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November 8, 1969 (pilot)

December 16, 1970 – May 27, 1973 |}

“Good evening, and welcome to a private showing of three paintings, displayed here for the first time. Each is a collector’s item in its own way—not because of any special artistic quality, but because each captures on a canvas, suspends in time and space, a frozen moment of a nightmare.” Night Gallery is an American anthology series that aired on NBC from 1970 to 1973, featuring stories of horror and themacabreRod Serling, who had gained fame from an earlier series, The Twilight Zone, served both as the on-air host of Night Gallery and as a major contributor of scripts, although he did not have the same control of content and tone as he had on The Twilight Zone.[1][2]Serling viewed Night Gallery as a logical extension of The Twilight Zone, but while both series shared an interest in thought-provoking dark fantasy, the lion’s share of Zone‘s offerings were science fiction while Night Gallery focused on the other side of the genre: horror and the supernatural.[3]

Template:Infobox television “Good evening, and welcome to a private showing of three paintings, displayed here for the first time. Each is a collector’s item in its own way—not because of any special artistic quality, but because each captures on a canvas, suspends in time and space, a frozen moment of a nightmare.”Night Gallery is an American anthology series that aired on NBC from 1970 to 1973, featuring stories of horror and the macabre. Rod Serling, who had gained fame from an earlier series, The Twilight Zone, served both as the on-air host of Night Gallery and as a major contributor of scripts, although he did not have the same control of content and tone as he had on The Twilight Zone.[1][2]Serling viewed Night Gallery as a logical extension of The Twilight Zone, but while both series shared an interest in thought-provoking dark fantasy, the lion’s share of Zone‘s offerings were science fiction while Night Gallery focused on the other side of the genre: horror and the supernatural.[3] 

ContentsEdit

 [hide*1 Format

Format[edit]Edit

Serling appeared in an art gallery setting and introduced the macabre tales that made up each episode by unveiling paintings (by artist Thomas J. Wright) that depicted the stories. Night Gallery regularly presented adaptations of classic fantasy tales by authors such as H. P. Lovecraft, as well as original works, many of which were by Serling himself.Bolstering Serling’s thoughtful original dramas were adaptations of classic genre material—short stories by such dark-fantasy luminaries as H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, A. E. van Vogt, Algernon Blackwood, Conrad Aiken, Richard Matheson, August Derleth, and Christianna Brand. Variety of material brought with it a variety of tone, from the deadly serious to the tongue-in-cheek, stretching the television anthology concept to its very limits. But conflicts over the series’ direction arose between Serling and producer Jack Laird. The disgruntled host found himself excluded from the producer’s circle. Despite the tensions, Serling continued his dramatic contributions and ultimately scripted more than a third of the segments.

The series was introduced with a pilot TV movie that aired on November 8, 1969, and featured the directorial debut of Steven Spielberg, as well as one of the last acting performances by Joan Crawford.

Unlike the series, in which the paintings merely accompanied an introduction to the upcoming story, the paintings themselves actually appeared in the three segments, serving major or minor plot functions.

Night Gallery was initially part of a rotating anthology or wheel series called Four in One. This 1970–71 television series rotated four separate shows, including McCloudSFX (San Francisco International Airport) and The Psychiatrist. Two of these, Night Gallery and McCloud were renewed for the 1971–72 season with McCloud becoming the most popular and longest running of the four.

Reception[edit]Edit

The series attracted criticism for its use of comedic blackout sketches between the longer story segments in some episodes, and for its splintered, multiple-story format, which contributed to its uneven tone. Another notable difference from the original Twilight Zone series was there was no ending monologue by Serling summarizing the end of the story segment. Very often the camera would simply focus on the final chosen image (often for a chilling effect) for several seconds, then black out.

Serling wrote many of the teleplays, including "Camera Obscura", "The Caterpillar" (based on a short story by Oscar Cook), "Class of '99", "Cool Air" (based on a short story by H.P. Lovecraft), "The Doll", "Green Fingers", "Lindemann's Catch", and "The Messiah on Mott Street" (heavily influenced by Bernard Malamud's "Angel Levine"). Non-Serling efforts include "The Dead Man", "I'll Never Leave You—Ever", "Pickman's Model" (based on a short story by H.P. Lovecraft), "A Question of Fear", "Silent Snow, Secret Snow", and "The Sins of the Fathers".

By the final season, Serling, stung by criticism and ignored by the show's executives, all but disowned the series.

List of stories[edit]Edit

Pilot[edit]Edit

Title Original airdate Writer Director Cast Notes
"The Cemetery" November 8, 1969 Rod Serling Boris Sagal Roddy McDowallOssie DavisGeorge Macready Possibly inspired by the story "The Mezzotint" by M.R. James
"Eyes" November 8, 1969 Rod Serling Steven Spielberg Joan CrawfordBarry SullivanTom Bosley
"Escape Route" November 8, 1969 Rod Serling Barry Shear Richard KileySam Jaffe

Season 1: 1970–71[edit]Edit

Title Original airdate Writer Director Cast Notes
"The Dead Man" December 16, 1970 Douglas Heyes Douglas Heyes Carl BetzJeff CoreyLouise Sorel,Michael Blodgett Based on a short story of the same name by Fritz Leiber
"The Housekeeper" December 16, 1970 Matthew Howard John Meredyth Lucas Larry HagmanJeanette NolanSuzy Parker "Matthew Howard" was a pseudonym for Douglas Heyes
"Room with a View" December 23, 1970 Hal Dresner Jerrold Freedman Joseph WisemanDiane KeatonAngel Tompkins Based on a short story of the same name by Hal Dresner
"The Little Black Bag" December 23, 1970 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Burgess MeredithChill Wills Based on a short story of the same nameby C.M. Kornbluth
"The Nature of the Enemy" December 23, 1970 Rod Serling Allen Reisner Joseph CampanellaJames Sikking
"The House" December 30, 1970 Rod Serling John Astin Joanna PettetPaul RichardsSteve Franken Based on a short story by André Maurois
"Certain Shadows on the Wall" December 30, 1970 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Louis HaywardAgnes Moorehead,Grayson HallRachel Roberts Based on the short story "The Shadows on the Wall" by Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman
"Make Me Laugh" January 6, 1971 Rod Serling Steven Spielberg Godfrey CambridgeJackie Vernon,Tom BosleyAl Lewis
"Clean Kills and Other Trophies" January 6, 1971 Rod Serling Walter Doniger Raymond MasseyTom TroupeBarry BrownHerb Jefferson, Jr.
"Pamela's Voice" January 13, 1971 Rod Serling Richard Benedict Phyllis DillerJohn Astin
"Lone Survivor" January 13, 1971 Rod Serling Gene Levitt John ColicosTorin ThatcherHedley Mattingly Possibly inspired by the story of Frank Tower
"The Doll" January 13, 1971 Rod Serling Rudi Dorn Shani WallisJohn WilliamsHenry Silva Based on a short story of the same name by Algernon Blackwood
"They're Tearing Down Tim Riley's Bar" January 20, 1971 Rod Serling Don Taylor William WindomDiane BakerJohn RandolphBert Convy Serling considered this script one of the finest two works he ever wrote (along withRequiem for a Heavyweight).
"The Last Laurel" January 20, 1971 Rod Serling Daryl Duke Jack CassidyMartin E. Brooks,Martine Beswick Based on "The Horsehair Trunk" by Davis Grubb

Season 2: 1971–72[edit]Edit

Title Original airdate Writer Director Cast Notes
"The Boy Who Predicted Earthquakes" September 15, 1971 Rod Serling John Badham Clint HowardMichael Constantine,Bernie Kopell Based on a short story of the same name by Margaret St. Clair
"Miss Lovecraft Sent Me" September 15, 1971 Jack Laird Gene Kearney Joseph CampanellaSue Lyon
"The Hand of Borgus Weems" September 15, 1971 Alvin Sapinsley John M. Lucas George MaharisRay Milland Based on the short story "The Other Hand" by George Langelaan
"Phantom of What Opera?" September 15, 1971 Gene Kearney George Kearney Leslie Nielsen
"A Death in the Family" September 22, 1971 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc E. G. MarshallDesi Arnaz, Jr. Based on a short story by Miriam Allen deFord
"The Merciful" September 22, 1971 Jack Laird Jeannot Szwarc Imogene CocaKing Donovan Based on a short story of the same name by Charles L. Sweeney, Jr.; twist on "The Cask of Amontillado"
"The Class of '99" September 22, 1971 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Vincent PriceBrandon deWilde,Randolph Mantooth
"Witches' Feast" September 22, 1971 Gene Kearney Jerrold Freedman Agnes MooreheadRuth Buzzi
"Since Aunt Ada Came to Stay" September 29, 1971 Alvin Sapinsley William Hale Michele LeeJames Farentino,Jeanette NolanJonathan Harris Based on a short story "The Witch" by A. E. van Vogt
"With Apologies to Mr. Hyde" September 29, 1971 Jack Laird Jeannot Szwarc Adam WestJack Laird
"The Flip-Side of Satan" September 29, 1971 Malcolm Marmorstein& Gerald Sanford Jerrold Freedman Arte JohnsonLiam Sullivan the voice on records Based on a short story by Hal Dresner
"A Fear of Spiders" October 6, 1971 Rod Serling John Astin Patrick O'NealKim Stanley Based on a short story "The Spider" byElizabeth Walter
"Junior" October 6, 1971 Gene Kearney Theordore J. Flicker Wally Cox, Barbara Flicker
"Marmalade Wine" October 6, 1971 Jerrold Freedman Jerrold Freedman Robert MorseRudy Vallee Based on a short story by Joan Aiken
"The Academy" October 6, 1971 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Pat BooneLeif Erickson Based on a short story of the same title by David Ely
"The Phantom Farmhouse" October 20, 1971 Halsted Welles Jeannot Szwarc David McCallumLinda MarshDavid Carradine Based on a short story of the same title bySeabury Quinn
"Silent Snow, Secret Snow" October 20, 1971 Gene Kearney Gene Kearney Radames PeraLonny Chapman Based on a short story of the same title byConrad Aiken; narrated by Orson Welles
"A Question of Fear" October 27, 1971 Theodore J. Flicker Jack Laird Leslie NielsenFritz Weaver Based on a short story of the same title byBryan Lewis
"The Devil Is Not Mocked" October 27, 1971 Gene Kearney Gene Kearney Helmut DantineFrancis Lederer, Hank Brandt Based on a short story of the same title byManly Wade Wellman. Lederer reprises his role as Dracula from The Return of Dracula.
"Midnight Never Ends" November 3, 1971 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Susan StrasbergRobert F. Lyons
"Brenda" November 3, 1971 Matthew Howard Allen Reisner Laurie Prange, Glenn CorbettRobert J. HoganBarbara Babcock Based on a short story of the same title byMargaret St. Clair
"The Diary" November 10, 1971 Rod Serling William Hale Patty DukeVirginia MayoDavid Wayne Features a brief, late appearance byLindsay Wagner
"A Matter of Semantics" November 10, 1971 Gene Kearney Jack Laird Cesar RomeroE. J. Peaker
"Big Surprise" November 10, 1971 Richard Matheson Jeannot Szwarc John CarradineVincent Van Patten Based on a short story of the same title byRichard Matheson
"Professor Peabody's Last Lecture" November 10, 1971 Jack Laird Jerrold Freedman Carl Reiner A professor gives a lecture on entities from the Cthulhu Mythos. Possibly the first timeCthulhu's name appeared on national television.
"House with Ghost" November 17, 1971 Gene Kearney Gene Kearney Bob CraneJo Anne WorleyAlan Napier Based on a short story by August Derleth
"A Midnight Visit to the Neighborhood Blood Bank" November 17, 1971 Jack Laird William Hale Victor Buono
"Dr. Stringfellow's Rejuvenator" November 17, 1971 Rod Serling Jerrold Freedman Forrest TuckerMurray HamiltonDon Pedro Colley
"Hell's Bells" November 17, 1971 Theodore J. Flicker Theodore J. Flicker John Astin Based on a short story by Harry Turner
"The Dark Boy" November 24, 1971 Halsted Welles John Astin Elizabeth HartmanGale Sondergaard Based on a short story of the same title byAugust Derleth
"Keep in Touch—We'll Think of Something" November 24, 1971 Gene Kearney Gene Kearney Alex CordJoanna Pettet
"Pickman's Model" December 1, 1971 Alvin Sapinsley Jack Laird Bradford DillmanLouise Sorel Based on a short story of the same title byH. P. Lovecraft
"The Dear Departed" December 1, 1971 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Steve LawrenceMaureen Arthur,Harvey Lembeck Based on a short story of the same name by Alice-Mary Schnirring
"An Act of Chivalry" December 1, 1971 Jack Laird Jack Laird Deidre Hall
"Cool Air" December 8, 1971 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Barbara RushHenry Darrow Based on a short story by H.P. Lovecraft
"Camera Obscura" December 8, 1971 Rod Serling John Badham René AuberjonoisRoss Martin Based on a short story of the same title byBasil Copper
"Quoth the Raven" December 8, 1971 Jack Laird Jeff Corey Marty Allen
"The Messiah on Mott Street" December 15, 1971 Rod Serling Don Taylor Edward G. RobinsonYaphet Kotto,Tony Roberts
"The Painted Mirror" December 15, 1971 Gene Kearney Gene Kearney Zsa Zsa GaborArthur O'ConnellRosemary DeCamp Based on a short story of the same title byDonald Wandrei
"The Different Ones" December 29, 1971 Rod Serling John Meredyth Lucas Dana AndrewsJon Korkes Parallels themes from the Serling-pennedThe Twilight Zone episode "The Eye of the Beholder"
"Tell David…" December 29, 1971 Gerald Sanford Jeff Corey Sandra DeeJared Martin Based on a short story of the same title byPenelope Wallace
"Logoda's Heads" December 29, 1971 Robert Bloch Jeannot Szwarc Patrick MacneeBrock PetersDenise NicholasTim Matheson Based on a short story of the same title byAugust Derleth
"Green Fingers" January 5, 1972 Rod Serling John Badham Cameron MitchellElsa Lanchester,Michael Bell Based on a short story by R. C. Cook
"The Funeral" January 5, 1972 Richard Matheson John Meredyth Lucas Joe FlynnWerner KlempererJack Laird Based on the short story of the same name by Richard Matheson
"The Tune in Dan's Café" January 5, 1972 Gerald Sanford & Garrie Bateson David Rawlins Pernell RobertsSusan Oliver Based on a short story by Shamus Frazier
"Lindemann's Catch" January 12, 1972 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Stuart WhitmanHarry Townes
"A Feast of Blood" January 12, 1972 Stanford Whitmore Jeannot Szwarc Sondra LockeNorman Lloyd,Hermione Baddeley Based on a short story "The Fur Brooch" by Dulcie Gray
"The Late Mr. Peddington" January 12, 1972 Jack Laird Jeff Corey Harry MorganKim Hunter Based on a short story "The Flat Male" by Frank Sisk; features a brief, late appearance by Randy Quaid
"The Miracle at Camafeo" January 19, 1972 Rod Serling Ralph Senesky Harry GuardinoJulie AdamsRay Danton Based on a short story by C. B. Gilford
"The Ghost of Sorworth Place" January 19, 1972 Alvin Sapinsley Ralph Senesky Richard KileyJill Ireland Based on the short story "Sorworth Place" by Russell Kirk
"The Waiting Room" January 26, 1972 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Steve ForrestAlbert SalmiLex BarkerJim DavisBuddy Ebsen
"Last Rites for a Dead Druid" January 26, 1972 Alvin Sapinsley Jeannot Szwarc Bill BixbyCarol LynleyDonna DouglasNed Glass
"Deliveries in the Rear" February 9, 1972 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Cornel WildeRosemary ForsythKent Smith
"Stop Killing Me" February 9, 1972 Jack Laird Jeannot Szwarc Geraldine PageJames Gregory Based on a short story of the same title by Hal Dresner
"Dead Weight" February 9, 1972 Jack Laird Timothy Galfas Jack AlbertsonBobby Darin Based on the short story "Out of the Country" by Jeffry Scott
"I'll Never Leave You—Ever" February 16, 1972 Jack Laird Daniel Haller Lois NettletonRoyal DanoJohn Saxon Based on a short story of the same title by Rene Morris
"There Aren't Any More MacBanes" February 16, 1972 Alvin Sapinsley John Newland Joel GreyHoward Duff Features a brief, early appearance by a young Mark Hamill. Based on the short story "By One, By Two and By Three" by Stephen Hall
"You Can't Get Help like That Anymore" February 23, 1972 Rod Serling Jeff Corey Cloris LeachmanBroderick Crawford,Lana Wood
"The Sins of the Fathers" February 23, 1972 Halsted Welles Jeannot Szwarc Geraldine PageRichard Thomas,Michael Dunn Based on a short story of the same title byChristianna Brand
"The Caterpillar" March 1, 1972 Rod Serling Jeannot Szwarc Joanna PettetLaurence HarveyJohn Williams Based on the short story "Boomerang" byOscar Cook
"Little Girl Lost" March 1, 1972 Stanford Whitmore Timothy Galfas Ed NelsonWilliam WindomIvor Francis Based on a short story of the same title byE.C. Tubb
"Satisfaction Guaranteed" March 22, 1972 Jack Laird Jeannot Szwarc Victor Buono Vignette, premiered during a repeat broadcast of the September 22, 1971 episode, replacing "Witches' Feast"

Season 3: 1972–73[edit]Edit

Title Original airdate Writer Director Cast Notes
"Return of the Sorcerer" September 24, 1972 Halsted Welles Vincent PricePatricia SterlingBill Bixby Based on a short story of the same title byClark Ashton Smith
"The Girl with the Hungry Eyes" October 1, 1972 Robert Malcolm Young James FarentinoJohn AstinJoanna Pettet Based on a short story of the same title byFritz Leiber
"Rare Objects" October 22, 1972 Rod Serling Mickey RooneyRaymond Massey
"Spectre in Tap-Shoes" October 29, 1972 Gene Kearney Sandra DeeDane ClarkChristopher Connelly Story by Jack Laird
"Through a Flame Darkly" November 5, 1972 Dick Nelson John Newland Sandra DeeJohn Anderson
"You Can Come Up Now, Mrs. Millikan" November 12, 1972 Rod Serling Ozzie NelsonHarriet NelsonRoger DavisMichael Lerner Based on the short story "The Secret of the Vault" by J. Wesley Rosenquist
"Smile, Please" November 12, 1972 Jack Laird Cesare DanovaLindsay Wagner
"The Other Way Out" November 19, 1972 Gene Kearney Burl IvesRoss Martin Story by Kurt van Elting
"Fright Night" December 10, 1972 Robert Malcolm Young Stuart WhitmanBarbara Anderson,Alan Napier Story by Kurt van Elting
"Finnegan's Flight" December 17, 1972 Rod Serling Burgess MeredithCameron Mitchell,Barry Sullivan
"She'll Be Company for You" December 24, 1972 David Rayfiel Leonard NimoyLorraine GaryKathryn Hays Based on a short story of the same title byAndrea Newman
"The Ring with the Red Velvet Ropes" January 7, 1973 Robert Malcolm Young Gary LockwoodJoan van ArkChuck Connors Based on a short story of the same title byEdward D. Hoch
"Something in the Woodwork" January 14, 1973 Rod Serling Leif Erickson, Paul Jenkins, John McMurtry, Geraldine PageBarbara Rhoades Based on the short story "Housebound" byR. Chetwynd-Hayes
"Death on a Barge" March 4, 1973 Halsted Welles Leonard Nimoy Lesley Ann WarrenLou Antonio,Brooke Bundy, Robert Pratt Based on the short story "The Canal" by Everil Worrell; it was Nimoy's directing debut
"Whisper" May 13, 1973 David Rayfiel Dean StockwellSally Field Based on a short story by Martin Waddell
"The Doll of Death" May 20, 1973 Jack Guss Susan StrasbergAlejandro Rey Based on a short story by Vivian Meik
"Hatred unto Death" May 27, 1973 Halsted Welles Steve ForrestDina MerrillFernando Lamas Based on an Inner Sanctum Mysteryepisode from 1941 titled The Man from Yesterday, written by Milton Geiger[4]
"How to Cure the Common Vampire" May 27, 1973 Jack Laird Jack Laird Richard DeaconJohnny Brown
"Die Now, Pay Later" Will GeerSlim Pickens Based on the short story "Year-End Clearance" by Mary Linn Roby
"Room for One Less" Jack Laird Jack Laird Lee Jay Lambert, James Metropole

Award nominations[edit]Edit

Night Gallery was nominated for an Emmy Award for its first-season episode "They're Tearing Down Tim Riley's Bar" as the Outstanding Single Program on U.S. television in 1971. In 1972, the series received another nomination (Outstanding Achievement in Makeup) for the second-season episode "Pickman's Model."

Books[edit]Edit

Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour is a compelling and comprehensive look at the making of dramatist and pop-culture icon Rod Serling’s last anthology series. One of the most unusual and innovative television series of its day, Night Gallery captured the imagination of a generation of viewers with its brilliant mix of classic horror-fantasy tales and stories reflective of the mod, revolutionary mood of the late 1960s. For the first time, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour reveals the inside story of the young artists who got their start on the show, many of whom would later achieve fame in the industry. Night Gallery helped launch the careers of Steven SpielbergDiane KeatonMark HamillJohn Badham,Lindsay WagnerJeannot SzwarcDeidre Hall, and many others. It also marked the directorial debuts of Steven Spielberg, John Astin, and Leonard Nimoy. Also: uncovered for the first time in any book, new revelations regarding Steven Spielberg’s sometimes tumultuous tenure on the show, including an attempt by an NBC executive to ban him from the industry. Four years in the making, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour features more than 160 interviews with virtually every actor, writer, director, producer, and technician involved in the show. With evocative and often humorous anecdotes, this book details the day-to-day creative struggles among the talented filmmakers who fought for innovation in an industry that understood only conformity. Also explored: intimate firsthand reports of Rod Serling’s battles with NBC, Universal Studios, and producer Jack Laird, and archival proof that Serling was not rewritten as aggressively as past biographies have reported. Illustrated with rare, never-before-published photographs, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour examines a studio system that, long before The X-Files, refused to acknowledge the commercial potential of a horror-fantasy TV show. The series was so popular among young people that students at Harvard and Yale created Night Gallery viewing clubs, and fans bootlegged 16 millimeter dupe copies of the show in a pre-videotape era. Night Gallery’s sponsors actually begged NBC not to cancel it—to no avail. Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour features a lineup of interviews that reads like a mid-’70s Who’s Who of Hollywood: Leonard NimoyLindsay WagnerJohn AstinLeslie NielsenDesi Arnaz Jr., Richard ThomasSydney PollackRoddy McDowallZsa Zsa GaborWilliam WindomPat BooneSondra LockeStuart Whitman,Phyllis DillerJohn SaxonRené AuberjonoisJoanna PettetJoseph CampanellaRichard KileyJames FarentinoMichele Lee,Bradford DillmanHenry Darrow, and many more. Literate and engrossing, humorous and ironic, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour is a must-read for any fan of Rod Serling, of television, or of the industry itself. Not a fluff-filled, “just add water” TV companion, this book deserves space on the bookshelf of anyone who remembers their weekly visits into the eerie darkness of Rod Serling’s Night Gallery.[5] .

Syndication[edit]Edit

In order to increase the number of episodes that were available for syndication, the 60-minute episodes were reedited into a 30-minute time slot, with many segments severely cut, and others extended by inserting 'new' scenes of recycled, previously discarded, or stock footage to fill up the time. In their book Rod Serling's Night Gallery: An After-Hours Tour, authors Scott Skelton and Jim Benson identify 39 of the 98 individual segments that were produced for Night Gallery as being "severely altered" in syndication. As well, 25 episodes of a short-lived (and otherwise unrelated) supernatural series from 1972, The Sixth Sense, were also incorporated into the syndicated version of the series, with Serling providing newly filmed introductions to those episodes. As The Sixth Sense was originally a one-hour show, these episodes were all severely edited to fit into the half-hour timeslot.

In recent years, the original, uncut version of the series (and without the additional Sixth Sense episodes) has been shown on the Encore Mystery cable network, allowing fans to see the episodes in their original format for the first time in 30 years. The show is also available in some markets through the Retro Television Network and MeTV. All three seasons, excluding the pilot episode and the "Witches Feast" segment from Season Two, are available on Hulu free of charge.

Paintings[edit]Edit

New introductions with Rod Serling were filmed, and the paintings for the 25 additional episodes were painted by the artist for the Gallery pilot, Jaroslav Gebr. None of these 25 extra paintings are included here. Most of the original paintings for Night Gallery were either altered for use in other productions or sold by Universal Studios years ago. For the most part they remain in private hands, although occasionally one shows up at an auction house. There are some forgeries floating around, the exact number unknown. In December 2002, two forgeries were offered in an online auction from Sotheby’s through eBay. Before the auction started, one of the fakes was pulled, a bad copy of “The Late Mr. Peddington”—which had, accurately enough, its original title scrawled on the back of the painting, “The Flat Male,” meaning that the forger had access to the original during the forging process. Still, an obvious fake of “The Flip-Side of Satan” was auctioned off at that time. Care must be taken by potential buyers if a Night Gallery painting is spotted at auction. If there is a question of authenticity, seek out an expert’s help.

Universal Studios released a series of twelve art-print posters of some of the Gallery paintings in 1972. They are long out of print, although they occasionally show up at a collector’s store or in an eBay auction. None of the reproductions included paintings from the pilot film or the first season of the series. Second season titles included “House—with Ghost,” “You Can’t Get Help like That Anymore,” “The Dear Departed,” “The Devil Is Not Mocked,” “The Tune in Dan’s Café,” and “Phantom of What Opera?” Third season titles included “You Can Come Up Now, Mrs. Millikan,” “Fright Night,” “Spectre in Tap-Shoes,” “She’ll Be Company for You,” and “Rare Objects” (this last was altered from the version shown in the series episode). The last of the twelve art prints, titled “The Return of the Sorcerer,” was not the painting used for that episode in the series. It is definitely by Tom Wright, but it may have been painted for an unproduced segment of the show.

DVD releases[edit]Edit

In 2004, Universal released the Region 1 DVD collection (including the pilot film and the six episodes of the first season) of the series, plus bonus episodes from Seasons 2 and 3 as extras. On October 16, 2006, the first season (including the pilot film and two bonus episodes, one from Season 2 and one from Season 3) was released on Region 2 DVD.

In August 2008, Universal announced a November 11, 2008, release of the complete Season 2 DVD collection (only Region 1). Later, they announced that one story segment from Season 2, "Witches' Feast", would not be included, due to the fact that "Universal was not able to locate portions of the 40-year-old episode."

Season three was released on April 10, 2012. "Witches' Feast" is included as bonus material.

DVD name Ep # Release date Additional information
The Complete First Season 17 August 24, 2004
Season 2 61 November 11, 2008
  • Podcast commentaries, featuring Jim Benson and Scott Skelton
  • Audio commentaries, with Guillermo del Toro
  • Revisiting the Gallery: A Look Back
  • Art Gallery: The Paintings in "Rod Serling's Night Gallery"
  • NBC TV Promos
Season 3 20 April 10, 2012

See also[edit]Edit

Similar series

References[edit]Edit

  1. Jump up^ "Night Gallery"The New York Times.
  2. Jump up^ Skelton, Scott; Benson, Jim (1999). Rod Serling's Night Gallery: An After-Hours TourSyracuse University PressISBN 978-0-8156-2782-1.
  3. Jump up^ http://nightgallery.net/night-gallery-episode-guide/
  4. Jump up^ Skelton, Scott; Benson, Jim (2012). Night gallery / Season three (DVD). Universal City, California, USA: Universal StudiosOCLC 773758625. Retrieved January 4, 2013.
  5. Jump up^ http://nightgallery.net/read-the-book-an-after-hours-tour/

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