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Klaatu barada nikto." ―Klaatu's phrase used to stop Gort. Home | Movies | Mars Attacks Banner logo Wiki Loves Monuments: The world's largest photography competition is now open! Photograph a historic site, learn more about our history, and win prizes. Open main menu Wikipedia Search Wikipedia 6 EditWatch this page Read in another language Klaatu The Day the Earth Stood Still  Page issues Klaatu (pronounced “klahtú”) is a fictional humanoid alien in the 1951 science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still and its 2008 remake. Klaatu is famous in part because of the phrase “Klaatu barada nikto!” used in the classic film and its re-use in the Bruce Campbell cult comedy film Army of Darkness, as well as many other films.

Klaatu The Day the Earth Stood Still character Klaatu.JPG Klaatu presenting a gift First appearance "Farewell to the Master" Created by Harry Bates Portrayed by Michael Rennie (1951) Keanu Reeves (2008) Information Aliases Mr. Carpenter Species Humanoid Alien Gender Male

Klaatu departing Michael Rennie as Klaatu Edit Klaatu (Michael Rennie) arrives in a flying saucer in Washington, DC, accompanied by Gort (Lock Martin), as a peaceful ambassador from an extraterrestrial confederation; but when he presents a harmless device as "a gift for [the American] President... to study life on other planets", his intentions are misinterpreted by one of the soldiers that form his welcoming committee, who shoots him. To protect Klaatu, Gort destroys the surrounding artillery.

Klaatu is taken to a hospital, where he quickly recovers. On learning that the government does not expect other nations to be willing to meet him, he takes residence in a boarding house, using the surname "Carpenter", the name found on the clothes and suitcase obtained by himself at the hospital, and befriends Bobby Benson (Billy Gray), a boy who stays there with his widowed mother, Helen Benson (Patricia Neal), and visits Professor Barnhardt, a brilliant scientist (played by Sam Jaffe). When Klaatu/Carpenter is brought later to him, Barnhardt agrees to summon scientists from all nations, and asks Klaatu for a show of power, thus exhibiting that the extraterrestrial alliance would threaten Earth if Earth threatens the peace in space. Klaatu, in reply, neutralizes electric power all over the world (with some notable exceptions where lives would be endangered as a result, such as hospitals and airplanes in flight) for 30 minutes. Klaatu's action is taken as an act of war. Betrayed by Mrs. Benson's suitor, he is fatally shot by the U.S. Army; whereupon Mrs. Benson, at his behest, delivers the message "Klaatu barada nikto!" barely in time to save her own life. Gort retrieves Klaatu's body, and revives him from death.

Klaatu gives the assembled scientists the following ultimatum: Earth can either join other spacefaring worlds, wherein peace is ensured by a massive deterrent force of robots similar to Gort, or "be reduced to a burned-out cinder". Klaatu then departs.

Keanu Reeves as Klaatu Edit The 2008 remake of The Day the Earth Stood Still features Keanu Reeves in the role of Klaatu and Jennifer Connelly as Helen Benson. While the original Klaatu was simply of a near-human species, in the remake it is stated that Klaatu's biology was radically altered to give him a human form from DNA acquired in 1928. He is captured by the military but escapes with help from Helen. He meets with a man named Mr. Wu (actually another alien of Klaatu's race in disguise) to discuss whether humanity should be destroyed. Klaatu orders smaller spheres—previously hidden on Earth—to remove animal species from the planet (cf. Noah's Ark) and activates Gort to destroy humanity. Gort grows 50 foot destroy s the Early Edition Newspaper cat guy and destroys a oil truck driven by a Trump Supperter. After spending time with Helen and her stepson Jacob, as well as talking with Professor Barnhardt, as disguse the dead parrot,Barthardg pulls out a gun and shoots Klaatu through the head. Klaatu sacrifices his physical form to stop Gort, setting off a massive electromagnetic pulse that disables all electric technology in the world. Yes,so smoth assholes.His spaceship/sphere then departs Earth. Along the way,Keanu Reeves Klaatu encounters Michael Renny Klaatu gets is destroyed. Reeves' Klaatu shows very little emotion, and explains this because Klaatu "is an alien entity contained in a human body, and when he is looking out of that body, he is just looking out."much the actor himself[1] The filmmakers had "decided that in the beginning he should just be very different. That involved having no natural human gestures or behavioral signs but appearing more flat and expressionless. He has a concentrated way of seeing the world."[2] The original Klaatu knew little of Earth, and spent most of the film learning; whereas in the later film, another member of Klaatu's race had been sent to Earth decades earlier.

References Edit" The

The Day the Earth Stood Still: Production Notes". Retrieved 2009-03-06."Keanu

Keanu Reeves Plays Mind Games". Retrieved 2009-03-06. RELATED ARTICLES The Day the Earth Stood Still 1951 US science fiction film directed by Robert Wise

Klaatu barada nikto iconic phrase from The Day the Earth Stood Still

The Day the Earth Stood Still (2008 film) 2008 film by Scott Derrickson

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Cast Michael Rennie as Klaatu Patricia Neal as Helen Benson Billy Gray as Bobby Benson Hugh Marlowe as Tom Stephens Sam Jaffe as Professor Jacob Barnhardt Frances Bavier as Mrs. Barley Lock Martin as Gort Frank Conroy as Mr. Harley Tyler McVey as Brady (uncredited)?

And S.David Wasienkho.

The Day the Earth Stood Still (aka Farewell to the Master and Journey to the World) is a 1951 American black-and-white science fiction film from 20th Century Fox, produced by Julian Blaustein, directed by Robert Wise, and starring Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal, Hugh Marlowe and Sam Jaffe.

The Day the Earth Stood Still was written by Edmund H. North, based on the 1940 science fiction short story "Farewell to the Master" by Harry Bates. The notable score was composed by Bernard Herrmann. GAMES MOVIES TV VIDEO WIKIS Search

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lien Species Alien Species 9,492 PAGES ADD TOPCONTENT COMMUNITY EXPLORE in: Characters, Characters of unknown species, Characters of Unknown Origin, and 5 more Klaatu EDIT SHARE Klaatu Klaatu 2 Biography Information True Identity Klaatu Alias Mr. Carpenter Homeworld Unnamed World Species Unnamed Species Gender Male Age Mid 30's (human appearance) 78 (actual age)

Language English Occupation Ambassador Status Active Behind the Scenes Universe The Day the Earth Stood Still Created by Harry Bates Performed by Michael Rennie (1951) Keanu Reeves (2008) "Klaatu barada nikto." ―Klaatu's phrase used to stop Gort. 1 HistoryEdit 1.1 OriginEdit Klaatu arrives in a Flying Saucer in Washington, DC, wearing a silver spacesuit and accompanied by a large humanoid robot, Gort. Klaatu arrives as a peaceful ambassador from an extraterrestrial confederation, but when he presents a harmless device he is shot by one of the soldiers that form his rather apprehensive welcoming committee. Klaatu explains the device was a gift to the President and could have been used to study life on other planets. To protect Klaatu, Gort vaporizes all of the surrounding weaponry.

Klaatu is taken to a hospital, where he quickly recovers. On learning that the government does not expect other nations to be willing to come to meet him, he goes out to meet the common people, using the surname "Carpenter," the name found on the clothes and suit case he borrows, as a pseudonym. He takes up residence in a boarding house and is shown the town by a young boy named Bobby Benson who stays there with his mother, Helen Benson, and drops by the home of Professor Barnhardt, a brilliant scientist, who is absent.

Klaatu/Carpenter leaves a "calling card" by marking Barnhardt's calculations as a teacher would mark a student's. When Klaatu/Carpenter is brought later by an army driver, Barnhardt discusses the situation with Klaatu, agrees to summon scientists from all nations, and asks Klaatu for a show of power, thus exhibiting that the extraterrestrial alliance controls enormous power that would threaten Earth if Earth threatens the peace in space. Klaatu, in reply, neutralizes electric power all over the world (with some notable exceptions, such as hospitals and airplanes in flight) for 30 minutes. Klaatu's action is taken to be an act of war. Betrayed by Mrs. Benson's boyfriend, he is hunted down and fatally shot.

Because Gort's purpose is to prevent aggression and could "destroy the Earth" if anything untoward happens to him, Klaatu has told Mrs. Benson to deliver the phrase that will cancel the attack. Helen reaches the robot, uttering "Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!" barely in time to save her own life, whereupon Gort aborts his attack, retrieves Klaatu's body, transports him to the saucer, and revives him from death - although Klaatu explains to Helen that this procedure is only temporary.

After Klaatu is revived, he steps out of the saucer, giving the scientists the following ultimatum: Earth can either decide not to threaten aggression on other planets and join other spacefaring worlds—a peace ensured by a massive deterrent force, consisting of robots similar to Gort—or else "this Earth of yours will be reduced to a burned-out cinder". Declaring "the decision lies with you", Klaatu then departs.


2 Keanu Reeves as KlaatuEdit The 2008 remake of The Day the Earth Stood Still features Keanu Reeves in the role of Klaatu and Jennifer Connelly as Helen Benson. While the original Klaatu was simply of a near-human species, in the remake it is stated that Klaatu's race is not remotely human, so that Klaatu's biology was radically altered to give him a human form acquired in 1928. When asked if he was human, Klaatu merely responds that "this body is human" and that "this body feels pain" when asked about that. No description of the race is given, other than that it is "different" from humans and the look "would only frighten you". He is captured by the military but escapes with help from Helen. He meets with a man named Mr. Wu (actually another alien of Klaatu's race in disguise, who has been living on Earth) to discuss whether or not humanity should be destroyed and they both agree that it needs to be done for the good of the planet, although Wu is unwilling to leave due to his newfound love for the humans. Klaatu orders smaller spheres—previously hidden on Earth—to begin taking animal species off the planet (like an ark) and activates Gort to destroy humanity. After spending time with Helen and her stepson Jacob, as well as talking with Professor Barnhart, Klaatu decides to try to stop humanity's destruction. After saving Jacob and his mother from Gort, Klaatu sacrifices his physical form to stop Gort, setting off a massive electromagnetic pulse before his body is destroyed. The EMP destroys Gort, saving humanity, but disables all electric technology in the world to give them the first step toward saving the earth. His spaceship/sphere then departs Earth after the pulse. It is unclear whether Klaatu survived or not; his human body was destroyed, but he indicated throughout the movie that he was merely residing in it and controlling it, so its destruction may not have killed him.

There are many differences between this version of Klaatu and the original, the most obvious being his expression of emotions and view of humanity. Reeves' Klaatu shows very little emotion, and explains this is because Klaatu "is an alien entity contained in a human body, and when he is looking out of that body, he is just looking out." The filmmakers thought that it would not make sense for an alien being to act as human as Rennie's Klaatu did, and so they "decided that in the beginning he should just be very different. That involved having no natural human gestures or behavioral signs but appearing more flat and expressionless. He has a concentrated way of seeing the world."

Klaatu has a very cynical view of humans, being very strict with them. This is best shown when he is talking with Secretary of Defense Regina Jackson (Kathy Bates). He is more concerned about the Earth's botanic and animal species than humanity, almost caring nothing about them. Another, less obvious, difference is his knowledge of the planet. The original Klaatu knew nothing of Earth, and he spent most of the film learning about it to decide whether or not it should be destroyed. In the later film, another member of Klaatu's race had been sent to Earth decades earlier to judge the planet and had remained living among humanity for 70 years. From the other alien's report and his own observations, Klaatu knew enough to conclude that humanity should be destroyed. However, both Klaatu and the alien sent before him, eventually realized humanity had the potential for good and should be preserved.

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In The Day the Earth Stood Still, a humanoid alien visitor named Klaatu comes to Earth, accompanied by a powerful eight-foot tall robot, Gort, to deliver an important message that will affect the entire human race.

Plot When a flying saucer lands in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Army quickly encircles the spaceship. A humanoid (Michael Rennie) emerges, announcing that he has come in peace.

When he advances, however, he unexpectedly opens a small cylindrical device and is shot by a nervous soldier.

A tall robot emerges from the saucer and disintegrates all of the soldiers' weapons using an energy ray. Notice originally,Gort only destroy s the soldiers weapons and not them.He doesn't ev burn their hands,as he destroys their weapons.Soldiers in tanks are allowed to leave before the tank disintegrate.

The alien orders Gort, the robot, to stop, then explains that the now-broken device was simply a gift for the President, which would have enabled him "to study life on the other planets".

The wounded alien is taken to Walter Reed Hospital, where he reveals his name: Klaatu.He says his name is simply Klaatu and nothing else.

There ,He uses a salve to quickly heal his wound.

Meanwhile, the military attempts to enter the spaceship, but finds it impenetrable; Gort stands outside the ship, silent and unmoving.

Klaatu tells the President's secretary, Mr. Harley (Frank Conroy), that he has come with a message that must be revealed to all the world's leaders simultaneously. Harley tells him that such a meeting in the current political climate is impossible. Klaatu suggests that he be allowed to go among humans to better understand their "unreasoning suspicions and attitudes." Harley rejects the proposal and leaves Klaatu under guard.

Klaatu escapes and lodges at a boarding house as "Mr. Carpenter" (the name on the dry cleaner's tag on the suit he "borrowed"). Among the residents are young widow Helen Benson (Patricia Neal) and her son Bobby (Billy Gray). The next morning, Klaatu listens to his fellow boarders' speculations about the alien's purpose.

While Helen and her boyfriend Tom Stephens (Hugh Marlowe) go out, Klaatu babysits Bobby. The boy takes Klaatu on a tour of the city, including a visit to his father's grave in Arlington National Cemetery; Klaatu learns that most of those buried there were killed in wars. The two view the heavily guarded saucer and visit the Lincoln Memorial. Klaatu asks Bobby who the greatest person living is.Bobby first I guess the Space Man,but Klaatu says who would be the smartest person.Bobby suggests Professor Barnhardt (Sam Jaffe), who lives in the city.Obviously,Professor Barnhart is a stand in Albert Einstein.Bobby takes Klaatu to Barnhardt's home, but the professor is absent. Klaatu adds a mathematical equation to a problem on Barnhardt's blackboard and leaves his contact information with the suspicious housekeeper.The housekeeper proceeds to erase what Klaatu put on the blackboard,but Klaatu imforms her not do do that.The professor will need to see that message.

Later, government agents escort Klaatu to see Barnhardt. Klaatu warns the professor that the people of the other planets have become concerned for their safety after humans developed atomic power. Klaatu declares that, if his message goes unheeded, "Earth will be eliminated."Professor Barnhart ask perhaps Klaatu should show a bit of his power,but something where no one will get hurt.Klaatu says that could be arranged

.Barnhardt agrees to gather scientists at Klaatu's saucer, suggesting that Klaatu give a demonstration of his power.  Klaatu back at the Boarding house enters Bobby's room at ask for a flashlight.He sees Bobby playing with a train ,and says one day,he should tell him about a train with no tracks.Bobby seems very amazed,but unquestionably friendly to Mister Carpenter,even he talks about things adults would otherwise question. Klaatu returns to his spaceship the next evening, unaware that Bobby has followed him. Klaatu uses the flashlight to silently signal Gort,in some sort of light code against a wall,that Gort faces.Bobby sees Gort knock out two guards and "Mr. Carpenter" enter the spaceship.Still ,you will notice Gort is using non lethal force.

Bobby tells Helen and Tom what he saw, but they do not believe him until Tom takes a diamond found in Klaatu's room to a jeweller, who informs him it is "unlike any other on Earth." Sometimes later,Klaatu finds Helen at her workplace. They take an empty service elevator which stops precisely at noon. Klaatu reveals his true identity and asks for her help. He has neutralized all electricity everywhere except where human safety would be compromised, such as hospitals and aircraft in flight.

After the blackout ends, the manhunt for Klaatu intensifies. When Tom informs the military of his suspicions, Helen breaks up with him. Helen and Klaatu take a taxi to Barnhardt's home. En route, he tells her that should anything happen to him, she must go to Gort and say "Klaatu barada nikto". After being spotted, Klaatu makes a break for it, but is killed. Helen then heads to the saucer. Gort awakens,obviously aware Klaatu has killed.Gort disintegrates the two night guards, and advances on her.Notice Gort,once knowing Klaatu has killed,begins to use lethal force. When Helen utters the three words, the robot carries her into the spaceship, then retrieves Klaatu's body from the jail,by destroying the wall. Gort revives Klaatu, but he explains to Helen that it is only temporary, that power being "reserved for the Almighty Spirit".

Klaatu and Helen emerge from saucer after Barnhardt's scientists have assembled. Klaatu declares that the people of Earth have a choice.

They can join the other planets in peace, but should they threaten to extend their violence into space, "this Earth of yours will be reduced to a burned-out cinder. We will be waiting for your answer." Klaatu smiles at Helen showing he has goodwill to some humans and Gort then depart in their spaceship.


Cast notes Well-known broadcast journalists of their time, H. V. Kaltenborn, Elmer Davis, Drew Pearson, and Gabriel Heatter, appeared and/or were heard as themselves in cameo roles.

Spencer Tracy and Claude Rains were originally considered for the part of Klaatu.


Metaphors In a 1995 interview producer Julian Blaustein explained that Joseph Breen, the film censor installed by the Motion Picture Association of Americaat the Twentieth Century Fox studios, balked at the portrayal of Klaatu's resurrection and limitless power.

At the behest of the MPAA, a line was inserted into the film; when Helen asks Klaatu whether Gort has unlimited power over life and death, Klaatu explains that he has only been revived temporarily and "that power is reserved to the Almighty Spirit.

Of the elements that he added to Klaatu's character, screenwriter Edmund North said, "It was my private little joke. I never discussed this angle with Blaustein or Wise because I didn't want it expressed. I had originally hoped that the Christ comparison would be subliminal.

That the question even came up in an interview is proof enough that such comparisons did not remain subliminal, but they are subtle enough that it is not immediately obvious to all viewers which elements were intended to compare Klaatu to Christ. When Klaatu escapes from the hospital, he steals the clothing of a "Maj. Carpenter," carpentry being the profession Jesus learned from his father Joseph. He presents himself as John Carpenter, the same initials as Jesus Christ. At the end of the film, Klaatu rises from the dead and ascends into the night sky. Other parallels include his apprehension by authorities at night, his befriending of children, his having wisdom and knowledge far beyond any human being, and people being given a sign of his power.

Production Farewell to the Master

Farewll to the Master epubFarewell to the Master rtfFarewell to the Master pdf

"Farewell to the Master" Comic Version by Marvel Comics

Farewll to the Master epubFarewell to the Master rtfFarewell to the Master pdf

Final Script for The Day the Earth Stood Still

Script of The Day the Earth Staood StillScript fot The Day the earth Stood Still rtfScript for The Day the Earth Stood Still pdf

Producer Julian Blaustein set out to make a film under the working titles of Farewell to the Master and Journey to the World that illustrated the fear and suspicion that characterized the early Cold War and Atomic Age.

He reviewed more than 200 science fiction short stories and novels in search of a storyline that could be used, since this film genre was well suited for a metaphorical discussion of such grave issues. Studio head Darryl F. Zanuck gave the go-ahead for this project, and Blaustein hired Edmund North to write the screenplay based on elements from Harry Bates's 1940 short story Farewell to the Master.

The revised final screenplay was completed on February 21, 1951. Science fiction writer Raymond F. Jones worked as an uncredited adviser.


Pre-production The set was designed by Thomas Little and Claude Carpenter.

They collaborated with the noted architect Frank Lloyd Wright for the design of the spacecraft. Paul Laffoley has suggested that the futuristic interior was inspired by Wright's Johnson Wax Headquarters, completed in 1936.

Laffoley quotes Wright and his attempt in designing the exterior: "... to imitate an experimental substance that I have heard about which acts like living tissue. If cut, the rift would appear to heal like a wound, leaving a continuous surface with no scar.


Filming Principal outdoor photography for The Day the Earth Stood Still was shot on the 20th Century Fox sound stages and on its studio back lot (now located in Century City, California), with a second unit shooting background plates and other scenes in Washington D.C. and at Fort George G. Meade in Maryland.

The shooting schedule was from April 3 to May 23, 1951. The primary actors never traveled to Washington for the making of the film. Robert Wise indicated in the DVD commentary that the War Department refused participation in the movie based on a reading of the script.

The military equipment shown came from the Virginia Army National Guard, although one of the tanks bears the "Brave Rifles" insignia of the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, then stationed at Ft. Meade.

The robot Gort, who serves Klaatu, was played by Lock Martin, who worked as an usher at Grauman's Chinese Theater and stood seven feet tall. Not used to being in such a confining, heat-inducing costume, he worked carefully when wearing the two demanding, metallic-looking, stitched-up-the-front or -back, prop suits needed for creating the illusion on screen of a seamless Gort.

Wise decided that Martin's on-screen shooting time would be limited to half hour intervals, so Martin, with his generally weak constitution, would face no more than minor discomfort. These segments, in turn, were then edited together into film's final print.

In a commentary track on DVD, interviewed by fellow director Nicholas Meyer, the director Robert Wise stated that he wanted the film to appear as realistic and believable as possible, in order to drive home the motion picture's core message against armed conflict in the real world. Also mentioned in the DVD's documentary interview was the original title for the movie, "The Day the World Stops." Blaustein said his aim with the film was to promote a "strong United Nations. The music score was composed by Bernard Herrmann in August 1951, and was his first score after he moved from New York to Hollywood. Herrmann chose unusual instrumentation for the film: violin, cello, and bass (all three electric), two theremin electronic instruments (played by Dr. Samuel Hoffman and Paul Shure), two Hammond organs, a large studio electric organ, three vibraphones, two glockenspiels, marimba, tam-tam, 2 bass drums, 3 sets of timpani, two pianos, celesta, two harps, 1 horn, three trumpets, three trombones, and four tubas.

Herrmann's notable advances in film scoring included Unison organs, tubas, piano, and bass drum, staggered tritone movement, and glissando in theremins, as well as exploitation of the dissonance between D and E-flat and experimentation with unusual overdubbing and tape-reversal techniques. Trivia. 20th Century Fox later reused the Bernard Herrmann title theme in the original pilot episode of Irwin Allen's 1965 TV series Lost in Space; the music was also used extensively in Allen's Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea series episode, “The Indestructible Man.” Danny Elfman noted The Day the Earth Stood Still '​s score inspired his interest in film composing, and made him a fan of Herrmann.

Lost in Space,in the series pilot and specific episodes like the Keeper,used much of the movie.It was felt maybe,in the Keeper episode,Michael Renny played both parts Klaatu and the Keeper.


Reception Critical response The Day the Earth Stood Still was well received by critics and is widely regarded as one of the best films of 1951.

The Day the Earth Stood Still was moderately successful when released, accruing US$1,850,000 in distributors' domestic (U.S. and Canada) rentals, making it the year's 52nd biggest earner. Variety praised the film's documentary style, and the Los Angeles Times praised its seriousness, though it also found "certain subversive elements." Bosley Crowther of The New York Times called it "tepid entertainment."

The Day the Earth Stood Still earned more plaudits overseas: the Hollywood Foreign Press Association gave the filmmakers a special Golden Globe Award for "promoting international understanding." Bernard Herrmann's score also received a nomination at the Golden Globes. The French magazine Cahiers du cinéma was also impressed, with Pierre Kast calling it "almost literally stunning" and praising its "moral relativism."

The Day the Earth Stood Still is ranked seventh in Arthur C. Clarke's list of the best Science-Fiction films of all time, just above Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, which Clarke94% Certified Fresh himself co-wrote.

The Day the Earth Stood Still holds a 94% "Certified Fresh" rating on the review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes. Legacy.

In 1995 The Day the Earth Stood Still was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant"."

The Day the Earth Stood Still also received recognition from the American Film Institute. In 2001, it was ranked number 82 on 100 Years...100 Thrills, a list of America's most heart-pounding films. It placed number 67 on a similar list 100 Years...100 Cheers, a list of America's most inspiring films.

In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed its "10 Top 10" — the best ten films in ten "classic" American film genres — after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community. The Day the Earth Stood Still was acknowledged as the fifth best film in the science fiction genre. The film was also on the ballot for AFI's other lists including 100 Years...100 Movies, the tenth anniversary list, 100 Years...100 Heroes and Villains for Klaatu in the heroes category,[33] 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes for the famous line "Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!", and AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores. In 2004, the film was selected by The New York Times as one of The Best 1000 Movies Ever Made.

Lou Cannon and Colin Powell believed the film inspired Ronald Reagan to discuss uniting against an alien invasion when meeting Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985. Two years later, Reagan told the United Nations, "I occasionally think how quickly our differences worldwide would vanish if we were facing an alien threat from outside this world".


Klaatu barada nikto Since the release of the film, the phrase "Klaatu barada nikto" has appeared repeatedly in fiction and in popular culture. The Robot Hall of Fame described it as "one of the most famous commands in science fiction", while Frederick S. Clarke of Cinefantastique called it "the most famous phrase ever spoken by an extraterrestrial".

Edmund H. North, who wrote The Day the Earth Stood Still, also created the alien language used in the film, including the iconic phrase "Klaatu barada nikto". The official spelling for the phrase comes directly from the script (as shown in the image to the left) and provides insight as to its proper pronunciation.

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In the classic 1951 sci-fi film The Day the Earth Stood Still the alien Klaatu arrives on Earth with a message for the world's leaders. His welcome on arrival was less than warm.

Anticipating that things could go very wrong, Klaatu teaches a human woman this phrase should anything happen to him. Klaatu Barada Nikto is a now common catchphrase in sci-fi. It was a message to shut down the rampage of the robot, Gort, that accompanied Klaatu on his mission to Earth. Oddly enough, no known translation has ever been given for the phrase though "Klaatu" can be presumed to refer to the film's protagonist.

The classic status of the film has led to Klaatu Barada Nikto being hidden in all manner of media from sci-fi to fantasy to comic books to music.

Despite its appearance in the original and even though Keanu Reeves insisted on its presence, the phrase was deliberately rendered almost unintelligible in The Remake.

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Anime and Manga  Whether a coincidence or not, the phrase shows up in the second episode of the Read or Die OVA when Genjo begins to chant while preparing to chant. It's rendered more like klatu barata niktu and only in the dub, but it can still be heard fairly clearly. Comic Books  Bettie Page Comics #1, Bettie greets visiting aliens with this famed phrase... but gets it wrong. "Klaatu Barrada Ditko" indeed. Incredible Hulk character Klaatu was named after Klaatu. In a Fantastic Four comic by John Byrne, the FF run into aliens in the Arctic. A rather frustrated Ben Grimm says that if he hears any "Klaatu Barada Nikto!", he's out of there (paraphrased). In one Don Rosa comic, Donald Duck greets an alien with this phrase, accompanied by the Vulcan salute (or as close to it as he can get with only four fingers). New 52: Mr. Terrific tries this when taken prisoner aboard an aliens Comic Comic Strips  My Cage: The first thoughts of baby Sunny, likely trying to shut down her psychotic mother.  Fan Fan Works  In Plan 7 of 9 from Outer Space this is the standard First Contact greeting for a Flying Saucer, but no-one has any idea what it means.  Films Films — Live-Action  In Army of Darkness, Ash needs to say these three words when acquiring the Necronomicon, or else something bad will happen. And of course when it comes time to say them, he forgets what the third word is. Twice. Ash: Klaatu... barada... niCOUGHtCOUGH! Some of the subsequent allusions to this phrase (including some listed on this page) refer to Army of Darkness, which has overshadowed The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) to some extent. Extremely obvious in Germany. In Army of Darkness's German dub version, the line was "Klaatu Verata Nikto", so every German dub afterwards that considered AoD to be the origin of the reference will have the "Verata" line. In Galaxy Quest, the Thermians come from the Klaatu nebula. In Star Wars, Klaatu and Barada were two of Jabba's Nikto guards in Return of the Jedi. In the Robin Williams movie Toys, the Big Bad tries to deactivate his experimental killing machine with this in the climax. In TRON, a plaque that reads "Gort, Klaatu Barada Nikto" can be seen on the wall of Alan Bradley's cubicle. Oddly appropriate for a programmer on a system like ENCOM's grid. In Chopping Mall, one of the characters says this when trying to pacify a Literature Literature  In the short story "A Sound of Blunder", Klaatu Barada Nicto was the phrase spoken to the Captain Ersatz of the Necronomicon in order to travel through time. Saying it backwards brings one back to our time. In one of the volumes of Animorphs Ax is forced to demorph in front of a human (to his Andalite form) when his morph is poisoned. Marco, still in morph and using thought-speak to speak for Ax, tries to salvage the situation by saying <Greetings, Earthling! Klaatu barada nikto! I come in peace!> In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, the Nikto are a species of reptilian slaves, while Barada and Klaatu are two of Jabba the Hutt's lackeys. In the Stephen King novel The Tommyknockers, a young reporter, John Leandro, is convinced that something is wrong in a small town called Haven. His colleague, David Bright mocks him from it, saying that it's must be "green men from space" and quotes the phrase. (The town is actually controlled by aliens). The Poisonwood Bible gives a brief mention of this phrase when Rachel wants to yell some foreign language at the Congolese villagers, among other options "Bukabuka" or "We like Ike". A series called 'The Klaatu Diskos' has the Klaatu, ghostlike beings made from a transplanted human consciousness. By book two, there have been no signs of either 'nikto' or 'barada', but a horse called Gort has showed up. Leeloo says "Klaatu Barata Nikto" shortly after getting into Korben's cab in the novelization of The Fifth Element. Live-Action TV  The phrase appeared in an episode of The Monkees, when Micky Dolenz is replaced by an alien-controlled robot. One of the three passwords in the Room of the Secret Password in Legends of the Hidden Temple. In The Rockford Files, Rockford said it to a rather large chunk of muscle. In Two and a Half Men, when Alan starts sleepwalking, he says it to Charlie as he's put to bed. In a third-season episode of The X-Files, a man pretending to suffer from stigmata begins faking glossolalia (speaking in tongues); one of the phrases he says is this. In a last season episode of Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, this phrase is pronounced as Klaatu Varada Nictu as part of a spell from the Egyptian Necronomicon, a.k.a. The Book of the Dead. Music  The band Klaatu is named after the same character. When Klaatu first became known, they were rumored to be the Beatles reunited under a pseudonym. Ringo Starr's solo album Goodnight Vienna◊ uses a still from The Day The Earth Stood Still as its cover art, with Ringo's head replacing Klaat Radio Radio  In one episode of the German Comedy Series "Sataan - Die Serie", the titular character tries to use the phrase "Klaatu Verata niktu" (see the Army of Darkness example) to bring the end of the world. Theater  The play The Foreigner references this. The main character, a science-fiction magazine editor, ends up scaring off the local KKK with a string of frightening-sounding nonsense, including this line. Video Games  In Fallout 2 the hostile Mr. Handy robot guarding the crashed Enclave vertibird in Klamath Canyon says the line "Gort! Klaatu Berada Nictu!". Reunion has a scientist named Klaatoo and a planet named after him with moons called Barada and Nikto. The manual mentions he is a fan of old SF films and the discoverer of the planet Klaatoo. The moons get discovered much later, though. The Lost Vikings 2; in the medieval levels, the teleportation spell is always "Klaatu, barada, something". Needless to say they don't work as desired. In RuneScape, the magic words "Klaatu Barada Nikto" spoken by a certain character trigger a spell that teleports you a place where you can mine rune essence. In Sacrifice, "klaatu", "barada", and "nikto" are three of the magic words that are combined to form various magical incantations; though not necessarily all three together or in order. Mysterio's first appearance in Spider-Man 2, The Game Of The Movie, has him posing as an alien invader, and says this, as well as "All Your Base Are Belong to Us." In World of Warcraft, there are three NPCs named Klaatu, Barada and Nikto. Spyro 2: Ripto's Rage! references this, as a sage in one of the later levels claimed that saying those words would bring Spyro to Dragon Shores (being where he wanted to go at the start of the game). However, he couldn't quite remember the third word, so he dropped the matter. There's a series of helms in Dragonfable named after this. Spike the Clown from Toon Struck says this in response to being told "I believe the spatula is mine!". Did we mention he's an insane clown? In one mission in the RTS Myth II: Soulblighter, a barbarian is sent to say the magic phrase that will awaken Myrdred the Deceiver. Subverted when, even though the barbarian says something like "Clambake Baraka Nictuu", it works anyway... Myrdred wakes up from his thousand-year-sleep, says "close enough", and teleports himself and your troops out of the area. When Globox is trying to open the doors in Rayman 3: Hoodlum Havoc, he can be heard calling out this phrase, among others. In Robot Odyssey, it pops up after solving the final puzzle on the city level. In the "Ebil Dread" adventure from the AdventureQuest Worlds 2nd Birthday Event, the horde of pink undead summoned up by Beleen can only be destroyed by assembling the George Lowe-onomicon and speaking the magic words. As the adventure in question is a Shout-Out to the Evil Dead series and Army of Darkness in particular (including Artix replacing his possessed pink hand with a chainsaw), one can pretty much guess what those magic words are. And much like Ash, Artix...doesn't quite get that last word right. Poor guy. The Peacekeeper in Sword of the Stars, in Pig Latin. It's been nicknamed "Ortgay" as a result. Ragnarok Online the quest in the underworld Nifflheim (part of the very long "Sign" quest) where you speak the magic words "Klaatu Barada Nikto" to a ghost named "Ash", this is another Army of Darkness reference as the title character of that movie is Ash. Uttered by the Advanced Magic Towers in Kingdom Rush. In Poker Night 2 when in the Evil Dead inventory skin, Max will try to say this from the Necronomicon to the first player eliminated, but messes it up (the player is still sucked into the book). Ash even tries to correct Max, but he still messes it up. He later claims he needs his ears checked. One of Gaige's phrases when she summons Deathtrap in Borderlands2. In Dungeons & Dragons Online, the Daelkyr Lord of Eyes, Belashyrra, chants the phrase 'Utaalk Adarab Otkin' in order to close a portal to the Plane of Madness during the quest Acute Delirium. Wizard 101: Yevgeny Nightcreeper says this when he summons Khrulhu. In Mystery Case Files: Huntsville, the alias of Doris Blevins, a hoaxer that disguises herself as an alien to terrorize the locals, is Klatu Barrada Nikto. The enemy robots in Robo Recall sometimes say this upon death. Webcomics  This Bob and George. The commentary by the author states that it was in reference to Army of Darkness, and he had never seen The Day the Earth Stood Still. In Monster of the Week Mrs. Paddock has a chapel-thing on which she wrote "Klaatu Barada Nikto" under the pentagram. In Sinfest, this is the incantation Lil' E uses to summon a hellhound. PvP: The Dork Ages. "Klaatu Barada Nikto" was the secret password to obtain an Xbox. Legostar Galactica features three dark Jedi named Chris Klaatu, Barada and Ambar Nikto. Nodwick. It's a password. Freefall: Klaatu! Barada! Doggy! (http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff1400/fc01372.htm here). In Two Lumps, near the end of its Yet Another Christmas Carol, Eben tries various escape chants: "There's no place like home! Klaatu Barada Nikto! Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, B—" A Running Gag in Joe Loves Crappy Movies is imagining The Grimace in various movie roles to make crappy movies better. When he's pictured in Keanu Reeves's place in The Day the Earth Stood Still (2008), he says "Klaatu Barada Milkshake". When a Roomba chases Ebenezer, it mutters the line at the end of this strip. Web Original  That Guy with the Glasses: Its use in The Evil Dead (probably) is referenced in Suburban Knights. However, The Nostalgia Critic pronounces it "Klaatu... Barada... Necktie..." To Boldly Flee, the sequel to the above, has the Critic get saved in the middle of a battle by The Angry Video Game Nerd dressed as Gort. He mumbles "Klaatu, Barada, whatever" and goes on with his mission. In the "Ouija/Domino Rally" episode of Board James, James tries to say the phrase while doing his Ouija ritual, but has a fit of coughing before he can complete saying "nikto". Western Animation  Jimmy Neutron used these as magic words in a Harry Potter parody. The phrase was also used by Carl in the episode "Time Is Money", when Jimmy met his own parents in the past. One episode of the 2003 version of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles had Michelangelo trying to stop an alien Humongous Mecha this way. It doesn't work. An episode of the 1980s Turtles series revealed that members of the alien Polarisoid's family had these names. An episode of Darkwing Duck has aliens from a literal Planet of Hats invade Earth; their names are Flarg, Barada, and Nikto, but the benevolent alien ruler who comes to apprehend them is named Klaatu II. Phantom Investigators: Jinxy opens a portal to the Nether-realm in the "Were-Dog" episode by chanting Klaatu Barada Nikelready. In an episode of Rocko's Modern Life, Heffer, convinced that Filburt is an alien, intent on high-fiving the rest of them to death (just go with it), says the phrase to Filburt, in an attempt to trick him into revealing that he's an alien by way of understanding it. According to Heffer, "It's alien language, I heard it from a sci-fi movie." An alien species uses the phrase (actually, "Klaatu Nikto Barada", but close enough) as a greeting in an episode of Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers. Bat-Bat turns it into a malapropism in the Bakshi Mighty Mouse episode "Bat With A Golden Tongue." Confronted by a figure who he thinks is not of this world, he chants "Klaatu! Baraga! Nicotine!" In Johnny Bravo, Carl used this (amongst other sci-fi catchphrases) to greet an alien. In The Simpsons Treehouse Of Horror XVIII Bart throws a ball that hits Kodos, who then "swears" with these words. In the pseudo-Crisis Crossover episode of The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, "Billy and Mandy Moon the Moon", Billy says this right before beating the stuffing out of a group of lunar aliens. in LoliRock, Mephisto uses (or rather try to use) these words to control a monster he created. It doesn't work very well against the princesses. Real Life  The Mozilla Firefox "about:robots" page has the title "Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!" Previous Index Next Insufficiently Advanced Alien Alien Tropes Law of Alien Names It Was a Dark and Stormy Night Shout-Outs Index The Name Is Bond, James Bond "King Kong" Climb Stock Parodies "Last Supper" Steal Kitsune WeAreNotAlone/Tropes E to L Klotski Kill Him Already! Stock Phrases Ladies and Germs Ask The Tropers Trope Finder You Know That Show... Trope Launch Pad Reviews Live Blogs DISPLAY

You DMCA Notice TVTropes is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org. Privacy Policy No translation was given in the film. Philosophy professor Aeon J. Skoble speculates the famous phrase is a "safe-word" that is part of a fail-safe feature used during the diplomatic missions such as the one Klaatu and Gort make to Earth. With the use of the safe-word, Gort's deadly force can be deactivated in the event the robot is mistakenly triggered into a defensive posture. Skoble observes that the theme has evolved into a "staple of science fiction that the machines charged with protecting us from ourselves will misuse or abuse their power". In this interpretation the phrase apparently tells Gort that Klaatu considers escalation unnecessary.

Fantastic Films magazine explored the meaning of "Klaatu barada nikto" in a 1978 article titled The Language of Klaatu. The article, written by Tauna Le Marbe, who is listed as their "Alien Linguistics Editor", attempts to translate all the alien words Klaatu used throughout the film. In the article the literal translation for Klaatu barada nikto was "Stop Barbarism (I have) death, bind" and the free translation was "I die, repair me, do not retaliate."

The documentary Decoding "Klaatu Barada Nikto": Science Fiction as Metaphor examined the phrase "Klaatu barada nikto" with some of the people involved with The Day the Earth Stood Still. Robert Wise, director of the film, related a story he had with Edmund North saying North told him, "Well, it's just something I kind of cooked up. I thought it sounded good".[41] Billy Gray, who played Bobby Benson in the film, said that he thought that the message was coming from Klaatu and that, "barada nikto must mean ... save Earth".[42] Florence Blaustein, widow of the producer Julian Blaustein, said North had to pass a street called Baroda every day going to work and said, "I think that's how that was born."[43] Film historian Steven Jay Rubin recalled an interview he had with North when he asked the question, "What is the direct translation of Klaatu barada nikto, and Edmund North said to me 'There's hope for earth, if the scientists can be reached.'"[44]

Mozilla Firefox features an Easter egg that involves the phrase; when typing in "about:robots" into the address bar, the words "Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!" appears in the tab display. Other robot-related references on the page include nods to Isaac Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics, the tears in rain soliloquy from the film Blade Runner, two lines from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, a quote from the character Bender from Futurama, and a tagline from Battlestar Galactica.[45] Klaatu, Barada, and Nikto are the names of three minor characters among the personnel on Jabba The Hutt's sail barge (featured in Return of the Jedi). Sam Raimi used the three words in The Army of Darkness, in a scene where a wise man tells Ash, played by Bruce Campbell, to say "Klaatu barada nikto", so he could take the book safely.Klaatu barada nikto Klaatu barada nikto

Script page of The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) showing the phrase Character Klaatu (first) John Carpenter. Helen Benson (second) Actor Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal First used in The Day the Earth Stood Still "Klaatu barada nikto" is a phrase that originated in the 1951 science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still. The humanoid alien protagonist of the film, Klaatu (Michael Rennie), instructs Helen Benson (Patricia Neal) that if any harm befalls him, she must say the phrase to the robot Gort (Lockard Martin). In response Gort relents from destroying the Earth and resurrects Klaatu from death.[1]

Usage in the film Edmund H. North, who wrote The Day the Earth Stood Still, also created the alien language used in the film, including the phrase "Klaatu barada nikto". The official spelling of the phrase comes directly from the script (as shown in the above image) and provides insight as to its proper pronunciation.

The phrase was never translated in the film and neither Edmund North nor 20th Century Fox ever released an official translation.

Near the end of the film, as Klaatu is pursued by the American military, he urges Helen Benson to memorize the phrase, saying "There's no limit to what he can do. He could destroy the Earth... If anything should happen to me you must go to Gort, you must say these words: 'Klaatu barada nikto.' Please repeat that."

Shortly after Klaatu is shot and killed. Knowing that Klaatu has died, Gort dissolves the polymer cube encasing him and disintegrates the two guards standing watch. Helen watches Gort kill the guards, then conveys Klaatu's message. Gort takes her inside the spaceship, and then retrieves Klaatu's lifeless body, which he revives.

Usage in 2008 remake In the 2008 remake, the line was added at Keanu Reeves' insistence.[2] Klaatu uses it near the beginning of the film to shut down Gort, and again at the end, highly distorted and barely audible, when he stops the destruction of the Earth. Although the line can be heard in the film, it does not appear in the English subtitles.Keanu Reeves is proceeded get the shit beat out of himself,by Gearge Reeve,Christopher Reeves,Alex Winter,George Carlin and Michael Renny all screaming "Our planet,fucker ?Yeah,our planet hippy vegetarian beatick jerkoff."

Interpretation Because there is no official translation of the phrase, a few notable attempts have been made to determine the phrase's meaning:

Philosophy professor Aeon J. Skoble speculates the famous phrase is part of a fail-safe feature used during diplomatic missions, whereby Gort's deadly force can be deactivated in the event the robot is undesirably triggered into a defensive posture. Skoble observes that this theme has evolved into a "staple of science fiction that the machines charged with protecting us from ourselves will misuse or abuse their power."[3] In this interpretation the phrase apparently tells Gort that Klaatu considers escalation unnecessary.

Fantastic Films explored the meaning of "Klaatu barada nikto" in the 1978 article "The Language of Klaatu". In the article Tauna Le Marbe, the magazine's Alien Linguistics Editor, attempts to translate all the alien words Klaatu used throughout the film.[4] Le Marbe's literal translation was "Stop Barbarism, (I have) death, bind;" the free translation was "I die, repair me, do not retaliate."[4]

The documentary Decoding "Klaatu Barada Nikto": Science Fiction as Metaphor examined the phrase "Klaatu barada nikto" with some of the people involved with The Day the Earth Stood Still. Robert Wise, director of the original, recalled a conversation he had with Edmund North, saying North told him, "...it's just something I kind of cooked up. I thought it sounded good."[5]

Billy Gray, who played Bobby Benson in the film, said that "barada nikto must mean... save Earth".[6] Florence Blaustein, widow of the producer Julian Blaustein, said North had to pass a street called Baroda every day going to work and said, "I think that's how that was born."[7] Film historian Steven Jay Rubin recalled an interview he had with North when he asked the question, "What is the direct translation of 'Klaatu barada nikto?' And Edmund North said to me, 'There's hope for Earth, if the scientists can be reached.'"[8]

In popular culture "Klaatu barada nikto" has been used extensively in popular culture. The Robot Hall of Fame describes the phrase as "one of the most famous commands in science fiction"[9] and Frederick S. Clarke of Cinefantastique called it "the most famous phrase ever spoken by an extraterrestrial."[10]

As a tribute to The Day the Earth Stood Still, George Lucas named three minor characters Klaatu, Barada, and Nikto, in Return of the Jedi. In the 1992 film Army of Darkness, Ash (Bruce Campbell) has to speak similar words in order to retrieve the Necronomicon but fails to remember it properly ("Klaatu... verata... n... Necktie. Nectar. Nickel. Noodle."). In the end, he speaks the words again after consuming a potion, allowing him to return to his era. The words were altered from their original use because their meaning was unclear in the original.[11]: In the 1992 film Army of Darkness, Ash (Bruce Campbell) has to speak similar words in order to retrieve the Necronomicon but fails to remember it properly ("Klaatu... verata... n... Necktie. Nectar. Nickel. Noodle."). In the end, he speaks the words again after consuming a potion, allowing him to return to his era. The words were altered from their original use because their meaning was unclear in the original.

It looks like they did change the words for Army of Darkness. I'm not sure what's right anymore. In the 1998 video game Myth II: Soulblighter, some characters must reach the body of The Deceiver and revive him by speaking the words. (The character is unable to remember the words correctly, but after several tries The Deceiver revives with a muttered, "Close enough.") In The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas when Fred and Barney rescue The Great Gazoo from his crash landing, Gazoo utters, "Gort, Klaatu barada nikto." The phrase was used in an off-hand fashion by Commander John Crichton in the TV series Farscape, in the season 4 episode "I Shrink Therefore I Am".[12] In the Firefox web browser, the about:robots page is an Easter egg containing a small number of robot references, with the "page title" (in the browser tab) reading Gort! Klaatu barada nikto!.[13] In the 1982 film Tron, Alan Bradley's cubicle has a sign that reads "Gort, Klaatu Barada Nikto."[14]

"Gort, Klaatu Barada Nikto" in the film Tron. 1989: in the 1987 animated Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles TV series episode "Invasion of the Turtle Snatchers", a family of three aliens encountered by Donatello and Rocksteady are named Klaatu, Barada and Nikto. Klaatu is the father, Barada is the mother and Nikto is the little boy. In this version, Klaatu, Barada and Nikto come from a planet orbiting the star Antares.[15] In the 1992 film Toys, General Zevo (Michael Gambon) says "Klaatu Barada Nicto" in attempt to shut down the robotic Sea Swine that is out of control. He is shown injured but alive, implying it shut down after firing a rocket. The June 7, 1994 edition of Weekly World News reported that 12 U.S. senators were aliens from other planets. The piece quoted several senators or their spokespersons humorously "confirming" the story. Associated Press ran a follow-up piece that confirmed the tongue-in-cheek participation of Senate offices in the story. WWN quoted Senator Phil Gramm (R–TX) as saying he was "amazed it took you this long to find out." Charles Pelkey, the then-spokesman for Senator Alan Simpson (R–WY), told AP: "We've got only one thing to say: Klaatu barada nikto."[16] In the French animated seriesLoliRock, episode "Castles in the Sand", Mephisto tries to use the phrase to unlock his sand monster's powers but is unable to finish saying the three words.[17] In the first season of the comedy series Two and a Half Men, episode 22 ("My Doctor Has a Cow Puppet"), Alan Harper is sleepwalking in Charlie's living room, trying to clean the floor of "dust bunny" poop with a vacuum cleaner. As his brother takes him back to his room, Alan turns to Charlie and says "Gort, Klaatu barada nikto" before going to bed. In the Galaxy Rangers series (1986), at the episode "15 Queen's Lair" , at time 12:27, a variation of the sentence: "Klaatu nikto barada", is used by a representative person of the so called "Freedom Fighters", when the Galaxy Rangers group is looking for the source power for the new weapon of the bandit "Queen of the Crown". In Attack of the Hideous Space-Varmints (1997), Donald Duck utters "Er – 'Klaatu barada nikto'?" to a space varmint before she douses Scrooge McDuck with soapy electrolytes.[18] In Scary Movie 5 (2013), the protagonist and her friend find a book in the basement of a cabin and use the spell to put an end to a curse involving the protagonist's family, but they end up summoning a demon that possesses the group of young people living in the cabin and the demon makes them to mutilate, self-harm and torture themselves, while the protagonist says the spell multiple times without knowing what was happening.


Professor Barnhardt's blackboard problem

The blackboard problem seen in the professor's office is a real set of equations known as the three-body problem.


Music and soundtrack

Main article: The Day the Earth Stood Still (soundtrack) The Day the Earth Stood Still Film score by Bernard Herrmann Released 1993 Recorded August, 1951 Genre Soundtracks, Film score Length 35:33 Label 20th Century Fox Producer Nick Redman Professional ratings Review scores Source Rating AllMusic 4.5/5 stars link

20th Century Fox later reused the Bernard Herrmann title theme in the original pilot episode of Irwin Allen's 1965 TV series Lost in Space; the music was also used extensively in Allen's Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea series episode, “The Indestructible Man.” Danny Elfman noted The Day the Earth Stood Still '​s score inspired his interest in film composing, and made him a fan of Herrmann.

Adaptations

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