rare element which will cure Lois Lane of a deadly disease. This version of the Phantom Zone differs from previous animated continuity, as it is shown to actually be populated by "phantoms" and Superman retains his powers in the Phantom Zone. The Phantom Zone is featured in All-Star Superman. Like the comics, Superman places Bar-El and Lilo into the Phantom Zone until a cure for their Kryptonite illness can be found. In the 2013 reboot film Man of Steel, General Zod, Faora, Car-Vex, Dev-Em II, Jax-Ur, Nadira, Nam-Ek, Tor-An, and some unnamed followers of General Zod are sentenced to 300 cycles of somatic reconditioning in the Phantom Zone following their attempted coup d'état against the Kryptonian government and General Zod's murder of Jor-El. Upon sentencing, Zod and his co-conspirators are infused within a gelatinous substance, encased in a crystalline material and are subsequently loaded into a Kryptonian ship. The ship then launches into orbit around Krypton where three smaller vessels establish a window into the Phantom Zone into which the ship enters. A short time later, the destruction of Krypton triggers the release of the prisoners. Later in the film, it is revealed that the vessels Zod and his army are using possess a "Phantom Drive", a collision from a smaller ship (piloted by Col. Hardy of the U.S. military with Kal-El's rocket and operated by Professor Emil Hamilton and Lois Lane) with a similar drive causes a cataclysmic reaction that creates a small singularity, returning the ship and its occupants to the Phantom Zone along with the Military plane, Hardy, and Hamilton. The Phantom Zone appears in The Lego Batman Movie. It appears as a prison for the most dangerous villains in the Lego multiverse. The setting on the Phantom Zone Projector when releasing the inmates are "Dark Lords Only," "Witches & Queens Only," "Monsters & Robots Only," and "Release All Inmates". Aside from its gatekeeper "Phyllis" (voiced by Ellie Kemper) who resembles a generic Lego brick, its inmates consist of villains from various fictional franchises including General Zod, King Kong, Lord Voldemort from Harry Potter, Sauron's Eye of Sauron from Lord of the Rings, the Daleks from Doctor Who, the Gremlins, the Wicked Witch of the West and her Flying Monkeys from The Wizard of Oz, Lord Vampyre, the Evil Mummy, and a Swamp Creature from Lego Monster Fighters, the Kraken from Clash of the Titans, Medusa from Lego Minifigures, the skeletons from Jason and the Argonauts, Agent Smith and his clones from The Matrix, the titular Great White Shark from Jaws, and a Tyrannosaurus and the Velociraptors from Jurassic Park. This group of villains have been referred to as the "Ubers" in the credits. Superman talked about it on the news program "Metropolis in Focus" as a tie-in to his latest victory over General Zod. When Joker gets sent to the Phantom Zone by Batman, he persuades the inmates he meets in the Phantom Zone to help him take over Gotham City. After infiltrating Arkham Asylum, Harley Quinn helps release them using the Phantom Zone Projector under the "Release All Inmates" option. With help from Robin, Batgirl, Alfred Pennyworth, and Gotham City's villains, Batman manages to defeat the Phantom Zone villains and send them back to the Phantom Zone. This is the second depiction of the Joker being banished to the Phantom Zone, the first being in the story "Truth and Justice" by J.C. Ro History The Phantom Zone is an interdimensional realm outside the normal space/time continuum. It is a barren and insubstantial null area absent of any physical material. There is only one native denizen to the Phantom Zone, the enigmatic and powerful entity known as the Aethyr. All cause and effect that occurs within the zone does so at Aethyr's capricious whim. People who travel into the negative zone are no longer corporeal and exist only as psychic phantasms of their true selves. Though their minds and personalities remain intact, they can no longer physically interact with any other being. This includes direct physical contact as well as the power of speech. Communication within the Phantom Zone is done so by telepathy. As the Phantom Zone exists outside of space/time, those within it are no longer subject to the rigors of age or illness, rendering them effectively immortal – and they also require no sleep, food or air.

Many years ago, the penal system of the planet Krypton sentenced their criminals by placing them in suspended animation. The Kryptonian scientist Jor-El discovered the existence of the Phantom Zone and introduced it as an alternative means of imprisonment. He had little knowledge of the true inner workings of the zone, but believed that it was a more humane form of punishment over that which they had previously employed. He developed a projection device that could send people into and retrieve them from the zone with the simple flick of a black button and a white button respectively. The first prisoner to be exiled to the Phantom Zone was the renegade scientist Jax-Ur. Jax-Ur, a former colleague of Jor-El's, was responsible for the destruction of Krypton's moon Wegthor and the deaths of over five-hundred lunar colonists. Over a short expanse of time, the Kryptonian Science Council began exiling the worst of the planet's criminals into the zone, the most famous of which was the military insurrectionist General Zod.

When Jor-El later discovered that Krypton was going to explode due to geological instability, he proposed bringing the entire population of Krypton into the zone. Jor-El never had the opportunity or approval to conduct such a plan, and ultimately everyone living on the planet Krypton died when it exploded.

Those within the Phantom Zone survived however. It was years before they ever learned the truth about their home-world's destruction. Several of the exiled criminals, now led by General Zod, found a means of escaping the zone and eventually came to Earth where they battled the "Last Son" of Krypton, Jor-El's son Kal-El.

It was later revealed that the Phantom Zone is in fact the mythical "Underworld", home to the likes of Hades, Annwn, Erishkagal and Pluto.[1]

Residents Earth-One Aethyr Ak-Var Az-Rel Doctor Xadu Faora Hu-Ul Gaz-Or General Zod Lor-Zod Gra-Mo Jax-Ur Jer-Em Khai-Zor Kru-El Lar-On Mon-El Nadira Nam-Ek Professor Va-Kox Quex-Ul Shyla Kor-Onn (Formerly) Superboy (Formerly) Supergirl (Formerly)[2] Thul-Kar Zora Vi-Lar Mentioned inmates There were also some Kryptonians that were mentioned to have been imprisoned in The Phantom Zone as seen in the Phantom Zone mini-series.

The mentioned male Kryptonian Inmates include:

Ar-Ual Bal-Gra Cha-Mel Gaz-Or Kur-Dul Orn-Zu Ras-Krom Roz-Em Tor-An Tra-Gob Vax-Nor Vorb-Un Vor-Kil The mentioned female Kryptonian Inmates include:

Erndine Ze-Da New Earth General Zod Ursa Non Az-Rel Car-Vex Dev-Em Faora Prometheus (Formerly) Jax-Ur Nadira Quex-Ul Tor-An Val-Ty The New 52 Batgirl (Formerly) Benjamin Rubel (Formerly) General Zod (Formerly) Cyborg Superman Eradicator (Formerly) Faora Hades Jax-Ur Lor-Zod (Formerly) Mongul (Formerly) Non Ras-Krom Steel (Formerly) Supergirl (Formerly) Super-Man (Formerly) Superman (Clark Kent) (Formerly) Superman (Lex Luthor) (Formerly) Superwoman (Formerly) Ursa (Formerly) Vak-Ox Xa-Du All-Star Superman Bar-El Lilo Smallville Faora Zod Raya (Formerly) Clark Kent (Formerly) Slade Wilson (Formerly) Lois Lane (Formerly) Kara Kent (Formerly) Oliver Queen (Formerly) Gloria (Formerly) Aldar (Formerly) Titan (Formerly)

Notes In the Richard Donner series of Superman movies which includes Supergirl, the Phantom Zone's gateway is depicted in the form of a rotating pane of glass, while the actual landscape is a desolate wasteland. Entry into the Phantom Zone is usually done by the gateway consuming its victims upon contact. Jur-Ll, an otherdimensional criminal version of Jor-El, was banished into an otherdimensional version of Phantom Zone. It is revealed in 2006's Absolute Crisis on Infinite Earths that Jur-Ll came from Earth-Three. There was no Phantom Zone on Earth-Two dimension; criminal kryptonians were banished in rocketships. [3]


Fort Rozz Continent Lurvan City Kandor Locale Fort Rozz First appearance Krypton Chronicles #1 (September, 1981)

Contents[hide] History Earth-One New Earth Residents See Also History Earth-One Fort Rozz was an ancient Kryptonian military installation. In the Kryptonian year 9846, it became a pivotal location for the Kandor-Kryptonopolis Federation during the Last War. General-in-Chief Pir-El served at Fort Rozz on the day that the continents of Erkol and Urrika launched a robattack against Kandor. General El defended his post by launching disintegrator spheres at the advancing combatants. Although his strategy was sound, the enemy retaliated by using red sun weaponry to destroy Kandor's sister city, Kryptonopolis. [1]

New Earth In New Earth continuity, Fort Rozz was actually a Kryptonian prison. In later years, it became a temporary holding facility, containing criminals on trial before they would be sentenced to the Phantom Zone. A Kryptonian criminal known as Dev-Em was sentenced to Fort Rozz for crimes of murder and perversion, but as things turned out, a riot broke out in the prison before the administrators could activate the Phantom Zone Projector. In the midst of the chaos, the projector exploded and the entire prison was transferred directly into the Phantom Zone.

In the Phantom Zone, Fort Rozz existed as a bizarre anomaly. Unlike other elements inside the Zone, Fort Rozz maintained its mass and density and did not become an insubstantial structure like everything else in the Zone. Zoners who entered the Fort found that they could become solid, corporeal beings once again. In addition, time passed normally inside of Fort Rozz, whereas the rest of the Zone was a null-field outside of space and time. It was because of these properties that Phantom Zone criminals Zod and Ursa were able to kill the existing guards and take the fort as their own. It also allowed them to conceive and raise a son, Lor-Zod. A side effect of Lor-Zod's conception inside the fort was that he always maintained his physical form, even outside the fort's perimeters.

General Zod was able to salvage technology from inside the fort and use it to send Lor-Zod to Earth. From there, the child was able to pave the way for Zod and Ursa's escape from the Phantom Zone.

Soon after, Zod and several other Phantom Zone criminals fought against Superman and exiled him into the Phantom Zone. There, he reunited with his childhood friend, the Daxamite Mon-El inside of Fort Rozz. He also found himself in conflict with criminal Dev-Em who elected to remain in the prison while Zod and the others journeyed to Earth. Superman and Mon-El managed to defeat Dev-Em and Mon-El helped put together a rocket that could help Superman escape from the zone. [2]

Following the Zoners failed bid to destroy Metropolis, Zod and the others (including his son) were banished once again into the Phantom Zone. Lor-Zod fled from his parents and hid inside the smaller ducts and catacombs of Fort Rozz. It was at this time that he began having inexplicable growth spurts, rapidly aging to that of a teenager.

He discovered some reverse-engineered Brainiac technology that had been left behind from when the fort was still on Krypton and realized that his parents were using it to plan their next escape. Lor-Zod donned a headband from one of the probes and this created a psionic link with Thara Ak-Var. Shortly thereafter, Thara Ak-Var appeared in the Phantom Zone and united with Lor. Using a miniaturized Phantom Zone Projector, they were able to escape the zone together. [3]

Kryptonian leader Alura-El eventually pardoned General Zod and his followers and they abandoned Fort Rozz to re-establish themselves on New Krypton.

Shortly thereafter, the Phantom Zone collapsed upon itself and Fort Rozz was (presumably) destroyed.

Residents Pir-El Dev-Em Dru-Zod Jax-Ur Lor-Zod Non Ursa

Rozz

in: Locations, Prisons Fort Rozz (prison) EDIT

SHARE For the Supergirl episode of the same name, see "Fort Rozz". Fort Rozz

Information Location Space Earth (formerly) Phantom Zone (formerly) Use(s) Maximum-security prison Source Fort Rozz was Krypton's maximum-security prison. It was previously located within the Phantom Zone, but followed Kara Zor-El's pod, making its way to Earth, where it crashed in Nevada. Supergirl later lifted Fort Rozz into space when the prison was used to power Myriad.

Contents[hide] History Guards Known inmates Former inmates Appearances Supergirl Season 1 Season 2 Season 3 Comics Adventures of Supergirl TV Guide Comic-Con edition References HistoryEdit Fort Rozz resided in the Phantom Zone. However, after Kara Zor-El's pod unknowingly entered the Zone, the prison followed along as it exited the Phantom Zone. As they reached Earth, Fort Rozz crashed in to a field in Nevada,[1] releasing its prisoners.[2]

Following the crash the D.E.O. downloaded the database of the crashed prison ship, and used its own stealth technology to conceal it, cutting off the area and masquerading it as a nuclear test zone. It was later revealed to Alex by Non that Fort Rozz became his and Astra's base of operations.[1]

After Myriad was stopped by Kara. It was revealed that the source was coming from Nevada, where Sam Lane explained that months after it crashed they obtained what they could and then used its own stealth technology to hide it. He also said the area was quarantined as nuclear testing site and as such was declared off limits.[1]

Following the death of Indigo and the defeat of Non, the only way to prevent Myriad from killing everyone on Earth was to launch Rozz itself into space. At the risk of her own life Kara lifted Fort Rozz into space and pushed it away from Earth.[1]

Supergirl visited Fort Rozz with Livewire, Saturn Girl and Psi to find a Kryptonian priestess named Jindah Kol Rozz in hopes of finding intel on their enemy Reign. Since the prison found its way to a blue sun, its toxicity killed all male prisoners. A short battle ensued between Supergirl, Reign, and Livewire before Psy forced Reign to retreat, and Livewire sacrificed herself to protect Supergirl. Fort Rozz was soon incinerated by the blue sun.[3]

GuardsEdit Master Jailer (incarcerated) Facet Jens Known inmatesEdit Former inmatesEdit Astra (deceased) The Commander (status unknown) Caren Falqnerr Moyner Falqnerr (deceased) Gor (status unknown) Unnamed Hellgrammite (deceased) Indigo (deceased) Jemm (deceased) Kerfuffle Unnamed K'hund (incarcerated) Dr. Alphonse Luzano (Prisoner 2445) Mandrax (incarcerated) Mur (status unknown) Non (status unknown) Gabriel Phillips (deceased) Prisoner 2440 (deceased) Prisoner 2441 (deceased) Prisoner 2442 (deceased) Prisoner 2443 (deceased) Psi (non-canon) Jindah Kol Rozz (deceased) Tor (status unknown) Tormock (incarcerated) Vartox (deceased) Xitheria (deceased) Fort Rhandark Fort Rhandark is a series of Star Castle like space platforms,set across time and space,used to hold the imprisoned remains of convicted criminals,placed in suspended animation chambers. Look up Prisoners of Space.Lost in Space. GAMES MOVIES TV VIDEO WIKIS Search

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SHARE ← "The Galaxy Gift" | Episodes of Lost in Space | "Visit to a Hostile Planet" →

Episode Name Condemned of Space

Series Lost in Space Season Three Original Air-Date September 6, 1967 Written By Peter Packer Directed By Nathan Juran Order in Series 60th in Series Order in Season 1st in Season Previous Episode "The Galaxy Gift" Next Episode "Visit to a Hostile Planet" Title Card Prison2

The orbit of the Robinson’s planet has become erratic and dangerous. Since the planet will soon collide with a comet, the Jupiter 2 makes an emergency lift-off and departs. They manage to escape the gravitational pull of the comet and continue safely through space.

Doctor Smith records an SOS message to toss out of the ship, but when he opens the hatch, the Robot gets sucked through and out into space. No one wants the Robot to drift through space alone forever, so John puts on a spacesuit and goes out to rescue him. He doesn’t manage to do so,and the Robinsons are drawn through a supernova but luckily, the Robot manages to get back on his own.

The Jupiter 2 is pulled into a void, where they dock at a strange ship. John and Don decide to get out and look around for spare parts. They find many people aboard, all frozen. It appears to be an automated prison ship that has somehow fallen into disrepair. Its only crew is a computer and a robot guard. John discovers that the time lapse computer which was supposed to measure the sentences of the prisoners has also been frozen and stopped working long ago.

Smith, Will and the Robot later go down to investigate as well. Doctor Smith decides to thaw one of the prisoners out and is immediately attacked by the man. The prisoner, whose name is Phanzig, forces Smith to stand on a freezing pedestal and commands him to stay there. Smith disobeys and runs off, and an alarm sounds.

The robot guard hears the alarm and sets off to find the escaped prisoner. He ends up finding Don instead, and he freezes the Major and takes him away for questioning. Phanzig catches Smith once again and forces him back onto the freezing pedestal. Smith tells Phanzig that they can both escape because he has a ship, and Phanzig decides that they can work together.

Will and the Robot find John, and they all set out to look for Don and Doctor Smith. Poor Don is tied up, being questioned by the robot guard and the computer. Phanzig discovers the time lapse clocks have all been frozen and he orders Smith to help him free the other prisoners. Once free, the prisoners riot, forming a mob and rushing to the central control room.

When they arrive, they find Will, Don and John in the control room already. Phanzig says they are taking over the ship, and plan on destroying the computer and its time lapse clock. John talks some sense into them, managing to convince the prisoners to let him repair the clock instead. Once the clock is fixed, the computer announces that the prisoners are all free and will be taken back to their home planet. Phanzig and the prisoners are all very happy, and the Robinsons collect the spare parts they need and go back to the Jupiter 2.

Background informationEdit This is the first episode of the the third and final season. The Robinsons have been trying to lift off for a huge amount of time, and yet somehow do it here at the slightest notice. Comets are not hot. This misunderstanding of the laws of physics also complicated The Derelict. Comets are also relatively light compared to planets. Halley's Comet is only one ten-billionth the mass of the Earth. If the Jupiter 2 can lift off and get away from the planet it should have not a problem evading the gravity pull of a comet. This is the first episode of the third season, and there were numerous changes between this and the previous seasons. Everyone has new costumes, with the men's outfits having a more unifying theme. The opening credits were redesigned to reflect the intent of establishing an action/adventure tone. To begin with, the teaser would end on a freeze frame, then the screen would be filled with a countdown from 7 to 1, which would then lead into a new opening credit sequence and theme. This was meant to prepare the audience for a more action/adventure based series. This is the first appearance of the lighter, stunt Robot used for more complicated scenes. It should be noted that this second Robot was referred to as the Dummy Robot on all original series paperwork. In the first scene, the sand is missing from the floor of the set. This was removed to facilitate the filming of the spacewalk scene. Marcel Hillaire would coincidentally return in the final episode of the season (and series), Junkyard In Space. Several of the frozen prisoners are seen moving on their freezing pedestals. The prison ship "Verah Castle" is a modified re-use of the alien spacecraft model from the first season episode The Derelict. Since a comet is heading for the Robinson’s planet, it will most likely be destroyed. In order to save themselves, the Robinsons blast off in the Jupiter 2 and head elsewhere. What happened to the other citizens of that planet, such as Tiabo whom we met in the episode “Forbidden World”? Did the Robinsons give them warning to evacuate as well, or were they just left behind to die? One only needs to glance at the frozen prisoners to know they are dangerous men. Is Doctor Smith really stupid enough to unthaw a murderer just to play a string game with him? Apparently he is! Why were the prisoners allowed to keep their weapons? When Will, Smith and Robot leave the Jupiter 2 to explore the prison ship, how did the Robot climb down that tiny ladder? The spare parts Don and John find on the prison ship are obviously alien technology. How can they be so sure alien parts will work in an earth-made ship? Phanzig gives Will his strangling-rope as a gift, and Will is thrilled! When Will and Dr. Smith look in the first window,the prisoner can be seen opening and closing his hand. In the ViewMaster version of this episode, the accompanying story booklet has John use an electro-magnet to retrieve the Robot and get it into the ship before the nova explode s.

Fort Rhandark One. Fort Rhandark Two. Fort Rhandark Three. Fort Rhandark Four. Fort Rhandark Five. Fort Rhandark Six.

Fort Rhandark Seven. Fort Rhandark Eight. Fort Rhandark Nine. Fort Rhandark Ten. Fort Rhandark Eleven. Fort Rhandark Twelve.

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Fort Rhandark Twenty Fort Rhandark Twenty One. Fort Rhandark Twenty Two. Fort Rhandark Twenty Three. Fort Rhandark Twenty Four. Fort Rhandark Twenty Five. Fort Rhandark Twenty Six.

Fort Rhandark Twenty Seven. Fort Rhandark Twenty Eight. Fort Rhandark Twenty Nine.


Fort Rhandark Eight. Fort Rhandark Nine. Fort Rhandark Ten. Fort Rhandark Eleven. Fort Rhandark Twelve.


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Gallery Official Name Survival Zone Location Details Universe Earth-One First appearance Last appearance Action Comics #309 (February, 1964) Action Comics #310 (March, 1964)

History A pocket dimension with properties similar to the Phantom Zone.

Zor-El and his wife Allura survived the destruction of Argo City in the Survival Zone. They were later reunited with their daughter, Supergirl, and went to live in the Bottle City of Kandor.

Residents Zor-El Allura


5th Dimension


Dreamwatchers,Ink.


Virtual Reality


Simulated Reality Open main menu Wikipedia Search Wikipedia 5 EditWatch this page Read in another language Simulated reality Not to be confused with Virtual reality. Learn moreThis article needs additional citations for verification. Simulated reality is the hypothesis that reality could be simulated—for example by quantum computer simulation—to a degree indistinguishable from "true" reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality; participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience. Simulated reality, by contrast, would be hard or impossible to separate from "true" reality. There has been much debate over this topic, ranging from philosophical discourse to practical applications in computing.

Contents Arguments Edit Simulation argument Edit Main article: Simulation hypothesis A version of the simulation hypothesis was first theorised as a part of a philosophical argument on the part of René Descartes, and later by Hans Moravec.[1][2][3] The philosopher Nick Bostrom developed an expanded argument examining the probability of our reality being a simulation.[4] His argument states that at least one of the following statements is very likely to be true:

1. Human civilization or a comparable civilization is unlikely to reach a level of technological maturity capable of producing simulated realities or such simulations are physically impossible to construct.[4] 2. A comparable civilization reaching aforementioned technological status will likely not produce a significant number of simulated realities (one that might push the probable existence of digital entities beyond the probable number of "real" entities in a Universe) for any of a number of reasons, such as diversion of computational processing power for other tasks, ethical considerations of holding entities captive in simulated realities, etc.[4] 3. Any entities with our general set of experiences are almost certainly living in a simulation.[4] 4. We are living in a reality in which posthumans have not developed yet and we are actually living in reality.[4] Bostrom's argument rests on the premise that given sufficiently advanced technology, it is possible to represent the populated surface of the Earth without recourse to digital physics; that the qualia experienced by a simulated consciousness are comparable or equivalent to those of a naturally occurring human consciousness, and that one or more levels of simulation within simulations would be feasible given only a modest expenditure of computational resources in the real world.[4]

If one assumes first that humans will not be destroyed nor destroy themselves before developing such a technology, and that human descendants will have no overriding legal restrictions or moral compunctions against simulating biospheres or their own historical biosphere, then, Bostrom argues, it would be unreasonable to count ourselves among the small minority of genuine organisms who, sooner or later, will be vastly outnumbered by artificial simulations.[4]

Epistemologically, it is not impossible to tell whether we are living in a simulation. For example, Bostrom suggests that a window could pop up saying: "You are living in a simulation. Click here for more information." However, imperfections in a simulated environment might be difficult for the native inhabitants to identify and for purposes of authenticity, even the simulated memory of a blatant revelation might be purged programmatically. Nonetheless, should any evidence come to light, either for or against the skeptical hypothesis, it would radically alter the aforementioned probability.[4]

Computationalism Edit Main articles: Computationalism and Mathematical universe hypothesis Computationalism is a philosophy of mind theory stating that cognition is a form of computation. It is relevant to the Simulation hypothesis in that it illustrates how a simulation could contain conscious subjects, as required by a "virtual people" simulation. For example, it is well known that physical systems can be simulated to some degree of accuracy. If computationalism is correct and if there is no problem in generating artificial consciousness or cognition, it would establish the theoretical possibility of a simulated reality. Nevertheless, the relationship between cognition and phenomenal qualia of consciousness is disputed. It is possible that consciousness requires a vital substrate that a computer cannot provide and that simulated people, while behaving appropriately, would be philosophical zombies. This would undermine Nick Bostrom's simulation argument; we cannot be a simulated consciousness, if consciousness, as we know it, cannot be simulated. The skeptical hypothesis remains intact, however, and we could still be envatted brains, existing as conscious beings within a simulated environment, even if consciousness cannot be simulated. It has been suggested that whereas virtual reality would enable a participant to experience only three senses (sight, sound and optionally smell), simulated reality would enable all five (including taste and touch).[citation needed]

Some theorists[5][6] have argued that if the "consciousness-is-computation" version of computationalism and mathematical realism (or radical mathematical Platonism)[7] are true then consciousnesses is computation, which in principle is platform independent and thus admits of simulation. This argument states that a "Platonic realm" or ultimate ensemble would contain every algorithm, including those which implement consciousness. Hans Moravec has explored the simulation hypothesis and has argued for a kind of mathematical Platonism according to which every object (including, for example, a stone) can be regarded as implementing every possible computation.[1]

Dreaming Edit Further information: Dream argument A dream could be considered a type of simulation capable of fooling someone who is asleep. As a result, the "dream hypothesis" cannot be ruled out, although it has been argued that common sense and considerations of simplicity rule against it.[8] One of the first philosophers to question the distinction between reality and dreams was Zhuangzi, a Chinese philosopher from the 4th century BC. He phrased the problem as the well-known "Butterfly Dream," which went as follows:

Once Zhuangzi dreamt he was a butterfly, a butterfly flitting and fluttering around, happy with himself and doing as he pleased. He didn't know he was Zhuangzi. Suddenly he woke up and there he was, solid and unmistakable Zhuangzi. But he didn't know if he was Zhuangzi who had dreamt he was a butterfly or a butterfly dreaming he was Zhuangzi. Between Zhuangzi and a butterfly there must be some distinction! This is called the Transformation of Things. (2, tr. Burton Watson 1968:49)

The philosophical underpinnings of this argument are also brought up by Descartes, who was one of the first Western philosophers to do so. In Meditations on First Philosophy, he states "... there are no certain indications by which we may clearly distinguish wakefulness from sleep",[9] and goes on to conclude that "It is possible that I am dreaming right now and that all of my perceptions are false".[9]

Chalmers (2003) discusses the dream hypothesis and notes that this comes in two distinct forms:

that he is currently dreaming, in which case many of his beliefs about the world are incorrect; that he has always been dreaming, in which case the objects he perceives actually exist, albeit in his imagination.[10] Both the dream argument and the simulation hypothesis can be regarded as skeptical hypotheses; however in raising these doubts, just as Descartes noted that his own thinking led him to be convinced of his own existence, the existence of the argument itself is testament to the possibility of its own truth. Another state of mind in which some argue an individual's perceptions have no physical basis in the real world is called psychosis though psychosis may have a physical basis in the real world and explanations vary.

The dream hypothesis is also used to develop other philosophical concepts, such as Valberg's personal horizon: what this world would be internal to if this were all a dream.[11]

Nested simulations Edit The existence of simulated reality is unprovable in any concrete sense: any "evidence" that is directly observed could be another simulation itself. In other words, there is an infinite regress problem with the argument. Even if we are a simulated reality, there is no way to be sure the beings running the simulation are not themselves a simulation and the operators of that simulation are not a simulation.[12]

"Recursive simulation involves a simulation or an entity in the simulation, creating another instance of the same simulation, running it and using its results" (Pooch and Sullivan 2000).[13]

Other uses of the simulation hypothesis in philosophy Edit Besides attempting to assess whether the simulation hypothesis is true or false, philosophers have also used it to illustrate other philosophical problems, especially in metaphysics and epistemology. David Chalmers has argued that simulated beings might wonder whether their mental lives are governed by the physics of their environment, when in fact these mental lives are simulated separately (and are thus, in fact, not governed by the simulated physics).[14] They might eventually find that their thoughts fail to be physically caused. Chalmers argues that this means that Cartesian dualism is not necessarily as problematic of a philosophical view as is commonly supposed, though he does not endorse it.

Similarly, Vincent Conitzer has used the following computer simulation scenarios to illuminate further facts—facts that do not follow logically from the physical facts—about qualia (what it is like to have specific experiences), indexicality (what time it is now and who I am), and personal identity.[15] Imagine a person in the real world who is observing a simulated world on a screen, from the perspective of one of the simulated agents in it. (This is not the kind of simulated reality that is the topic of this article, but we will get to such a simulated reality in the next step of the argument.) The person observing knows that besides the code responsible for the physics of the simulation, there must be additional code that determines in which colors the simulation is displayed on the screen, and which agent's perspective is displayed. (These questions are related to the inverted spectrum scenario and whether there are further facts about personal identity.) That is, the person can conclude that the facts about the physics of the simulation (which are completely captured by the code governing the physics) do not fully determine her experience by themselves. But then, Conitzer argues, imagine someone who has become so engrossed in the simulation that she has forgotten that it is a simulation she is watching. For this to be the case, the simulation needs to have an exceptionally high fidelity, bringing us into the territory of simulated reality. (This situation also resembles the one in the dream argument discussed above.) In this case, could she not still reach the same conclusion that the facts about the physics (of the simulated reality, though she does not realize it is simulated) do not fully determine her experience by themselves? And if so, can we not conclude the same in our own daily lives?

In fiction Edit Main article: Simulated reality in fiction Simulated reality in fiction has been explored by many authors, game designers and film directors.

See also Edit Artificial life Artificial society Augmented reality Boltzmann brain Computational sociology Consensus reality Digital philosophy Digital physics Hyperreality Margolus–Levitin theorem Metaverse Mind uploading OpenWorm, project to simulate the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. Philosophy of information Simulation hypothesis Social simulation Theory of knowledge Tipler's "Omega point" Virtual reality simulator Virtual worlds Major contributing thinkers Edit Nick Bostrom and his simulation argument René Descartes (1596–1650) and his Evil Demon, sometimes also called his 'Evil Genius'[16] George Berkeley (1685–1753) and his "immaterialism" (later referred to as subjective idealism by others)[citation needed] Plato (424/423 BC – 348/347 BC) and his Allegory of the Cave Zhuangzi (around the 4th century BCE) and his Chinese Butterfly Dream References Edit

Moravec, Hans, Simulation, Consciousness, Existence
Moravec, Hans, Platt, Charles Superhumanism
Moravec, Hans Pigs in Cyberspace
Bostrom, Nick (2003). "Are You Living in a Computer Simulation?". Philosophical Quarterly. 53 (211): 243–255.
Bruno Marchal
Russel Standish
Hut, P.; Alford, M.; Tegmark, M. (2006). "On Math, Matter and Mind". Foundations of Physics. 36 (6): 765–794. arXiv:physics/0510188. Bibcode:2006FoPh...36..765H. doi:10.1007/s10701-006-9048-x.
"There is no logical impossibility in the supposition that the whole of life is a dream, in which we ourselves create all the objects that come before us. But although this is not logically impossible, there is no reason whatever to suppose that it is true; and it is, in fact, a less simple hypothesis, viewed as a means of accounting for the facts of our own life, than the common-sense hypothesis that there really are objects independent of us, whose action on us causes our sensations." Bertrand Russell, The Problems of Philosophy
René Descartes, Meditations on the First Philosophy, from Descartes, The Philosophical Works of Descartes, trans. Elizabeth S. Haldane and G.R.T. Ross (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1911 – reprinted with corrections 1931), Volume I, 145-46.
Chalmers, J., The Matrix as Metaphysics, Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona
Valberg, J.J. (2007). Dream, Death, and the Self. Princeton University Press. ISBN 9780691128597.
Bostrom, Nick (2009). "The Simulation Argument: Some Explanations" (PDF). If each first-level ancestor-simulation run by the non-Sims requires more resources (because they contain within themselves additional second-level ancestor-simulations run by the Sims), the non-Sims might well respond by producing fewer first-level ancestor-simulations. Conversely, the cheaper it is for the non-Sims to run a simulation, the more simulations they may run. It is therefore unclear whether the total number of ancestor-simulations would be greater if Sims run ancestor-simulations than if they do not.
Pooch, U.W.; Sullivan, F.J. (2000). Recursive simulation to aid models of decisionmaking. Simulation Conference. 1 (Winter ed.). p. 958. doi:10.1109/WSC.2000.899898. ISBN 978-0-7803-6579-7.
Chalmers, David (January 1990). "How Cartesian Dualism Might Have Been True".
Conitzer, Vincent (2018). "A Puzzle about Further Facts". Erkenntnis. arXiv:1802.01161. doi:10.1007/s10670-018-9979-6.
Chalmers, David (2005). "The Matrix as Metaphysics". In C. Grau. Philosophers Explore the Matrix. Oxford University Press. pp. 157–158. ISBN 9780195181067. LCCN 2004059977. Evil Genius Hypothesis: I have a disembodied mind and an evil genius is feeding me sensory inputs to give the appearance of an external world. This is René Descartes’s classical skeptical hypothesis... Dream Hypothesis: I am now and have always been dreaming. Descartes raised the question: how do you know that you are not currently dreaming? Morpheus raises a similar question: 'Have you ever had a dream, Neo, that you were so sure was real. What if you were unable to wake from that dream? How would you know the difference between the dream world and the real world?'... I think this case is analogous to the Evil Genius Hypothesis: it's just that the role of the “evil genius” is played by a part of my own cognitive system! If my dream-generating system simulates all of space-time, we have something like the original Matrix Hypothesis. p.22

Bibliography Edit Copleston, Frederick (1993) [1946]. "XIX Theory of Knowledge". A History of Philosophy, Volume I: Greece and Rome. New York: Image Books (Doubleday). p. 160. ISBN 978-0-385-46843-5. Copleston, Frederick (1994) [1960]. "II Descartes (I)". A History of Philosophy, Volume IV: Modern Philosophy. New York: Image Books (Doubleday). p. 86. ISBN 978-0-385-47041-4. Deutsch, David (1997). The Fabric of Reality. London: Penguin Science (Allen Lane). ISBN 978-0-14-014690-5. Lloyd, Seth (2006). Programming the Universe: A Quantum Computer Scientist Takes On the Cosmos. Knopf. ISBN 978-1-4000-4092-6. Tipler, Frank (1994). The Physics of Immortality. Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-46799-5. Lem, Stanislaw (1964). Summa Technologiae. ISBN 978-3-518-37178-7. External links Edit Megaminds, abstract evolution and the consistency machine, aka how to build simulated realities Talk Last edited 1 month ago by Citation bot Wikipedia Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted. Terms of UsePrivacyDesktop

Is Our Entire Universe Just a Simulated Reality? FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedIn Are we living in a computer simulation? Is everything in our universe — from the smallest atom to the largest galaxy — nothing more than a computer science project on some omnipotent being’s hard drive? At first glance, the notion of simulated reality seems ludicrous, but consider advances humankind has already made in computer gaming, virtual reality and robotics. Are we inadvertently strengthening the case for simulation theory?

The Simulation Argument Also called the simulation hypothesis, the argument here is simple: All reality is actually an artificial simulation, most likely one run by an advanced supercomputer.

In just a few short decades, innovators have developed devices with the capacity to learn and mimic many basic characteristics of human intelligence. If computing power continues to increase along its existing trajectory, it’s possible future humans (or other intelligent life) could easily create a simulated reality.

Support for Simulation Theory Several well-known scientists and pioneers have expressed their support for simulation theory. As noted by Scientific American, during the 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate, scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson said the odds of our universe as simulated reality were 50-50. He pointed to the large intelligence gap between chimpanzees and humans despite our 98 percent DNA overlap, arguing that a creature many times our intelligence could both exist and potentially run simulations.

Other arguments for simulation theory come from philosopher Nick Bostrum and theoretical physicist James Gates. In 2003, Bostrum suggested that advanced civilizations with massive computing power might decide to run simulations of their ancestors — us — and, given the sophistication of the technology, we wouldn’t know that we’re nothing more than computer programs. Gates, meanwhile, found “error-correcting codes” — similar in principle to those used in Web browsers — while studying equations about electrons and quarks, said Scientific American. Even more concerning if you’re worried about a simulated universe? It’s almost impossible to prove we’re in a real universe because any “evidence” could be part of the program.

Evidence of a “Real” Existence? Despite solid philosophical and theoretical arguments, a team from Oxford University has found reasonably solid evidence that our universe is more than a mobile application. The proof? Attempting to model specific quantum phenomena such as the Hall effect quickly gets out of hand — according to Cosmos, modeling just a few hundred electrons using the quantum Monte Carlo technique requires more atoms than exist in the universe. As noted by Fast Company, storing just 20 spins of one particle using this model would require one terabyte of RAM.

The Nature of Reality So what happens if we’re living in a simulation? Some experts theorize that as the program continues to run, problems will emerge — glitches in the matrix, so to speak. Consider the 2017 Oscars gaffe, when old-Hollywood musical “La La Land” was mistakenly given the award for best picture. Cast and crew arrived on stage to deliver their speeches while chaos ensued behind the scenes, culminating in a mea culpa that announced the real winner: “Moonlight.”

What does this say about simulation theory? According to The New Yorker, some philosophers — such as David Chalmers of NYU — suggest that increasingly bizarre events in the “real” world may be evidence that our universe is someone else’s simulation. Beyond simulations, these events may represent divergent “points” in reality; in another universe the mix-up didn’t happen. In another reality, “La La Land” actually won.

Every choice, no matter how minuscule, could create its own universe. Another option is multiverse theory, where our universe is just one of many with its own set of physical laws and properties. And what’s more simulation-like than running multiple instances of something to see which one works best?

Mind Over Matter From the standpoint of human existence and the quest for a greater understanding of the universe, this simulation debate is largely academic. We’re still seemingly gifted with free will, have the power to investigate our own reality and discover what (if any) fundamental scientific truths emerge. If we’re nothing but a simulation, the outcome of our efforts may change but this doesn’t lessen their impact.

Is This Real Life? Is This Just Fantasy? Maybe Queen asked the right question in “Bohemian Rhapsody” — is life just fantasy? While strange happenings and the oddly ordered nature of fundamental mathematics points to the possibility of a computer-generated existence, recent quantum research suggests a universe too complex for simulation.


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Contents[hide] Seraphian or Seraphean Protector Lords Depiction Beings of Light From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guide Ship of Lights From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guide Publication history Powers and abilities Overview and Attitude Weapons and equipment Armor Zauriel's Sword (Flaming Sword) The Aerie Michael's battle spear Important Storylines and Significant Appearances Known angels [edit] References Known groups of Angels Fallen angels Possible angels References Seraphian or Seraphean Protector LordsEdit Seraphean Star Ship HMS Gabriel's Flight FotoFlexer Photo. Seraphean Star Ship

The Protector Lords-are a fictional term given the Seraphians or Serapheans or Seraphs,as they are sometimes called."Seraphim", literally "burning ones", is the plural of "seraph", more properly sarap.s one of a class of celestial beings mentioned the Great Book of Time.The Seraphs or were thought of as noncorporeal race of sentient holographical lifeforms or photonic lifeforms.Photonic lifeforms (also called photonics) are any form of sentient life based on particles of light and energy. While some photonic lifeforms are naturally occurring, most encounters have been with artificially-created holograms.Seraphians exist between the normal multiverse and reflected holographic space or holo space.

Holospace

In a holographic universe, even time and space could no longer be viewed as fundamentals. Because concepts such as location break down in a universe in which nothing is truly separate from anything else, time and three-dimensional space, like the images of the fish on the TV monitors, would also have to be viewed as projections of this deeper order. At its deeper level reality is a sort of superhologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the superholographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past. What else the superhologram contains is an open-ended question. Allowing, for the sake of argument, that the superhologram is the matrix that has given birth to everything in our universe, at the very least it contains every subatomic particle that has been or will be -- every configuration of matter and energy that is possible, from snowflakes to quasars, from blue whales to gamma rays. It must be seen as a sort of cosmic storehouse of "All That Is."At its deeper level reality is a sort of super hologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the super holographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past.

he "abalim" or "arelim"/"erelim".[3] The Ophanim (Wheels or Galgallin) is a different class of higher liberated celestial beings, under many Christian angelic hierarchiesAn Ophan (Lat. ophan[us], pl. ophani[m] from Hebrew אְוּפַּנים) is one of a class of celestial beings called Ophanim described in the Book of Enoch[1] with the Cherubim and Seraphim as never sleeping, but watching (or guarding) the throne of God.Empyrean,

Malachim (translation: messengers), general word for angel Michael (translation: who is like God), performs God's kindness Gabriel (translation: the strength of God), performs acts of justice and power Raphael (translation: God Heals), God's healing force Uriel (translation: God is my light), leads us to destiny Seraphim (translation: the burning ones), protects the gates to the Garden of Eden Malach HaMavet (translation: the angel of death) HaSatan (translation: the prosecutor), brings people's sins before them in the heavenly court Chayot HaKodesh (translation: the holy beasts) Ophanim (translation: arbits) Astrological Influence HaMerkavah (translation: the chariot), transports God's glory Vilon (וילון), [http://bibref.hebtools.com/?book=%20Isa&verse=40:22&src=KJV ]

Raki'a (רקיע), [http://bibref.hebtools.com/?book=%20Gen&verse=1:17&src=KJV ]

Shehaqim (שחקים), Zebul (זבול), See ([http://bibref.hebtools.com/?book=I%20Kings&verse=8:13&src=KJV ]

Ma'on (מעון), [http://bibref.hebtools.com/?book=%20Ps&verse=42:9&src=KJV ]

Machon (מכון), See (1 Kings 7:30, Deut 28:12) Araboth (ערבות), The seventh Heaven where ofanim, the seraphim, and the hayyoth and the throne of the Lord are located. The Jewish Merkavah an

1.Firdaus (the highest)

2.‘Adn

3.Na’iim

4.Na’wa

5.Darussalaam

6.Daarul Muaqaamah

7.Al-Muqqamul Amin

8.Khuldi (the lowest)

Thrones/Ophanim (Gr. thronoi)

Chayot Ha Kodesh 2 Ophanim 3 Erelim See Isaiah 33:7 4 Hashmallim See Ezekiel 1:4 5 Seraphim See Isaiah 6 6 Malakhim Messengers, angels 7 Elohim "Godly beings" 8 Bene Elohim "Sons of Godly beings" 9 Cherubim See Talmud Hagigah 13b 10 Ishim Chayot Ha Kadesh Living Ones Metatron Keter 2 Ophanim Wheels Raziel Chokmah 3 Erelim Thrones Tzaphkiel Binah 4 Hashmallim Brilliant Ones Tzadkiel Chesed 5 Seraphim Fiery Serpents Khamael Gevurah 6 Malakhim Messengers, angels Raphael Tipheret 7 Elohim Godly Beings Haniel Netzach 8 Bene Elohim Sons of Godly Beings Michael Hod 9 Cherubim Strong Ones Gabriel Yesod 10 Ishim Souls of Fire Sandalphon Ma The Angels, malakhim (messengers or angels), are the lowest order of the angels, and the most recognized. They are the ones most concerned with the affairs of living things. Within the category of the angels, there are many different kinds, with different functions. The angels are sent as messengers to mankind.

DepictionEdit Seraphians or Serapheans are wingled angelic Holographic beingse a humanoid race, about 6' on average, they had slender bodies, gold-green skin, purple hair and eyes that ranged from silvery blue to red, with white visible pupils or irises. , traveling in a large spacecraft most commonly referred to as the Ship of Lights,also known as Seraphean Light Ships. The Serapheans are the same angelic "Beings of Light" mentioned in "The Book of the Word", the dominant Colonial Alliance Scripture, and that these beings have played a part in human society.Ships of Light - The ships are vessels controlled by friendly figures with angelic personage,known as Serapheans,have apart of the Lords of Light interstellar mythology almost since it's beginnings.The Lords of Light are beatified humans or deities,who originated in the so called Old Maveric Universe and maybe that the whole lord of Light term originated with other encounters with the Protector Lords. .

Lights or Stars in the Sky-actually not deities,but three Seraphian Star Ships hovering in orbit day and night watching over the planet from time to time,as cultural observers and mission as Protector Lords of the Multiverve. The Seraphians   goal went from observation simple to the combat evil and create an orderly universe. And they acted quickly on that goal,since many of the space travelling Seraphian were of the Protector Lord/Guardian class-a kind of rapid deployment shock troopers,.

Later came identification of individual angelic messengers: Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, and Uriel. "Seraphs." Seraph (plural: Seraphim) is the Hebrew word for Angel. Later Jewish imagery perceived them as having human form, and in that way they passed into the ranks of Christian angels. In the Christian angelic hierarchy, seraphim represent the highest rank of angels.


The Seraphian Protector Lords are sort of my version of Guardian Angels-The Guardian Angels is a non-profit, international, volunteer organization of unarmed citizen crime patrollers.A guardian angel is an angel assigned to protect and guide a particular person. The belief in guardian angels can be traced throughout all antiquity. The concept of tutelary angels and their hierarchy was extensively d wore white, appeared and disappeared suddenly, and spoke in riddles. Although never stated, it seems likely she was another Being of Light. (More than likely since her name literally means "female angel".)Angela is a female given name. It is derived from the Greek word ángelos (αγγελος), meaning "messenger [1]".

Beings of Light From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guideEdit Jump to: navigation, search[2][3]John, one of the Beings of Light (Experiment in Terra)The Beings of Light are a mysterious race that travel using the Ship of Lights. Called angels by the primitive people on Kobol, these creatures helped them develop the civilization that would become the Twelve Colonies

Apparently mistakes were made in the past by these advanced beings, as they seem reluctant to interfere directly with the Colonials or the Terrans. They help Apollo and battlestar save the Terrans from themselves .

Count Iblis is a fallen member of this race, who has chosen to use his powers for darker purposes

certain Seraphian Protector Lords came to take on a particular significance and developed unique personalities and roles. Though these archangels were believed to have rank amongst the heavenly host, no systematic hierarchy ever developed. Metatron is considered one of the highest of the angels in Merkabah and Kabbalist mysticism and often serves as a scribe. He is briefly mentioned in the Talmud, and figures prominently in Merkabah mystical texts. Michael,

2.1 Adam 2.2 Lilith 2.3 Sachiel 2.4 Shamshel 2.5 Ramiel 2.6 Gaghiel 2.7 Israfel 2.8 Sandalphon 2.9 Matariel 2.10 Sahaquiel 2.11 Iruel 2.12 Leliel 2.13 Bardiel 2.14 Zeruel 2.15 Arael 2.16 Armisael 2.17 Tabris 2.18 Lilim Ship of Lights From Battlestar Wiki, the free, open content Battlestar Galactica encyclopedia and episode guideEdit Jump to: navigation, search[4][5]A Ship of Lights from "War of the Gods"The Ship of Lights is the spacecraft used by the Beings of Light.

The Ship of Lights is an immensely large and fast spacecraft of unknown but highly advanced technology.

Star pilots hear a strange piercing sound as it approaches,that work similar processess as the telepathic banshee whale.. The craft has the ability to render people unconscious, as well as make them disappear

The "vanished" pilots and spacecraft are transported to a different dimension. When returned to their own dimension the warriors' memories have been erased regarding their abduction experience


Popular FictionEdit

Agents are a great aspect for years in many movies,such as It's a Wonderful Life,tv series such as Highway to Heavon and even comic books,such in Angels (Marvel Comics).An angel is a fictional entity within the Marvel Comics universe, based on the angels of the Abrahamic faiths. Their first Marvel Comics appearance was Marvel Tales #133</ref>

  • The Asura, "the assassins of Heaven", played an important role as antagonists in the *Gadriel, one of the Grigori, was tasked with watching over the After the , Gadriel resurrected him and granted him supernatural powers.
  • The archangel Ruth was sent to deal with the renegade demon Kazann when he ran amok on earth, a mission that caused her to clash with Hoss and the

realizes the Seraphs are the same angelic "Beings of Light" mentioned in "The Book of the Word", the dominant Colonial Scripture, and that these beings have played a part in human society.


The Festivus celebration includes three major components: The Festivus Pole - During Festivus, an unadorned aluminum pole is displayed, apparently in opposition to the commercialization of decorated Christmas trees. Mr. Constanza finds “tinsel distracting.” The Airing of Grievances - At the Festivus dinner, the celebrant tells their friends and family all the instances where they disappointed the celebrant that year. The Feats of Strength - The head of the family tests his or her strength against one participant of the head’s choosing. Festivus is not considered over until the head of the family has been pinned. Participants are allowed to decline to attempt to pin the head of the family only if they have something better to do instead.



An angel is a fictional entity within the Marvel Comics universe, based on the angels of the Abrahamic faiths. Their first Marvel Comics appearance was Marvel Tales #133</ref> In the religious text of Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Zoroastriansim, angels are believed to be guardians of mankind and messengers of God; indeed, "angels" originates from the Greek word for messenger. In Hebrew they are mal'ach, (again messenger), Abbir (mighty) or Elohim (Godly beings).

Publication historyEdit Angels are a relatively recent addition to the Marvel Universe - although demons have frequently appeared as villains in some Marvel titles, the comics had avoided featuring angels (or directly mentioning the presence of the Judeo-Christian God) until the 1990s.

Powers and abilitiesEdit The abilities and physical features of angels are widely varied and many seem able to alter their appearance at will, but most favor beautiful humanoid forms with large, birdlike wings growing from their backs.The Seraphians primary power is that of natural flight, due to thier large feathered wings.The Seraphians wings have superhuman strength, and they have a very flexible skeletal structure that enables him to press them to the back of his torso and legs with only the slightest bulge visible under his clothing. The Seraphians bones are hollow, his body processes food more efficiently than a normal human body and does not store any excess fat, and he possesses a greater proportionate muscle mass than normal. As a result, his strength, speed, agility, endurance, reflexes, eyesight, and hearing are at their peak. Elements of The Seraphians anatomy are comparable to those of birds. The Seraphians superhumanly sharp eyes can withstand high-speed winds which would damage the average human eye. Hthey can breathe at high velocities or altitudes, and The Seraphians can cope with the reduced temperatures at high altitudes for prolonged periods of time, giving them a greater-than-normal capacity to endure low temperatures in areas such as the Arctic. The strength in The Seraphians natural wings can easily break a man's arm or leg, or even put someone through a wall.


The Seraphians are immortal and do not age. Most Seraphians seem to have varying degrees of superhuman strength, and they often can fire bolts of heavenly fire from their hands or summon burning swords at will.possesses unlimited telepathy and telekinesis, can also sense good and evil around him and in people.They can make themselves invisible to humans, although rare sensitives may still see them. Many angels can generate illusions and compel humans to obey their will, and some can resurrect the dead by sharing their own divine essence with the deceased. When slain, the Grigori angels spontaneously combusted; whether otherThe Seraphian would likewise is uncertain.

Overview and AttitudeEdit The angels of the Marvel Universe tend to believe that the end justifies the means. When battling the forces of Hell, mortals are sometimes expendable.

Weapons and equipmentEdit ArmorEdit Zauriel has three major pieces of equipment. The first is his Heavenly armor. Although built of Earthly materials, this prototype is designed by the engineers of Heaven and is blessed with divine properties that are theoretically impossible to replicate on Earth. This suit of armor greatly enhances Zauriel's physical properties, including strength, durability, foot speed, agility, flight speed and stamina.

Zauriel's Sword (Flaming Sword)Edit Cast in the foundries of the Fifth Heaven—a creation of Elemental Angelic Fire. It embodies Zauriel's will and can cut through all bonds, dispel shadows and even wound non-material entities.

Zauriel's second piece of equipment is his flaming sword. This sword, which is characteristic of both guardian angels depicted thus far, is directly bonded to Zauriel's will. It is able to emit blasts of holy fire, and because it is controlled by Zauriel's will, the sword can cut literally anything, including otherwise intangible objects and people, and even dimensional fabric itself. Zauriel was once able to cut a hole in the dimensional barrier separating Heaven and Earth when the blade was magically pumped up by teammates, enabling himself and his team to transverse dimensions.

Despite it being a heavenly weapon, Zauriel's sword can be exhausted of power. It has been blown out at least once, but was re-ignited by one of the powers wielded by the then-Supergirl.

The AerieEdit Zauriel's final piece of equipment is his headquarters itself, the Aerie. Floating high over Los Angeles, this shining, golden tower is much like Zauriel's armor in that it is made of Earthly materials but is of Heavenly design. The equipment far surpasses the technology of other humans, even going as far as to supersede the technology within the JLA Watchtower.

Michael's battle spearEdit Zauriel is given this as he joins the Shadowpact, it is said to be more powerful than his Flaming Sword.

Important Storylines and Significant AppearancesEdit The Asura, "the assassins of Heaven", played an important role as antagonists in the Warren Ellis Hellstorm series. Gadriel, one of the Grigori, was tasked with watching over the Punisher. After the Punisher committed suicide, Gadriel resurrected him and granted him supernatural powers. The archangel Ruth was sent to deal with the renegade demon Kazann when he ran amok on earth, a mission that caused her to clash with Hoss and the Ghost Rider. Known angelsEdit Afterlife[1] - became warped after many years on Earth; later became an evil creature in the Afterlife dimension; cured by Doctor Strange Agent of Heaven[2] - member of the Critics who judged Darrel Daniel Andy[3] Angel of Death[4] (Azrael[5]) also known as Lazaer[4], which was an aspect of Azrael the Angel of Death; battled Logan each time his body died to allow his soul to return to his body; eventually helped restore Wolverine's soul in return for killing Phaedra Anielle[6] - also known as The Fallen, the Fallen One, the Heaven-Sent and the Just-Fallen; member of the Ephemera; created with a short lifespan for one specific purpose - to save the souls of Gambit (Remy LeBeau) and the Sister Katrina from the demon Olivier Stoker; mistaken for Hanael and sought by Olivier Stoker; sacrificed herself to save Sister Katrina Arcturus[7] - member of the Council of Thrones. Armaros[8] - member of the Grigori; slaughtered by Oliver and the Stalkers[8] Armaziel[9] - engaged in a chess-like game with Sammael; which represented a literal struggle between the forces of Heaven and Hell Azazel[8] - member of the Grigori; slaughtered by Oliver and the Stalkers[8] Daniel[10] - brother of Malachi Emmael[11] - ally of Vraniel; sought to stop Zadkiel but was killed in battle with Lucifer and Ghost Rider[12] Ephesus[7] - member of the Council of Thrones. Esphares[13] - member of the Grigori; slaughtered by Oliver and the Stalkers[13] Esther[14] - Archangel of great power; sister of Ruth Ezekeel[8] - member of the Grigori and Patron Saint of Addiction; slaughtered by Oliver and the Stalkers[8] Gabriel Gadriel Golden Angel Lusa Gregor Hafaza Izadquiel Jodyquiel Metatron Harry Moran Ruth Sansenoy Sariel Semangol Senoy Shamhazai Spirit of Christmas Tariel Thrasher Todyquiel Tzadquiel Uriel Vraniel Zachariah Zadkiel The Seraphean or Seraphian Watchers (from Greek egrḗgoroi (ἐγρήγοροι)) or Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with human females, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim (the Nephilim are also mentioned in Genesis 6:4, but that verse notably lacks mention of them being human-angel hybrids) Araqiel (also Arakiel, Araqael, Araciel, Arqael, Sarquael, Arkiel, Arkas) Sibylline Oracles, Araqiel is referred to not as a fallen angel, or Watcher, but as one of the 5 angels who lead the souls of men to judgement, the other 4 being Ramiel, Uriel, Samiel, and Azazel. Armaros (also Amaros) in Enoch I taught men the resolving of enchantments. Azazel[9] taught men to make knives, swords, shields, and how to devise ornaments and cosmetics. Gadriel taught the art of cosmetics. Baraqel (Baraqiel) taught men astrology[10] Bezaliel mentioned in Enoch I, left out of most translations due to damaged manuscripts and problematic transmission of the text. Chazaqiel (sometimes Ezeqeel) taught men the signs of the clouds (meteorology).[8] Kokabiel (also Kakabel, Kochbiel, Kokbiel, Kabaiel, and Kochab),[11], is a high-ranking, holy angel but, in general apocryphal lore and also in Enoch I, he is a fallen Watcher, resident of nether realms, and commands 365,000 surrogate spirits to do his bidding. Among other duties, he instructs his fellows in astrology. Penemue[12] "taught mankind the art of writing with ink and paper," and taught "the children of men the bitter and the sweet and the secrets of wisdom." Sariel (also Suriel) taught mankind about the courses of the moon (at one time regarded as forbidden knowledge).[13] Samyaza (also Shemyazaz, Shamazya, Semiaza, Shemhazi, Semyaza and Amezyarak) is one of the leaders of the fall from heaven.[14] Shamsiel, once a guardian of Eden,[15] served as one of the 2 chief aides to the archangel Uriel (the other aide being Hasdiel) when Uriel bore his standard into battle, and is the head of 365 legions of angels and also crowns prayers, accompanying them to the 5th heaven. He is referred to[16] as one of the Watchers. He is a fallen angel who teaches the signs of the sun.[17] [edit] ReferencesEdit Known groups of AngelsEdit Asura Council of Thrones Grigori Religion as Replacement for Thought Coalition Fallen angelsEdit Asmodeus[15] - fallen angel/demon subservient to Mephisto; served by Mount Avarice, Rzh’Arr, Saturnine, Tabicantra, V’Zarr, Yammuz and Yukthalok; apparently destroyed by Mephisto after a series of failed schemes to obtain the soul of Ghost Rider (Johnny Blaze). Beelzeboul[16] - father of Hellfire; had a pact granting immortality to Roger Barbatos Lilith (Bat Zuge or Kiskillilla)[17] - ancient Sumerian goddess and alleged first wife of Adam; apparently degenerated into a demon sorceress; former ally of Centurious and Zarathos; mother of the Liln. Lucifer[18] - led an army that repulsed the N'Garai from Heaven prior to his fall; led 13 other demons/fallen angels against Heaven and was cast down into Hell; escaped to Earth by Ghost Rider where his essence was split into 666 corpses; later possessed the body of Jack O'Lantern (Steve Levins) but was sent back to Hell by Ghost Rider & Dixie Malachi[10] - brother of Daniel & Micah; retained alliance with Micah after he was cast down from Hell and became Kazann; freed Ghost Rider from Hell to defeat Kazann; exposed and cast down into Hell where Ghost Rider dragged him along to be tortured nightly by the demons of Hell. Micah[19] - later became known as Kazann[10] - former archangel and brother of Malachi; rebelled alongside Lucifer and was cast into Hell; escaped to Earth with the aid of Earl Gustav but sent back to Hell by Ghost Rider & Malachi Olivier[13] - former archangel who sided with Lucifer; had his memories and abilities removed and placed in the human form of Frank Costa[20]; returned to power from the deaths generated by Punisher and later attempted to takeover all realms of Hell; slaughtered the Grigori but was attacked by demons of Hell he thought defeated and trapped in hell by Gadriel Pazuzu (Imdugud)[21] - demon who protected humans against plague and evil forces; worshipped in Mesopotamia by priestesses of Pazzuzu; created the Doucheblade which empowered Vicki of Humbabu, Hatshesut of Egypt, Hippolyte, Joan of Arc, Jane Austen, Queen Victoria, Eleanor Roosevelt, Suzi Pazuzo and Howard the Duck; possibly an ally of Lucifer and formerly part of Satan's court; released upon his "death" and later summoned to Earth through the body of Seth Walker by Louis Childs; when he killed Louis Childs he was banished by Magik (Amanda Sefton) Sammael/Samael[22] - engaged in a chess-like game with Armaziel which represented a literal struggle between the forces of Heaven and Hell VrabielTemplate:Issue XaphanTemplate:Issue Possible angelsEdit ReferencesEdit ↑ Dr. Strange vol. 3 #89 ↑ Man-Thing #5 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 2 #41 ↑ 4.0 4.1 Wolverine vol. 3 #48 ↑ Wolverine vol. 3 #58 ↑ Gambit vol. 2 #1 ↑ 7.0 7.1 Wolverine/Punisher: Revelations #1 ↑ 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 Punisher vol. 4 #3 ↑ Hellstorm #7 ↑ 10.0 10.1 10.2 Ghost Rider vol. 5 #1 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 4 #14 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 4 #18 ↑ 13.0 13.1 13.2 Punisher vol. 4 #1 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 5 #2 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 2 #53 ↑ Terror Inc #1 ↑ Vampire Tales #4 ↑ Marvel Preview #7 ↑ Ghost Rider vol. 5 #6 ↑ Marvel Super-Action #1 ↑ Howard the Duck vol. 3 #3 ↑ Hellstorm #7 Categories: Mythology in comics Marvel Comics angels Judeo-Christian mythology in comics Add category Recent Wiki Activity General Delvin Shaitanus DocThompson1 • 4 days ago Atlantis-Prime DocThompson1 • 4 days ago Prince Nicholas Gideon Sarkhon DocThompson1 • 4 days ago Doctor Arion Brandu Sarkhon DocThompson1 • 4 days ago Popular Pages The Best Ways ‘Gotham’ Has Changed Batman’s Origin The Best Ways ‘Gotham’ Has Changed Batman’s Origin

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Island Three The O'Neill cylinder


Star Blazers

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Sym

Holo Species are any type of classified holographic lifeform,such as Seraphean,Djinn,Phantoms,Holo ghost,Holo god,Holo spirit,Wraif, Seraphean

Djinn are a type of corrupt,often mischievous Seraphean.

Phantoms are a type of corrupt,often mischievous Seraphean.Holo Phantoms are often neither bad not good,but aloof and mysterious.

Holo Spirit are a type of Holographic Life Form,based on an actual once living being of middle power status.

Holo ghost are a type of Holographic Life Form,based on an actual once living being of lower power status. Holo god,are a type of Holographic Life Form,based on an actual once living being of higher power status.Holographic Gods are the highest status of Holographic Space Spirit.

Holo Lord are a type of Holographic Life Form,based on an actual once living being of higher power status.Holo Lord's are often Holo Spirits of status below a Holo Space God.

Holo Wraif,are a type of Holographic Life Form,based on an actual once living being of lower power status,bound to a specific Holo God of Lord.


Inception

Terran Federation

Tauron Empire- Seven Empires of Atlantis-

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